WHAT’S HAPPENING THIS WEEK IN MUSIC (APRIL 22-28, 2015)

(Be sure to visit our monthly concert calendar by clicking on “Events Calendar.”)

WESTMINSTER COLLEGE, Jazz Ensemble, David Holliday, music director, the concert will an array of beloved standards and new works in various styles, April 22, 7:30 p.m., Courage Theatre, Emma Eccles Jones Conservatory, Vieve Gore Concert Hall, free.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Piano: Lennox Larson Scholarship Concert, April 22, 7:30 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall in David Gardner Hall, $10 general, $6 seniors, staff, faculty, and non-U. students, free for U. students, 801-581-7100, www.kingtix.com.

UTAH SYMPHONY, Entertainment Series, “The Midtown Men,” original cast members from the Broadway show The Jersey Boys, Jerry Steichen, conductor, April 21, 7:30 p.m., Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts, Weber State University, $26-$44 general, 801-399-9214 0r visit our office at 638 26th Street, Ogden, or go online to www.symphonyballet.org.

UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY, Symphony Orchestra, April 23, 7:30 p.m., Kent Concert Hall, $8-$10, 435-797-8022, www.arts.usu.edu.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Composers Forum, April 23, 7:30 p.m., Dumke Recital Hall, in David Gardner Hall, free.

UTAH SYMPHONY, Entertainment Series, “The Midtown Men,” original cast members from the Broadway show The Jersey Boys, Jerry Steichen, conductor, April 24-25, 8 p.m., Abravanel Hall, $10-$85 (tickets are $5 more on the day of the performance), see website or contact box office for information regarding student tickets, 801-355-2787, 888-451-2787, www.arttix.org, for further ticket information please call 801-533-6683, www.utahsymphony.org.

UTAH VALLEY UNIVERSITY, Mozart’s Così fan tutte, UVU Opera, Tyler Nelson, artistic director, and Symphony Orchestra, Cheung Chau, conductor, Così fan tutte (Women Are Like That), is about two couples who put their relationships to the test, two young men Ferrando and Guglielmo and their older friend Don Alfonso devise a plot in which they pretend to head off to war, only to return, disguised as passionate suitors to flirt with their fiancées and ultimately prove that their women will be faithful to the men they are pledged to, unlike other women, mix in a saucy chambermaid, Despina, and chaos ensues, April 24-25, 7:30 p.m., Heritage High School, 5600 Heritage School Drive, Provo, $10 general, $5 students, 801-863-7529, or box office located in Noorda Theatre, or Campus Connection, www.uvu.edu/arts.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Lyric Opera Ensemble, Utah Philharmonia present, Jules Massenet’s Cendrillon (Cinderella), this witty tale, based on Perrault’s 1698 fairy tale, combines the sumptuousness of French operetta and the sense of magic and surprise of a Disney classic, April 24-25, 7:30 p.m., Kingsbury Hall, $20 general, $10 non U. students, free for U. students, children 17 and under free, 801-581-7100, www.kingtix.com.

WESTMINSTER COLLEGE, Chamber Singers, “Spring Concert,” April 24-25, 7:30 p.m., Vieve Gore Concert Hall, Emma Eccles Jones Conservatory, $10 general, $5 non-Westminster students, Westminster staff, faculty and students get one free ticket, www.westminstercollege.edu/culturalevents.

TEMPLE SQUARE FESTIVAL OF CHOIRS, April 24, 6:30 p.m., Heralders Children’s Choir, Debby Smith, director; April 24, 8 p.m.,  Salt Lake Symphonic Choir, Erin Tall, director; April 25, 6:30 p.m., We Also Sing! South (women’s choir), Merilee Webb, director; April 25, 8 p.m., Sterling Singers, Kelly DeHaan, director; all concerts are free, no tickets required.

SALT LAKE MEN’S CHOIR, “A Touch of Class,” performing elegant music ranging from Vivaldi to modern interpretations, featuring soloists from the Metropolitan Opera auditions in Utah, and accompanied by a nine-piece orchestra, April 24-25, 7:30 p.m., First Baptist Church, 777 S. 1300 East, Salt Lake City, $15 general, tickets are good for either night, tickets are available from choir members, The Library Store at The City Library, at Club Try-Angles, or online at www.brownpapertickets.com.

UTAH SYMPHONY, Family Series, “Peter Pan and Other Adventures,” Vladimir Kulenovic, conductor, April 25, 11 a.m. and 12:30 p.m., Abravanel Hall, $6-$18 general, 801-355-2787, 888-451-2787, www.utahsymphony.org.

MURRAY CONCERT BAND, “Magic, Mystery and Fantasy,” Dr. Craig Ferrin, conductor, Wayne Huff, assistant conductor, April 25, 7:30 p.m., Murray High School, 5440 S. State St., free, but donations accepted, www.murrayconcertband.org.

SALT LAKE SYMPHONY, “Utah Talent Spotlight,” Barbara Scowcroft, guest conductor, Shenae Anderson, violin, music includes Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 4, Italian, and Beethoven’s Violin Concerto, April 25, 7:30 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall, University of Utah, $10 general, $5 students, seniors, and children, 801-531-7501 or at the door with cash, check or credit card, www.saltlakesymphony.org.

MURRAY CONCERT BAND, “Spring Concert,” Dr. Craig Ferrin, principal conductor, Winter Concert,” April 25, 7:30 p.m., Murray High School Auditorium, free.

DAVIS COUNTY SYMPHONY, “Spring Concert,” Kent Nelson, music director, and Dan Rich, assistant music director, April 25, 7 p.m., Christian Life Center, 2352 E. Hwy. 193, Layton, for more information visit their website at http://www.daviscountysymphony.org/modx1/.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Sundays@7 Faculty Spotlight, Beethoven Series, Vedrana Subotic, piano, Lun Jiang, violin and Pegsoon Whang, cello, April 26, 7 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall in David Gardner Hall, free.

MADELEINE FESTIVAL, Ghislain Leroy and Romain Leleu, trumpet/organ concert featuring music from the renaissance era, all the way to the contemporary, April 26, 8 p.m., Cathedral of the Madeleine, 331 E. South Temple, free and open to the public, www.utcotm.org.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Flute Choir, April 26, 5 p.m., Dumke Recital Hall, in David Gardner Hall, free.

AMERICAN FORK SYMPHONY, “Salute to Youth,” Shauna Smith, conductor, featuring Elizabeth Zhang, Alyssa Buck, and Joseph Raty, piano, Emily McMurtrey, and Cassidy Erickson, violin, and Amanda Hofheins, cello, April 27, 7 p.m., American Fork Junior High Auditorium, 1120 N. 20 West, $5 general, $3 children (3-18), $15 family, at the door.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Advanced String Quartets, April 27, 7:30 p.m., Dumke Recital Hall, in David Gardner Hall, free.

WEBER STATE UNIVERSITY, WSU Guitar Ensemble, April 27, 7:30 p.m., Eccles Theater, Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts, $6-$7, 800-978-8457, www.weberstatetickets.com.

WESTMINSTER COLLEGE, Westminster Chorale, “Spring Concert,” April 28, 7:30 p.m., Vieve Gore Concert Hall, Emma Eccles Conservatory, free.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, New Music Ensemble, April 28, 7:30 p.m., Dumke Recital Hall, in David Gardner Hall, free.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING THIS WEEK IN THEATRE (APRIL 22-28, 2015)

(Be sure to visit our monthly theatre calendar by clicking on “Events Calendar.”)

WEBER STATE UNIVERSITY, One-Act Play Festival, through April 25, 7:30 p.m., Eccles Theater, Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts, $10-$12, 800-978-8457, www.weberstatetickets.com.

COVEY CENTER FOR THE ARTS, Shrek, Jr., presented by the Center Stage Youth Performers, for ages 2 and up, through April 25, 7 p.m., Main Hall, $7-$9, 801-852-7007, www.provo.org/community/covey-center-for-the-arts.

HALE CENTRE THEATRE-OREM, Les Misérables, based on the novel by Victor Hugo, book by Alain Boublil and Jean-Marc Natel, music by Claude-Michel Schönberg, lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer, the musical tells the story of Jean Valjean, a runaway convict seeking redemption after serving 19 years in a prison for stealing a loaf of bread, his journey to freedom collides and converges with the lives of the worst and the best of humanity, through April 25, 7:30 p.m., also 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. matinees on Saturdays, $17-$21 general, $13-$17 children, 801-226-8600, www.haletheater.org.

UTAH CHILDREN’S THEATRE, Zorro!, at a fiesta Don Carlos wants his daughter, the beautiful Valencia, to marry Don Alejandro’s son, the charming but seemingly weak Don Diego, but treasure and treachery is in the midst of Old California, led by Captain Ramon, the bumbling Sergeant Gonzales and a mysterious figure, only Zorro can stop the greedy tyrants and bring them to justice, through April 25, 1 p.m., 4:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. performances, 3605 S. State St., $14 general, 801-532-6000, www.uctheatre.org.

SILVER SUMMIT THEATRE, Five Lesbians Eating a Quiche, regional premiere of Evan Linder and Andrew Hobgood’s frolicsome little play that ventures into everybody’s favorite absurdism, directed by Dave Hanson, in 1956 with the ever present threat of nuclear war looming over them the widows of the Susan B. Anthony Society for the Sisters of Gertrude Stein meet in a renovated community center for a special annual event, where the prize winning quiche will be declared in a much anticipated ceremony, and will they be able to keep their cool while in the midst of their beloved annual event Communists descend on their idyllic town, through April 26, 8 p.m., 4 p.m. only matinee on April 26, The Sugar Space, 616 E. Wilmington Ave., $15-$20 online, general seating available at the door, www.silversummittheatre.org.

PYGMALION THEATRE COMPANY, Mockingbird, by Julie Jensen, directed by Tracy Callahan, born with Asperger’s Syndrome, 11 year old Caitlin’s world is black and white, fortunately, her brother taught her which behavior to imitate so people wouldn’t think of her as weird, when she loses him to tragedy, Caitlin must learn to navigate the colors and cacophony of emotion to bring order to her chaotic world, based on a book by Kathryn Erskine, Mockingbird sees life through the eyes of autism, through May 2, 7:30 p.m., also a 2 p.m. matinee on May 2, 2 p.m. matinee only on April 26, Leona Wagner Black Box, Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, $20, 801-355-2787, www.arttix.org.

SALT LAKE ACTING COMPANY, world premiere of Mr. Perfect, by William Missouri Downs, directed by John Caywood, the play tells the story of a quirky flight attendant and romance novel junkie who thinks she’s met Mr. Perfect, when it doesn’t work out, she sets out to connect the random events that make up life, hoping to find the meaning of it all, through May 3, 1 p.m., 2 p.m., 6 p.m., and 7:30 p.m. performances, Upstairs Theatre, 168 W. 500 North, $24-$42 general, 801-363-7522, or log on to www.saltlakeactingcompany.org.

PLEASANT GROVE PLAYERS, The Boys Next Door, by Tom Griffin, the play shares the story of four mentally handicapped men who live in a communal residence in New England, where they are under the supervision of a very earnest social worker named Jack Norman, who is increasingly “burned out” by his work, through May 4, 7:30 p.m., also a 3 p.m. matinee on May 2 (Friday, Saturday and Monday performances), Keith Christeson Theater (lower level of the Pleasant Grove Library), 30 E. Center, Pleasant Grove, $10 general, $9 seniors and students, www.pgplayers.com.

HERITAGE THEATRE, Lend Me a Tenor, by Ken Ludwig, in 1934, Saunders, the general manager of the Cleveland Grand Opera Company, is primed to welcome world famous Tito Merelli, the greatest tenor of his generation, to appear for one night only as Otello, the star arrives late and through a series of mishaps is given a double dose of tranquilizers and passes out, but everybody thinks he’s dead, so Saunders’ assistant, Max, gets into costume to pretend to be Tito, in the meantime Merelli comes to and gets into his other costume, now there are two Otellos running around,  through May 9, 7:30 p.m., also a 2 p.m. matinee on April 25, $10 general, $9 seniors/children under 12, S. Highway 89, Peery, 435-723-8392, www.heritagetheatreutah.com.

SCERA CENTER, Guys and Dolls, book by Jo Swerling and Abe Burrows, music and lyrics by Frank Loesser, April 17-May 9, 7:30 p.m., $12 general, $10 seniors (65+ years) and children (ages 3-11 years), 745 S. State, Orem, 801-225-2787, www.scera.org.

THE ZIEGFELD THEATRE, Les Misérables, lyrics by Alain Boublil and Jean-Marc Natel, music by Claude-Michel Schönberg, English lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer, Jean Valjean is released from unjust imprisonment after 19 years, but finds nothing in store for him but mistrust and mistreatment, through May 16, 7:30 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees on Saturdays, $19 general online ($20 at the door), $17 seniors/students/children (12 and under) online ($18 at the door), 3924 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855-949-2787, www.theziegfeldtheater.com.

CENTERPOINT LEGACY THEATRE, Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, book by Jeffrey Lane, music and lyrics by David Yaybek, directed by Jim Christian, lying, cheating, totally dishonest, dirty, rotten, and completely hilarious, two swindlers make a bet, but end up getting a surprise of their own, this conman comedy will have you rolling in the aisles,  through May 16, 7:30 p.m., Barlow Main Stage, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, $17.25-$23.25 general, 801-298-1302, www.centerpointtheatre.org.

HALE CENTRE THEATRE-WEST VALLEY CITY, Over the River and Through the Woods, by Joe DiPietro, in New Jersey two very loud sets of grandparents simply adore their 29-year-old grandson, when he tells them he might take a job in Seattle, they think a girl might make him stay, through May 23, 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. performances, $27-$30 general, $16 children (5-11 years, no children under 5 years permitted), 801-984-9000, www.halecentretheatre.org.

TERRACE PLAZA PLAYHOUSE, Annie Get Your Gun, book by Dorothy Fields, music and lyrics by Irving Berlin, Annie Oakley is the best shot around, when she’s discovered by Buffalo Bill he persuades her to join his Wild West Show, where she falls head over heels for dashing shooting ace Frank Butler, who headlines the show, through May 30, 7:30 p.m., 99 E. 4700 South, Ogden, $12-$14 general, $11-$13 seniors/students, $9-$11 children (12 and under), 801-393-0070, http://terraceplayhouse.com.

DESERT STAR PLAYHOUSE, Into The Hoods: A Fractured Fairy Tale, through June 6, 2:30 p.m., 6 p.m., 7 p.m., 8:30 p.m., and 9:30 p.m. performances, 4861 S. State Street, Murray, $18.95 adults, $10.95 children (11 years and under), www.desertstar.biz.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Godspell, MTP Senior Showcase, directed and choreographed by the seniors of the musical theatre program, a small group of people help Jesus Christ tell different parables by using a wide variety of games, storytelling techniques, and a hefty dose of comic timing, April 23-26, 7:30 p.m., 2 p.m. matinees on April 25-26, free student previews on April 23-24, 7:30 p.m., Studio 115, $18 general, $15 seniors/U. faculty/staff/military and immediate family, $8.50 students, free for U. students, 801-581-7100, www.kingtix.com.

UTAH VALLEY UNIVERSITY, Noorda Theatre Centre for Children and Youth, The Boy Who Loved Monsters and the Girl Who Loved Peas, directed by James Arrington, when a boy wishes for a monster, and his sister wishes for more peas, they get a pea-headed monster determined to be part of the family, April 24, 1 p.m., Noorda Theatre, $3, 801-863-7529, or box office located in Noorda Theatre, or Campus Connection, www.uvu.edu/arts.

UTAH VALLEY UNIVERSITY, Short Attention Span Theatre, this theatre favorite features 10 10-minute plays written, directed and acted entirely by UVU Theatre students, April 24, 7 p.m., April 25, 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. performances, exBox Theatre, $5, 801-863-7529, or box office located in Noorda Theatre, or Campus Connection, www.uvu.edu/arts.

DRAPER HISTORIC THEATRE, Mary Poppins, a musical based on the stories of P. L. Travers and the Disney film, original music and lyrics by Richard M. Sherman, and Robert B. Sherman, book by Julian Fellowes, new songs and additional music and lyrics by George Stiles and Anthony Drewe, April 24-25, 7 p.m., $9 general, $7 seniors/students/military, $5 children 12 and under, all seats $5 for matinees, reserved tickets, $11 general, $9  seniors/students/military/children, 12366 S. 900 East, 801-572-4144, www.drapertheatre.org.

UTAH VALLEY UNIVERSITY, You Can’t Take It with You, directed by Laurie Harrop-Purser, one of the most popular and successful plays of all time, the story pits the highly eccentric Sycamore family against the uptight Kirby family, resulting in chaos, confusion, understanding, and love, April 25, 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., Noorda Theatre, $12 general, $8 students, 801-863-7529, or box office located in Noorda Theatre, or Campus Connection, www.uvu.edu/arts.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING THIS WEEK IN DANCE (APRIL 22-28, 2015)

(Be sure to visit our monthly dance calendar by clicking on “Events Calendar.”)

UTAH VALLEY UNIVERSITY, Ballroom Dance Company, “A Story,” Paul Winkelman, company director, spectacular dancing, swirling dresses, vibrant energy, and engaging melodies straight from the Broadway stage, April 23-25, 7:30 p.m., with a 2 p.m. matinee also on April 25,   Ragan Theatre, $12 general, $8 students, 801-863-7529, or box office located in Noorda Theatre, or Campus Connection, www.uvu.edu/arts.

REPERTORY DANCE THEATRE, “Reunion,” on the threshold of 50 years, the program features choreography from dancers who have brought us to this milestone, with choreography by RDT alumni Linda C. Smith, Kay Clark, Bill Evans, Lynne Wimmer, Angie Banchero-Kelleher, Brent Schneider, Francisco Gella and Nathan Shaw, April 23-25, 7:30 p.m., Jeanné Wagner Theatre, Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, $30 general, 801-355-2787, www.arttix.org.

BALLET WEST II, presented by The Ogden Symphony Ballet Association, “Aladdin,” follow a poor youth and an entire cast of colorful characters as Aladdin strives to win the love of his beautiful princess and spoil the plans of the wicked sorcerer, April 25, 7 p.m., Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts, Weber State University, $8-$25, for more information and tickets, www.symphonyballet.org.

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SALT LAKE SYMPHONY CONCERT WILL FEATURE 16-YEAR-OLD VIOLINIST SHENAE ANDERSON

While the Salt Lake Symphony’s music director, Robert Baldwin, is busy leading his other ensemble, the Utah Philharmonia in Jules Massenet’s opera Cendrillon, Barbara Scowcroft, will step in and replace him on the podium Saturday.

Shenae Anderson

Scowcroft, who besides being a member of the first violin section of the Utah Symphony and the music director of the Utah Youth Symphony, is no stranger to the Salt Lake Symphony; she’s led the group in several concerts over the years.

Saturday’s program will open with University of Utah composer John Costa’s Vignette, which Scowcroft and the Utah Youth Symphony commissioned to celebrate the Salt Lake Winter Olympics in 2002.

The orchestra will also play Mendelssohn’s exuberant Symphony No. 4, Italian, which the composer wrote after a trip to Italy.

Soloist for the concert will be 16-year-old Shenae Anderson, playing Beethoven’s imposing Violin Concerto. Anderson is the Utah Division winner of Salt Lake City’s Stradivarius Competition. A student of Eugene Watanabe, Anderson has kept herself very busy. She’s soloed twice with the Utah Symphony at its Salute to Youth concerts, and she’s won numerous competitions.

The concert takes place Saturday at 7:30 p.m. in Libby Gardner Concert Hall. Tickets are $10 for general admission and $5 for seniors and students. They’re available at the door or by calling 801-531-7501.

Scowcroft will also lead a free pre-concert discussion at 6:15 p.m. in Room 270, directly behind the concert hall. She’ll focus on the cultural, historical and musical perspectives of the music on the program.

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U. LYRIC OPERA ENSEMBLE PRESENTS MASSENET’S ‘CENDRILLON’ APRIL 24-25

Even though Jules Massenet’s opera Cendrillon (Cinderella) is hardly known in Utah, the fairy tale on which it’s based certainly is universally known, thanks to the magic of Disney.

So when the University of Utah’s Lyric Opera Ensemble decided to do the Massenet opera this spring — a first for Utah, by the way — stage director Michael Scarola knew he wanted to do something a bit different with it. “I wanted to do come up with something unique,” he said in an interview with Reichel Recommends.

After tossing a lot of ideas around, steampunk came up. “I didn’t know much about it so I did some research,” Scarola said. “I found out there are all kinds of steampunk, including sci-fi, Western and Victorian.”

From left: Ruth Ellis as the Fairy Godmother, Jennifer Erickson as Cendrillon. (Photo Credit: Emily Nelson)

When he discovered Victorian steampunk, Scarola was hooked. “I knew exactly what I wanted to do.” He admitted that he likes everything Victorian. “The Victorian period is a favorite of mine. I’m attracted to it — to its society, clothing, everything.”

And the Victorian era fits in with the Cinderella story quite nicely, as well. “Back then you had royalty, elitists, servants. It’s the story of Cinderella, because all the elements are represented. And it fits in with the steampunk imagery, and that imagery fits in with the text. It lets me stay true to the text and music.”

Robert Breault, who heads the opera program at the U., is looking forward to having the Lyric Opera Ensemble be the first to bring Massenet’s 1899 opera to Utah. Speaking by phone from Edmonton, Canada, where he was rehearsing Lucia di Lammermoor, Breault said, “Why doesn’t [Cendrillon] get done? I don’t know. It has an immediate appeal and it’s got something for everyone. Kids and adults will each enjoy different elements of it.”

Cendrillon does get revived every so often and there are several good recordings available. “I saw it at [New York] City Opera several years ago,” Scarola said. Mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato has played a major role in bringing the work to opera houses here and in Europe. “She has been the one who has done more than anyone else to revive it. She’s done it at the Royal Opera and at Barcelona, and also recorded it. And the way she sings [the title role] is amazing.”

Unlike Rossini’s version of the story, in which there are no fairytale elements, Massenet’s embraces all of the magic. “You have to believe in spirits and in a fairy godmother,” Breault said. “It’s pure escapism.”

This production will also include dancers from the U.’s ballet program. “This is the first time we’ve collaborated with another department and we’re excited it’s happening,” Breault said.

The U.’s dance department recently presented its own steampunk version of Prokofiev’s ballet Cinderella, and with some alterations the pas de deux from the ballet will be danced in the opera’s second act. It required some reworking of the opening scene of Act II, but without compromising the integrity and intention of the libretto. “I don’t want to give too much away, but the way we ended up incorporating the ballet into the opera will have the two worlds — Prokofiev’s Cinderella and Massenet’s Cendrillon — come together,” Scarola said.

“I think what we’ve done with it will have people say, ‘Gee, I’m glad I saw it,’” Breault said.

The opera is double cast. Singing the leads are Gretchen Windt and Jennifer Erickson (Cendrillon); Ruth Ellis and Emily Nelson (The Fairy Godmother); and Sidnei Alferes and David Sauer (The Prince).

Also in the cast are Hayley Bell and Makenzie Matthews (Madame de la Haltière); Jared Lesa and Daniel Tuutau (Pandolfe); Hillary Koolhoven and Michelle Dean (Noémie); Alyssa Marie Jenks and Stania Shaw (Dorothée); Scott Hebertson and Nathan Curtis (The King); Gregory Harrison and Hunter Olsen (The Dean of the Faculty); Anders Larson (The Master of Ceremonies); and Garrett Tyler Madlock (The First Minister).

Robert Baldwin will conduct the Utah Philharmonia.

  • PERFORMANCE DETAILS
  • What: Utah Lyric Opera Ensemble, Jules Massenet’s Cendrillon
  • Venue: Kingsbury Hall
  • Time and Date: 7:30 p.m. April 24-25
  • Tickets: $20 general, $10 non U. students, free for U. students and children 17 and under
  • Phone: 801-581-7100
  • Web: www.kingtix.com
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THREE TRIOS BY BRAHMS TO CLOSE WESTMINSTER CONCERT SERIES SEASON

The Westminster Concert Series will end its current season Monday with an all-Brahms concert.

Called “Trio of Trios,” the program will feature a sampling of the composer’s significant chamber works that don’t necessarily receive the attention they deserve: the Trio in A minor for Clarinet, Cello and Piano, op. 114; the Trio in E flat major for Horn, Violin and Piano, op. 40; and the Piano Trio No. 2 in C major, op. 87.

From left: Yuki MacQueen, John Eckstein, Karlyn Bond (Photo Credit: Westminster Concert Series)

Playing these works are Utah Symphony members Yuki MacQueen, violin; John Eckstein, cello; Lee Livengood; clarinet; and Ron Beitel, horn. They’ll be joined by pianist and series director Karlyn Bond.

“These works represent the instruments Brahms fell in love with,” Bond said. And there is a personal connection to two of them, Bond added. “Brahms, of course, was a pianist, and his father played the horn.”

Brahms’ attachment to the clarinet came late in his life. “He fell in love with the sound of the clarinet after hearing Richard Mühlfeld [a renowned clarinetist and younger contemporary of Brahms] play Weber’s First Clarinet Concerto and Mozart’s Clarinet Quintet. He could listen to him for hours.”

What he liked about the clarinet was its range and the distinctive sounds for each of the three registers. “The low register is dark. The middle is velvety, and the upper register is spare,” Bond said. “And in a work like the trio he explores the full range of the instrument.”

The clarinet trio calls to mind late Beethoven, Bond said. “And it’s also what you expect from late Brahms [the work was written in 1891]. There is melancholy and resignation, and also reconciliation with his mortality. It’s strange in a lot of places and not really immediately accessible for general audiences.” But it’s also tantalizing and beautiful. “It’s ethereal and austere at the same time.”

The horn trio, written in 1865, is the earliest of the three works on the program, and not a work that’s heard in the concert hall frequently. “When Yuki suggested we do the horn trio, Ron was onboard right away,” Bond said. “It’s a work he hadn’t played in 20 years and he was ready to play it again.”

Brahms wrote the horn part for a valveless horn. “He knew it was impractical, but he wanted that particular sound,” Bond said. “Ron is mindful of that, and it effects the way he plays certain passages,” in order to try and recreate the sound the composer envisioned.

Of the three trios, the C major Piano Trio is by far the biggest. “It’s the most substantial, and it has a massive piano part,” Bond said.

The most interesting of the trio’s four movements, according to Bond, is the Andante. “It’s unique among his slow movements,” she said. “It’s a Gypsy influenced melody that is very potent and a bit dark, but not in a despairing way. The music is serious, but not sad. It’s my favorite single movement in the whole program.”

  • CONCERT DETAILS
  • What: “Trio of Trios: An Evening of Brahms”
  • Venue: Vieve Gore Concert Hall, Westminster College
  • Time and Date: 7:30 p.m. April 20
  • Tickets: $15 general, free for students and Westminster College faculty and staff with I.D.
  • Phone: 801-832-2457
  • Web: www.westminstercollege.edu/culturalevents 
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ALL-MOZART WEEKEND AT THE UTAH SYMPHONY

UTAH SYMPHONY, Abravanel Hall, April 17; additional performance 8 p.m. April 18, tickets at 801-355-2787, 888-451-2787 or www.utahsymphony.org 

In a refreshing change from its usual heavily 19th century repertoire, this weekend’s Utah Symphony program is an all-Mozart affair.

Mozart’s works are among the most difficult to play well. His music demands craftsmanship and impeccable interpretative skills as well as consummate musicality and technique.

Fortunately, all this was on display Friday evening. Under the remarkable leadership of guest conductor Paul Goodwin the orchestra gave finely articulated readings of the three works on the program: the Symphony in D major (after the Posthorn Serenade), the Symphony No. 41, Jupiter, and the Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major, K. 467.

Goodwin, a replacement for the originally scheduled Bernard Labadie, elicited wonderfully precise playing from the ensemble, with beautifully molded dynamics and nuanced expressions. The only sour note to the evening was that the finale of the Jupiter came across a bit muddled because Goodwin lost control of the balance and let the trumpets and timpani overpower the others.

This weekend’s guest soloist, Benedetto Lupo, is no stranger to Utah. He has appeared here in the past; he is also a former contestant and judge at the Gina Bachauer competition.

The C major Concerto is one of Mozart’s most popular concertos, thanks to its appealing melodies and light, airy character. Film buffs will also recognize the slow movement from the 1967 Swedish film Elvira Madigan.

Lupo showed himself to be a fine Mozart interpreter and excellent technician who brought much to the table in terms of musicality. This was an exceptionally conceived and executed account of the concerto that let the music stand on its own without any editorializing from the soloist or the conductor. He and Goodwin captured the intimacy of the work with their nicely balanced interplay between the piano and ensemble. The performance was an absolute delight from start to finish.

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WORKS BY BEETHOVEN AND RIHM GIVEN SPLENDID TREATMENT BY KATHRYN EBERLE AND JASON HARDINK

NOVA GALLERY SERIES, Julie Nester Gallery, Park City, April 16; additional performance 3 p.m. April 19, Art Barn, tickets at the door, www.novaslc.org 

Beethoven’s 10 violin sonatas cover a large chunk of his creative life. They explore the violin’s capabilities as a conveyor of dramatic passion as well as lyricism. They also delve into the relationship between the violin and the piano. All in all, they are remarkable works and staples of the repertoire.

For the past two seasons these sonatas have been the focus of the NOVA Chamber Music Series’ Gallery Series. As played by Utah Symphony associate concertmaster Kathryn Eberle and symphony principal keyboardist and NOVA artistic director Jason Hardink, this mini series has been a wonderful addition to NOVA’s other offerings.

Jason Hardink and Kathryn Eberle (Photo: Courtesy NOVA Chamber Music Series)

The final installment of the Beethoven series took place yesterday in the intimate confines of Park City’s Julie Nester Gallery (the program will be repeated Sunday in Salt Lake City’s Finch Lane Gallery at the Art Barn).

These sonatas need an exceptional violinist and pianist and a strong collaborative effort between the two players to be successfully executed. And that is certainly the case with Eberle and Hardink. At Thursday’s concert, at which the last two sonatas were played (no. 9 in A major, Kreutzer, and no. 10 in G major, op. 96), the duo showed they were on the same wavelength, giving a very musical interpretation of both and balancing each other perfectly. Both sonatas received a splendid treatment at their hands.

First up was the op. 96. Atypical for Beethoven, the op. 96 is a predominantly lyrical work — even gentle at times. Eberle and Hardink gave a nuanced reading that underscored the gorgeously crafted expressiveness and subtle twists and turns of the score. They let the music flow naturally and brought a spontaneity to their playing that was refreshing.

The Kreutzer is, of course, the most famous of the 10 violin sonatas. And musically it’s the kind of work one expects from Beethoven — bold, brazen, passionate and powerful. And the two delivered the goods. They gave a spectacular account that captured the drama and fervor of the music. They played it forcefully, but their dynamic reading nevertheless conveyed the lyricism that underlies the music, even at its fervent loudest.

Interspersed between the Beethoven were the last two Klavierstücke by the contemporary German composer Wolfgang Rihm. Hardink, who is a master of new music, gave a remarkably lucid and radiant account of the Sixth, Bagatellen, and the Seventh.

There couldn’t be two more disparate pieces than these two. The Sixth is a quiet, reflective piece that plays with the concepts of time and silence, but in a very imaginative manner. On the other hand, the Seventh, based on the opening motivic fragment of Beethoven’s last piano sonata, op. 111, is an intense, demonic statement that is rhythmically charged and driven. Its relentless energy and vitality was brought home quite forcefully by Hardink’s powerful playing. And in both cases, Hardink’s innate sense of interpretation served these two pieces well.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING THIS WEEK IN MUSIC (APRIL 15-21, 2015)

(Be sure to visit our monthly concert calendar by clicking on “Events Calendar.”)

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Jazz Ensemble, April 15, 7:30 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall in David Gardner Hall, $10 general, $6 seniors, staff, faculty, and non-U. students, free for U. students, 801-581-7100, www.kingtix.com.

CANTORUM CHAMBER CHOIR, “Greater Love,” Steve Durtschi, artistic director, program includes Gregorio Allegri’s “Miserere Mei Deus,” Paul Mealor’s “Salvator Mundi” and Eric Whitacre’s “A Boy and a Girl,” April 16, 7:30 p.m., Orem Public Library, 58 N. State St., free, suggested donation is $10,  www.cantorum.info.

NOVA CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES, Gallery Series, NOVA concludes its series of Beethoven Sonatas for Violin and Piano paired with captivating piano works by German composer Wolfgang Rihm, performed by Utah Symphony associate concertmaster Kathryn Eberle, and pianist and NOVA artistic director Jason Hardink, April 16, 7:30 p.m., Julie Nester Gallery, 1280 Iron Horse Drive, Park City, $25, tickets online or cash or checks at the door, www.novachambermusicseries.org.

EXCELLENCE IN THE COMMUNITY CONCERT SERIES, Johansen-Livengood Trio, classical viola, clarinet and piano, April 16, 7:30 p.m., Gallivan Center, free.

WESTMINSTER COLLEGE, Chamber Orchestra, “Spring Concert,” the program will feature masterworks from the classical repertoire, and a performance by the winner of the Westminster College concerto competition, April 16, 7:30 p.m., Vieve Gore Concert Hall, Emma Eccles Jones Conservatory, $5 general, Westminster staff, faculty and students get one free ticket, www.westminstercollege.edu/culturalevents.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Classical Guitar Ensemble, April 16, 7:30 p.m., Dumke Recital Hall, in David Gardner Hall, free.

WESTMINSTER OPERA STUDIO and UTAH OPERA, present internationally renowned mezzo-soprano Jill Grove in recital, Carol Anderson, piano, April 17, 7:30 p.m., Vieve Gore Concert Hall, Westminster College, $5 general, free for students with I.D., https://www.ezticketlive.com/checkout/eventbdate.asp?id=21.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Chamber Choir, April 17, 7:30 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall in David Gardner Hall, $10 general, $6 seniors, staff, faculty, and non-U. students, free for U. students, 801-581-7100, www.kingtix.com.

ORCHESTRA AT TEMPLE SQUARE and TEMPLE SQUARE CHORALE, Ryan Murphy, director, the first half of the concert will feature the orchestra performing Brahms’ Variations on a Theme by Joseph Haydn, and Smetana’s overture to The Battered Bride, the concert’s second half will be Mozart’s Requiem performed by the Temple Square Chorale, April 17-18, 7:30 p.m., Salt Lake Tabernacle, free but tickets required, for ticket information call 801-570-0080, 866-537-8457, or visit www.lds.org/events.

UTAH SYMPHONY, Masterworks Series, “Mozart’s Jupiter Symphony,” Paul Goodwin, conductor, Benedetto Lupo, piano, the concert will feature an all-Mozart program: Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major, K. 467, Symphony No. 41 in C major K. 551, Jupiter, and the Symphony in D major (after the Posthorn Serenade), K. 320, April 17-18, 8 p.m., Abravanel Hall, $10-$69 (tickets are $5 more on the day of the performance), see website or contact box office for information regarding student tickets, 801-355-2787, 888-451-2787, www.arttix.org, for further ticket information please call 801-533-6683, www.utahsymphony.org.

AMERICAN WEST CHAMBER SINGERS, Tyler Kofoed, conductor, Christy Peterson, Asha Crandall, Jonah Hoskins and Christopher Stockslager from Westminster College Department of Music, vocalists, Donna Johnson, piano, program includes Michael Haydn’s Requiem, as well as works celebrating spring, April 18, 5 p.m., Community of Grace Presbyterian Church, 2015 Newcastle Dr., Sandy, $10 general, $8 students, $5 youth (7-15 years old), at the door.

UTAH VALLEY UNIVERSITY CHAMBER CHOIR, program includes sacred, American spiritual and classical music, April 18, 7:30 p.m., Assembly Hall, Temple Square, free.

NOVA CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES, Gallery Series, NOVA concludes its series of Beethoven Sonatas for Violin and Piano paired with captivating piano works by German composer Wolfgang Rihm, performed by Utah Symphony associate concertmaster Kathryn Eberle, and pianist and NOVA artistic director Jason Hardink, April 19, 3 p.m., The Art Barn at Finch Lane, 54 Finch Lane, Salt Lake City, $25, tickets online or cash or checks at the door, www.novachambermusicseries.org.

MADELEINE FESTIVAL, Robert Sims and Christopher Brooks present “Roland Hayes: The Legacy of an American Tenor,” April 19, 8 p.m., Cathedral of the Madeleine, 331 E. South Temple, free and open to the public, www.utcotm.org.

WESTMINSTER COLLEGE, Concert Series, “An Evening of Brahms: Trio of Trios,” the concert will feature Brahms’ Clarinet Trio, Horn Trio, and Piano Trio in C, Yuki MacQueen, violin, Lee Livengood, clarinet, Ron Beitel, horn, John Eckstein, cello and Karlyn Bond, piano, April 20, 7:30 p.m., Vieve Gore Concert Hall, Westminster College, $15 general, students (from all institutions) and Westminster faculty and staff free with ID, www.westminstercollege.edu/culturalevents.

UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY, Guitar Ensembles, April 20, 7:30  p.m., The Performance Hall, $5-$10, 435-797-8022, www.arts.usu.edu.

UTAH VALLEY UNIVERSITY, Percussion UVU, “Small Plates,” enjoy our tribute to the tastiest bits of music in the percussion repertoire, the concert is sure to satisfy your musical palate, April 20, 7:30 p.m., Centre Stage, Sorensen Center Theatre, $10 general, $5 students, 801-863-7529, or box office located in Noorda Theatre, or Campus Connection, www.uvu.edu/arts.

TIMPANOGOS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, “Aspiring Musicians Competition Concert,” features works by winners of their bi-annual competition, John Pew, music director and conductor, April 20, 7:30 p.m., Thanksgiving Point Show Barn, 3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, Lehi, $10 general, $8 students, $25 family pass (up to five), 801-210-2466, www.thetso.org, or at the door.

UTAH SYMPHONY, Family Series, “Peter Pan and Other Adventures,” Vladimir Kulenovic, conductor, travel through faraway lands with the Utah Symphony, travel to Never-Never Land with Peter Pan and visit other storybook creatures told through music, April 21, 7 p.m., Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts, Weber State University, $12 general, $8 children, $36 (for 6 tickets), not available online, to purchase these tickets, please call 801-399-9214 0r visit our office at 638 26th Street, Ogden, www.symphonyballet.org.

UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY, Chorale and Women’s Choir, “Earth Day,” April 21, 7:30  p.m., The Performance Hall, $5-$10, 435-797-8022, www.arts.usu.edu.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING THIS WEEK IN THEATRE (APRIL 15-21, 2015)

(Be sure to visit our monthly theatre calendar by clicking on “Events Calendar.”)

THE ECHO THEATRE, And Then There Were None, by Agatha Christie, Hillary Straga, director, eight seemingly unrelated travelers find themselves sharing a private island house, complete with two staff members, at the wish of a mysterious benefactor, through April 18, 7:30 p.m., with a 2 p.m. matinee on April 18, 15 N. 100 East, Provo, $10 general (in advance), $12 (day of), $9 students, $8 seniors, $8 general (matinee performance), 801-375-2181, www.theechotheatre.com.

UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY, Bonnie & Clyde, book by Ivan Menchell, lyrics by Don Black, music by Frank Wildhorn, at the height of the Great Depression, Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow went from two small-town nobodies in West Texas to America’s most renowned folk heroes and law enforcement’s worst nightmare, fearless, shameless and alluring, the Tony-nominated Bonnie & Clyde tells the electrifying story of love, adventure and crime that captured the attention of an entire country, through April 18, 7:30 p.m., with a 2 p.m. matinee also on April 18, Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 West Center, Logan, $10-$18, 435-797-8022, www.arts.usu.edu.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, book by Burt Shevelove and Larry Gelbart, music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, directed by David Schmidt, Alex Marshall, music direction, when a wily, lying, lazy, cheating slave discovers that his master’s son is in love with the girl next door, he promises to help win her heart in exchange for his freedom, but the romance is blocked with stunning surprises, cunning disguises, wild chases, bawdy humor and zany characters, through April 19, 7:30 p.m., 2 p.m. matinees on April 18-19, Babcock Theatre, $18 general, $15 seniors/U. faculty/staff/military and immediate family, $8.50 students, free for U. students, 801-581-7100, www.kingtix.com.

PLAN-B THEATRE, Pilot Program, a world premiere by Melissa Leilani Larson, directed by Jerry Rapier, featuring April Fossen, Mark Fossen, and Susanna Florence Risser, what if you were called to serve in the restoration of polygamy, you could blog about it, an intimate look at first love, second wives and last chances, through April 19, 2 p.m., 4 p.m., and 8 p.m. performances, Studio Theatre, Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, $20, 801-355-2787, 888-451-2787, www.arttix.org.

HALE CENTRE THEATRE-OREM, Les Misérables, based on the novel by Victor Hugo, book by Alain Boublil and Jean-Marc Natel, music by Claude-Michel Schönberg, lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer, the musical tells the story of Jean Valjean, a runaway convict seeking redemption after serving 19 years in a prison for stealing a loaf of bread, his journey to freedom collides and converges with the lives of the worst and the best of humanity, through April 25, 7:30 p.m., also 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. matinees on Saturdays, $17-$21 general, $13-$17 children, 801-226-8600, www.haletheater.org.

UTAH CHILDREN’S THEATRE, Zorro!, at a fiesta Don Carlos wants his daughter, the beautiful Valencia, to marry Don Alejandro’s son, the charming but seemingly weak Don Diego, but treasure and treachery is in the midst of Old California, led by Captain Ramon, the bumbling Sergeant Gonzales and a mysterious figure, only Zorro can stop the greedy tyrants and bring them to justice, through April 25, 1 p.m., 4:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. performances, 3605 S. State St., $14 general, 801-532-6000, www.uctheatre.org.

SILVER SUMMIT THEATRE, Five Lesbians Eating a Quiche, regional premiere of Evan Linder and Andrew Hobgood’s frolicsome little play that ventures into everybody’s favorite absurdism, directed by Dave Hanson, in 1956 with the ever present threat of nuclear war looming over them the widows of the Susan B. Anthony Society for the Sisters of Gertrude Stein meet in a renovated community center for a special annual event, where the prize winning quiche will be declared in a much anticipated ceremony, and will they be able to keep their cool while in the midst of their beloved annual event Communists descend on their idyllic town, through April 26, 8 p.m., 4 p.m. only matinees on April 19 and 26, The Sugar Space, 616 E. Wilmington Ave., $15-$20 online, general seating available at the door, www.silversummittheatre.org.

SALT LAKE ACTING COMPANY, world premiere of Mr. Perfect, by William Missouri Downs, directed by John Caywood, the play tells the story of a quirky flight attendant and romance novel junkie who thinks she’s met Mr. Perfect, when it doesn’t work out, she sets out to connect the random events that make up life, hoping to find the meaning of it all, through May 3, 1 p.m., 2 p.m., 6 p.m., and 7:30 p.m. performances, Upstairs Theatre, 168 W. 500 North, $24-$42 general, 801-363-7522, or log on to www.saltlakeactingcompany.org.

THE ZIEGFELD THEATRE, Les Misérables, lyrics by Alain Boublil and Jean-Marc Natel, music by Claude-Michel Schönberg, English lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer, Jean Valjean is released from unjust imprisonment after 19 years, but finds nothing in store for him but mistrust and mistreatment, through May 16, 7:30 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees on Saturdays, $19 general online ($20 at the door), $17 seniors/students/children (12 and under) online ($18 at the door), 3924 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855-949-2787, www.theziegfeldtheater.com.

DESERT STAR PLAYHOUSE, Into The Hoods: A Fractured Fairy Tale, through June 6, 2:30 p.m., 6 p.m., 7 p.m., 8:30 p.m., and 9:30 p.m. performances, 4861 S. State Street, Murray, $18.95 adults, $10.95 children (11 years and under), www.desertstar.biz.

UTAH VALLEY UNIVERSITY, You Can’t Take It with You, directed by Laurie Harrop-Purser, one of the most popular and successful plays of all time, the story pits the highly eccentric Sycamore family against the uptight Kirby family, resulting in chaos, confusion, understanding, and love, April 16-18, 20-25, 7:30 p.m., with a 2 p.m. matinee also on April 25, Noorda Theatre, $12 general, $8 students, 801-863-7529, or box office located in Noorda Theatre, or Campus Connection, www.uvu.edu/arts.

PYGMALION THEATRE COMPANY, Mockingbird, by Julie Jensen, directed by Tracy Callahan, born with Asperger’s Syndrome, 11 year old Caitlin’s world is black and white, fortunately, her brother taught her which behavior to imitate so people wouldn’t think of her as weird, when she loses him to tragedy, Caitlin must learn to navigate the colors and cacophony of emotion to bring order to her chaotic world, based on a book by Kathryn Erskine, Mockingbird sees life through the eyes of autism, April 16-May 2, 7:30 p.m., also a 2 p.m. matinee on May 2, and 2 p.m. performances only on April 19 and 26, Leona Wagner Black Box, Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, $20, 801-355-2787, www.arttix.org.

UTAH VALLEY UNIVERSITY, Noorda Theatre Centre for Children and Youth, The Boy Who Loved Monsters and the Girl Who Loved Peas, directed by James Arrington, when a boy wishes for a monster, and his sister wishes for more peas, they get a pea-headed monster determined to be part of the family, April 17-18, 24, 1 p.m., Noorda Theatre, $3, 801-863-7529, or box office located in Noorda Theatre, or Campus Connection, www.uvu.edu/arts.

DRAPER HISTORIC THEATRE, Mary Poppins, a musical based on the stories of P. L. Travers and the Disney film, original music and lyrics by Richard M. Sherman, and Robert B. Sherman, book by Julian Fellowes, new songs and additional music and lyrics by George Stiles and Anthony Drewe, April 17-18, 20, 24-25, 7 p.m., with a 2 p.m. matinee also on April 18, $9 general, $7 seniors/students/military, $5 children 12 and under, all seats $5 for matinees, reserved tickets, $11 general, $9  seniors/students/military/children, 12366 S. 900 East, 801-572-4144, www.drapertheatre.org.

PLEASANT GROVE PLAYERS, The Boys Next Door, by Tom Griffin, the play shares the story of four mentally handicapped men who live in a communal residence in New England, where they are under the supervision of a very earnest social worker named Jack Norman, who is increasingly “burned out” by his work, April 17-May 4, 7:30 p.m., also a 3 p.m. matinee on May 2 (Friday, Saturday and Monday performances), Keith Christeson Theater (lower level of the Pleasant Grove Library), 30 E. Center, Pleasant Grove, $10 general, $9 seniors and students, www.pgplayers.com.

HERITAGE THEATRE, Lend Me a Tenor, by Ken Ludwig, in 1934, Saunders, the general manager of the Cleveland Grand Opera Company, is primed to welcome world famous Tito Merelli, the greatest tenor of his generation, to appear for one night only as Otello, the star arrives late and through a series of mishaps is given a double dose of tranquilizers and passes out, but everybody thinks he’s dead, so Saunders’ assistant, Max, gets into costume to pretend to be Tito, in the meantime Merelli comes to and gets into his other costume, now there are two Otellos running around,  April 17-May 9, 7:30 p.m., also a 2 p.m. matinee on April 25, $10 general, $9 seniors/children under 12, S. Highway 89, Peery, 435-723-8392, www.heritagetheatreutah.com.

SCERA CENTER, Guys and Dolls, book by Jo Swerling and Abe Burrows, music and lyrics by Frank Loesser, April 17-May 9, 7:30 p.m., $12 general, $10 seniors (65+ years) and children (ages 3-11 years), 745 S. State, Orem, 801-225-2787, www.scera.org.

HALE CENTRE THEATRE-WEST VALLEY CITY, Over the River and Through the Woods, by Joe DiPietro, in New Jersey two very loud sets of grandparents simply adore their 29-year-old grandson, when he tells them he might take a job in Seattle, they think a girl might make him stay, April 17-May 23, 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. performances, $27-$30 general, $16 children (5-11 years, no children under 5 years permitted), 801-984-9000, www.halecentretheatre.org.

TERRACE PLAZA PLAYHOUSE, Annie Get Your Gun, book by Dorothy Fields, music and lyrics by Irving Berlin, Annie Oakley is the best shot around, when she’s discovered by Buffalo Bill he persuades her to join his Wild West Show, where she falls head over heels for dashing shooting ace Frank Butler, who headlines the show, April 17-May 30, 7:30 p.m., 99 E. 4700 South, Ogden, $12-$14 general, $11-$13 seniors/students, $9-$11 children (12 and under), 801-393-0070, http://terraceplayhouse.com.

CENTERPOINT LEGACY THEATRE, Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, book by Jeffrey Lane, music and lyrics by David Yaybek, directed by Jim Christian, lying, cheating, totally dishonest, dirty, rotten, and completely hilarious, two swindlers make a bet, but end up getting a surprise of their own, this conman comedy will have you rolling in the aisles,  April 20-May 16, 7:30 p.m., Barlow Main Stage, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, $17.25-$23.25 general, 801-298-1302, www.centerpointtheatre.org.

WEBER STATE UNIVERSITY, One-Act Play Festival, April 21-25, 7:30 p.m., Eccles Theater, Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts, $10-$12, 800-978-8457, www.weberstatetickets.com.

COVEY CENTER FOR THE ARTS, Shrek, Jr., presented by the Center Stage Youth Performers, for ages 2 and up, April 21-25, 7 p.m., Main Hall, $7-$9, 801-852-7007, www.provo.org/community/covey-center-for-the-arts.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING THIS WEEK IN DANCE (APRIL 15-21, 2015)

(Be sure to visit our monthly dance calendar by clicking on “Events Calendar.”)

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Department of Modern Dance, Senior Concert, April 16, 23, 5:30 p.m., April 17-18, 24-25, 7:30 p.m., Marriott Center for Dance, $12 general, $8 students, U. students free with ID, 801-581-7100, www.kingtix.com.

PEERY’S EGYPTIAN THEATER, Imagine Ballet presents “The Secret Garden,” based on the book by Frances Hodgson Burnett, with musical score written by Kurt Bestor, and choreography by Raymond Van Mason, April 17-18, 7:30 p.m., with a 2 p.m. matinee also on April 18, 2415 Washington Blvd., Ogden, $15-$29 general, 801-689-8700, www.egyptiantheaterogden.com.

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UTAH SYMPHONY PROGRAM SHOWCASES MERCEDES SMITH

UTAH SYMPHONY, Abravanel Hall, April 10; second performance 8 p.m. April 11, tickets at 801-355-2787, 888-451-2787 or www.utahsymphony.org 

Mercedes Smith is the belle of the ball at this weekend’s Utah Symphony concerts. Two of the works on the program — Claude Debussy’s Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune and Maurice Ravel’s Daphnis et Chloé— feature the flute prominently and Smith, the orchestra’s principal, played both magnificently.

Utah Symphony principal flute Mercedes Smith (Photo: Courtesy of the artist)

She is an exquisite player, infusing the main theme of the Prélude with poetic elegance and sensitive lyricism. Smith took the opening solo languidly, which emphasized the sultry character of the music perfectly. She set the tone for the entire piece with her beautifully crafted playing and expressions. Conductor Thierry Fischer took it up and let the orchestra convey the seductiveness of the piece with his relaxed tempos and nuanced direction. It was a finely crafted reading on all accounts.

Smith once again captured the exquisitely sensual writing for her instrument in Daphnis et Chloé, particularly in the “Pantomime” scene, which in effect is a long flute solo. She played with finely molded phrasings and eloquently expressed lyricism.

Fischer programmed the entire ballet score, which in its remarkably powerful orchestration is a tour de force work for the entire ensemble. And they, along with the Utah Symphony Chorus, once again delivered the goods, playing with vitality, boldness, tender lyricism and nuanced expressions.

The many solos throughout the hour-long work spotlighted a number of players; notable among them were concertmaster Ralph Matson’s playing as well as English hornist Lissa Stolz’s contributions.

Also on the program is Igor Stravinsky’s Symphony in Three Movements. One of his best works from his later period, the symphony makes a powerful statement that undoubtedly reflects the time in which it was written (the middle of World War II). Fischer’s well conceived interpretation captured the intensity of the outer movements, the music of which is characterized by strongly accented phrasings and jarring harmonies. The slower middle movement, on the other hand, offers some contrast, but it, too, is somewhat unnerving in its effect.

The orchestra played the symphony spectacularly, with crisp articulation and precisely executed delivery that conveyed the power of the work.

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