David Park to Perform on Highway 89 and at the U.’s Dumke Recital Hall

 

David ParkDavid Park likes to stay busy.

Besides his day-to-day job as the Utah Symphony’s assistant concertmaster, Park enjoys a lively concert schedule both within Utah and out of state. Just last November, Park appeared with the Roanoke Symphony under David Wiley, playing Mendelssohn’s popular Violin Concerto to critical acclaim. (Read a review of the concert here: http://www.roanoke.com/arts_and_entertainment/concert-review-rso-plays-mendelssohn-mozart-and-winkler/article_3d3e106e-c03a-5fe8-bfb4-980d2f9916c1.html.)

Closer to home, Park will be the featured guest artist on Classical 89’s Highway 89 program. Airing this Tuesday at 8 p.m. (with a repeat at 5 p.m. on March 31), Park will honor J.S. Bach on the occasion of the great German baroque composer’s 333rd birthday with a performance of the Partita No. 1 in B minor for solo violin, BWV 1002.

“This will be a milestone for me,” Park said in an interview. “With this performance I’ll have played all six of the solo partitas and sonatas in Utah. The only other person to have done that in Utah was Joseph Silverstein, although he played the whole set on one concert.”

The only other work on the program will be the Fugue from Béla Bartók’s Sonata for Solo Violin. One of the composer’s last works, it was commissioned by Yehudi Menuhin and premiered by him in 1944. “It’s one of the most important works in the solo violin repertoire,” Park said, adding that it is also one of the most demanding.
Two days after his radio recital, Park will play another concert.

On March 29, he’ll be joined by violist and Utah Symphony colleague Scott Lewis; pianist and University of Utah faculty member Alex Marshall; and bassist and Brigham Young University professor Eric Hansen. “I’ve been wanting to do a collaborative concert for some time now that brought together members of the three main arts organizations in Utah,” Park said.

The program will be divided into solos, duets and a finale that features all four players in two movements from Astor Piazzolla’s “The Four Seasons.” The program will also include music by Saint-Saëns, Handel/Halvorsen, Kodály, Glière and Weber. “It’s going to be quite a diverse program,” Park promised. The concert will be at 7:30 p.m. in Dumke Recital Hall in David Gardner Hall on the U. campus. Admission is free.

Utah Electronic Musicians Sign with Philip Glass’ Orange Mountain Music

The Salt Lake Electric Ensemble (SLEE) announce signing with Orange Mountain Music (OMM) of New York City, NY. The record label was founded in 2001, and was developed out of a project undertaken to archive all the master recordings that Philip Glass had made. OMM will release SLEE’s recording of Glass’ classic 1970 masterwork, Music With Changing Parts, worldwide on Feb. 16. Relying on a combination of synthesis, sampling and traditional acoustic instruments SLEE’s recording is hypnotic, dreamlike, and psychedelic.

SLEE formed in 2009 with a dual purpose: to perform and record Terry Riley’s 1964 masterwork In C, and to explore music making with the most powerful and intriguing musical instrument of our time: the computer.  SLEE’s 2010 recording of In C, notable for being the first rendition to primarily use electronic instruments, was lauded by critics and audiences throughout the world. Now the ensemble has turned their attention to one of the world’s most cherished and influential living composers: New York City’s Philip Glass. Glass’ extensive body of work includes symphonies, operas, chamber music, piano works and more.

SLEE views Music With Changing Parts to be a culmination of Glass’s early career. The score is comprised of a progression of 76 intricate harmonic patterns distributed across 6-8 performers who are free to repeat the patterns as many times as they wish and to play the patterns using any combination of instruments. Along with these patterns, in a number of places Glass instructs the performers to improvise a series of long held tones, to be individually selected through careful listening to the prevailing ensemble sound.  

The Salt Lake Electric Ensemble have delivered an interpretation of the music that, while true to the instructions contained in the score, is thoroughly of the present moment. By employing multiple laptop computers programmed with each note from the score to assist them, the musicians of the ensemble were able to achieve exact rhythmic precision while performing, freeing them to focus on sound design and improvisation.

The recording will be available on CD from Amazon.com and saltlakeelectricensemble.com, as a download from Apple’s iTunes, and will be streaming on Spotify and Apple Music.