YEFIM BRONFMAN TO PLAY WITH THE UTAH SYMPHONY THIS WEEKEND

It’s been a long time since Yefim Bronfman played in Salt Lake City. It’s taken 12 years for the Russian-born pianist to finally return to Utah, but this weekend he’ll be appearing with the Utah Symphony and Thierry Fischer playing Johannes Brahms’ imposing Second Piano Concerto. Also on the program are Igor Stravinsky’s Symphonies of Wind Instruments and Arnold Schoenberg’s Transfigured Night in his 1943 version for string orchestra.

Yefim Bronfman (Photo Credit: Dario Acosta)

In a phone interview with Reichel Recommends Bronfman talked about the concerto. “It’s very charming and beautiful. But it also has scope and dimension,” he said. It’s also longer than any concerto written up to that point (it was composed in the years 1878-81). “[Brahms] takes the concerto form into its next trajectory,” Bronfman added.

But the concerto is not just about size; there are numerous chamber-like moments spread throughout the nearly hour-long work. “It’s larger than life, but the writing is almost like opera for the piano. Throughout the piece there are a lot of duets between the piano and various instruments in the orchestra. There are hundreds of examples of this intimate element in the concerto.”

That chamber music aspect is one of the main factors that distinguishes the second concerto from the first. “The first is like a symphony,” Bronfman said. “The second has the symphonic element, too, but it also has a charming operatic element that the first one does not.”

The second is also a very demanding work, according to Bronfman. “I can’t speak for every pianist, but it is very hard. It has some of the most difficult pianistic challenges of any concerto.” He also added that frequently pianists fall into the trap of overplaying the work. “It’s easy to play it with too much bang. You have to be careful not to make it sound forced.”

Both concertos are staples of the repertoire and Bronfman said that the two are requested with the same frequency. “Both are very much in demand and I have a lot of calls for both. You know, Beethoven and Brahms are the foundation for any pianist or orchestra.”

Bronfman has recorded the Second and will record both concertos early next year with the Cleveland Orchestra and Franz Welser-Möst. “This will be live video recordings that will be released on DVD,” he said.

Throughout his long career, Bronfman has made numerous recordings and been nominated for several Grammy Awards. He won a Grammy in 1997 for his recording of the three Béla Bartók concertos with the Los Angeles Philharmonic and Esa-Pekka Salonen. His most recent recording, with the New York Philharmonic and Alan Gilbert, is a 2014 Grammy nominee. It features Magnus Lindberg’s Piano Concerto No. 2, which was commissioned for Bronfman. “We will see what happens,” he said.

  • CONCERT DETAILS
  • What: Yefim Bronfman, piano, Utah Symphony, Thierry Fischer, conductor
  • Venue: Abravanel Hall
  • Time and Date: 8 p.m. Sept. 19-20
  • Tickets: $18-$69 ($5 higher when purchased on day of performance)
  • Phone: 801-355-2787, 888-451-2787
  • Web: www.utahsymphony.org
  • ALSO:
  • Venue: Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts, Weber State University
  • Time and Date: 7:30 p.m. Sept. 18
  • Tickets: $16-$37
  • Phone: 801-399-9214
  • Web: www.symphonyballet.org 
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JOEL ROSENBERG TO CONDUCT CONCERTS IN UTAH AND GERMANY

To start its 19th season, the Paradigm Chamber Orchestra will present a program of 18th century works this Saturday. Featured soloist will be the University of Utah’s Heather Conner playing J.S. Bach’s Keyboard Concerto in D minor, BWV 1052. “Heather is a wonderful pianist,” said Paradigm music director Joel Rosenberg. “This is the first time that I’ll be working with her and I’m looking forward to it.”

Joel Rosenberg

Also on the program are two early works by Mozart, the Divertimento for Strings in F major, K. 138, and the Symphony No. 23 in D major, K. 181.

Rounding out the concert are Vivaldi’s Concerto for Bassoon, Gluck’s Dance of the Blessed Spirits and Bach’s Badinerie from the Orchestral Suite No. 2. Soloing will be Tia Jaynes, flute, and Robert Bedont, bassoon, both members of the Paradigm Chamber Orchestra and the American West Symphony. “They’re wonderful players,” Rosenberg said. “These are all pieces that they chose to play.”

Rosenberg said the music of Bach and Mozart are among the most difficult to play well, but this is a carefully chosen program that complements the Bach concerto and the Mozart symphony.

Heather Conner

A couple of weeks after the Paradigm concert, Rosenberg will leave for Germany for three weeks as part of a cultural exchange program between Sandy City and Riesa, Germany, its sister city. “This will be my first time conducting an orchestra in Europe since I conducted the Accademia di Santa Cecilia as a student. I’m very excited about this,” Rosenberg said.

In Germany, Rosenberg will conduct three concerts with the Elbland Philharmonie Sachsen, which has its home in Riesa, in the easternmost part of Saxony near the Czech border. “There will be performances in three different cities,” Rosenberg said. On Oct. 10, he and the orchestra will play in Meissen; the following evening they’ll be in Perna; and on Oct. 12 they’ll appear in Riesa.

For these concerts Rosenberg will open the program with Beethoven’s Leonore Overture No. 3. The remainder of the program will be taken up with American works. “We’ll be playing Copland’s Appalachian Spring and Dvorák’s New World Symphony, which was written while Dvorák was staying in a Czech community in Iowa,” Rosenberg said.

Kelly Richardson (Photo Credit: Tom Sparks Photography)

Rounding out the concert will be a work by American West Symphony violinist and composer Kelly Richardson, The Battle of Shiloh. “It’s a very descriptive piece about the battle,” Rosenberg said. “It’s a short work and very well written. It has compelling rhythms and melodies.”

In addition to the orchestral concerts, Rosenberg, who is also a violist, will play a chamber music concert with the concertmaster and principals of the philharmonic. “We’re doing two works by Dvorák, the Piano Quintet [in A major, op. 81] and the American Quartet [in F major, op. 96].”

There will also be some time for sightseeing, Rosenberg said. “I’ve never been to this part of Germany so I’m planning on going to Berlin, Leipzig and Dresden while I’m there.”

While Rosenberg is in Germany, the American West Orchestra will give its first concert of the season on Oct. 10-11 and Oct. 21 under guest conductor Richard Chatelain. On the program will be the first movement from Mozart’s Piano Concerto in D minor, K. 466, with teenager Anastasia Magamedova as soloist; and two Slavonic Dances by Dvorák, as well as two movements from his Symphony No. 9, From the New World. Rounding out the concert will be Cascade by American West trombonist Mark Johnston, who will conduct his piece.

  • CONCERT DETAILS
  • What: Heather Conner, piano, Paradigm Chamber Orchestra, Joel Rosenberg, conductor
  • Venue: Libby Gardner Concert Hall, University of Utah
  • Time and Date: 7:30 p.m., Sept. 20
  • Tickets: $10, at the door


  • CONCERT DETAILS: 
  • What: American West Symphony, Richard Chatelain and Mark Johnston, conductors
  • Venue: Assembly Hall on Temple Square
  • Time and Date: 7:30 p.m. Oct. 10
  • Tickets: Free
  • ALSO:
  • What: American West Symphony, Richard Chatelain and Mark Johnston, conductors
  • Venue: Butler Middle School, 7530 S. 2700 East, Cottonwood Heights
  • Time and Date: 8 p.m. Oct. 11
  • Tickets: $10, at the door
  • ALSO:
  • What: American West Symphony, Richard Chatelain and Mark Johnston, conductors
  • Venue: Libby Gardner Concert Hall, University of Utah
  • Time and Date: 7:30 p.m. Oct. 21
  • Tickets: $10, at the door, U. students free
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MARIE NELSON BENNETT’S ‘ORPHEUS LEX’ A SPLENDIDLY CRAFTED OPERA

SALT LAKE VOCAL ARTISTS, SLCA CHAMBER ORCHESTRA, Orpheus Lex, Libby Gardner Concert Hall, Sept. 13

Marie Nelson Bennett

In 2006 Utah’s venerable composer Marie Nelson Bennett wrote an opera on the Orpheus legend that was premiered in New York City four years later. The work, Orpheus Lex, finally received its Utah premiere Saturday, albeit in an abbreviated concert version, by the Salt Lake Vocal Artists under conductor Brady Allred.

The piece is a clever modern take on the Greek myth with a libretto by Salt Lake writer David Kranes. It takes place in a cabin in rural Idaho where Orpheus, instead of being forbidden to turn around to look at Eurydice as he leads her out of the Underworld, isn’t allowed to remember her. When he eventually does, the two are destined to repeat their actions; it’s an endless loop that has no resolution.

Bennett has written a score that captures the urgency of the story; the music is intense, driven, occasionally dissonant but always with an underlying current of lyricism, even in its boldest moments. It is a splendidly crafted work that is wonderfully descriptive and vivid and imaginatively orchestrated.

Allred and his singers gave a solid performance of the demanding score. They sang with finely crafted expressions and a rich, wonderfully modulate tone.

The two soloists, soprano Alisa Peterson (Eurydice) and Tyler Oliphant (Orpheus) were exceptional both in their acting and singing. They brought their characters vividly to life; their portrayals had depth and conviction, and they infused their expressive performances with a large palette of emotions.

Adding to the success of the performance was the orchestra; it played with finely crafted phrasings and cleanly defined articulation. And Anthony Buck’s stage direction made good use of the stage and the hall.

The version performed Saturday also incorporated images projected on two large screens, one on each side of the orchestra, as well as a few sound effects. There was also a narrator, Michael J. Bennett, who brought continuity to the story.

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THIERRY FISCHER RAISES THE BAR AT UTAH SYMPHONY OPENER

UTAH SYMPHONY, Abravanel Hall, Sept. 12; second performance 8 p.m. Sept. 13, tickets at 801-355-2787, 888-451-2787 or www.utahsymphony.org 

This is a weekend of firsts for the Utah Symphony and its music director — not only is it the start of the Mahler symphony cycle, but also the orchestra’s return to recording.

The main work on the program, Mahler’s First Symphony, is being recorded by Soundmirror for commercial release. This is the first recording by the Utah Symphony in many years and the first time in 40 years it has recorded this work. (Maurice Abravanel’s legendary recording was made in 1974.) Because of the sheer excellence and virtuosity exhibited by orchestra Friday evening under Thierry Fischer, one can only hope this is the beginning of a long series of recordings. (As of now, the only other recording planned is Mahler’s Eighth Symphony in February 2016.)

Thierry Fischer (Photo Credit: Lephoto)

To open the concert Fischer programmed two brief works — Alexander Mosolov’s brash The Iron Foundry and Beethoven’s theatrical Wellington’s Victory — as a warm up for the orchestra and the audience.

It was obvious right from the downbeat that Fischer had carefully prepared his score. He paid close attention to Mahler’s markings and conveyed them to the orchestra. The reading wasn’t academic in the least; instead, it was vibrant, dynamic and well defined.

And the orchestra played with clarity and precision. It was articulate and wonderfully phrased.

Fischer decided to include the original slow second movement, known today as Blumine, that Mahler omitted from later versions of the symphony. A lyrically soft piece, Fischer’s account was broad and brought out the depth and expansiveness of the music. It was a sensitively crafted reading, and the musicians played with great feeling and finely tuned phrasings.

Throughout the symphony Fischer elicited playing from his band that ranged from the sensuous to the bold — and everything in between. Among the high points was the otherworldly atmosphere that Fischer created in the funeral march fourth movement. It was eery and tantalizing. Principal bass David Yavornitzky’s solo playing to open the fourth movement was wonderful, as was principal tuba Gary Ofenloch’s solo turn.

Indeed, all of the musicians played magnificently. The expanded brass and percussion sections were superb, as were the woodwind and string players; there were many fine solo moments among them.

Since Fischer took over the reins back in 2009, the Utah Symphony’s playing has been getting more polished, refined and articulate, and Friday’s performance was without question one of its best to date. The brilliance of the playing on opening night heralded the start of what undoubtedly promises to be a stellar season.

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OLIVIA CUSTODIO MESMERIZING IN ‘LA VOIX HUMAINE’

CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES, La voix humaine, Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Sept. 10

Francis Poulenc is not known for his operas — he wrote only three — but they are among the major operatic works from the mid 20th century. Two have been staged in Utah, but not by Utah Opera — for that, one has to turn to the University of Utah. In 2010 the U.’s Lyric Opera Ensemble did a splendid production of Dialogues des Carmélites. And Wednesday, soprano Olivia Custodio, a graduate student at the U., gave a stand out performance of Poulenc’s one-woman one-acter La voix humaine.

Olivia Custodio

The 50-minute opera, based on the play of the same name by Jean Cocteau, is a dark study of a woman (referred to only as elle, “she”) who has her final conversation with her former lover via telephone. She knows the affair is over but she refuses to acknowledge it, and as the conversation progresses she becomes more desperate and agitated. It’s tragic and heart breaking to witness the woman’s mental breakdown, and Custodio gave a stellar performance. One is drawn into her world, one feels her anguish and desperation as she struggles to keep him on the line and in her life. She fails, of course. In the end, she commits suicide.

Shows with only one performer are extremely difficult to do. The focus is unwaveringly on the performer. It’s a demanding and challenging and, when done well, extremely rewarding for the performer and the audience.

That was the case with La voix humaine. Custodio owned the role. Through her considerable and impressive acting skills she brought depth, definition and clarity to her portrayal of a desperate woman who refuses to give up her lover. It was quite honestly heart wrenching to see her downward spiral.

Her singing was no less remarkable. Custodio’s voice has the power and brilliance to convey the drama convincingly, while possessing the right amount of lyricism to underscore the expressiveness of her part. It was a tour de force performance that was mesmerizing.

Stage director Lucas Goodrich made good use of the small stage area in the museum’s gallery, and Paul Dorgan’s sensitively delineated piano playing complemented Custodio’s singing and never allowed it to overshadow her.

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UTAH SYMPHONY STARTS NEW SEASON WITH MAHLER – AND RECORDING CONTRACT

Gustav Mahler

For this weekend’s Utah Symphony performances of Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No. 1, Titan, music director Thierry Fischer has been preparing more intensely than normal, not because he never has done Mahler — he has — but because both the Friday and Saturday night performances will be recorded for release later this year.

“I started studying the score and inundating myself in Mahler’s world before Christmas last year,” the maestro said in an interview with Reichel Recommends. “I wanted to better understand who he was and why he was so demanding as a conductor and why he was so hated.”

A lot is riding on how he and the orchestra perform this weekend, and Fischer has a great deal of confidence in his musicians. “We have set the bar really high and we can do it,” he said, adding that there is a mutual trust between him on the one side and the musicians and the Utah Symphony|Utah Opera organization as a whole on the other.

Fischer knows that the Utah Symphony and the symphonies of Mahler are closely connected, thanks to legendary music director Maurice Abravanel. The complete Mahler symphony recordings that Abravanel made with his orchestra for the Vanguard label have a unique position — they are the first complete cycle recorded by an American orchestra. These recordings are still widely available today on compact disc. “I know what Abravanel did here [with the Utah Symphony],” Fischer said. “Abravanel was a big reason why I came here.”

Abravanel recorded the First in 1974 using the best known version that omits the slow movement, know as Blumine. For these performances Fischer decided to go back to the original score and include Blumine,making it a five-movement work.

Thierry Fischer (Photo Credit: Scott Jarvie)

For the orchestra’s 75th anniversary, it was a given that Fischer would program all nine symphonies. “Abravanel left such a great legacy, it was only natural to go back to that and reference his legacy.” The cycle will be played over the next two seasons — the first four symphonies during this season and the remaining five in 2015-16. It’s a major undertaking, and Fischer is looking forward to it. “I am really excited about this.”

The Swiss conductor said that the tentative release date for the Mahler CD is scheduled for this Christmas. And as of this writing the deal with Soundmirror also calls for Fischer and the Utah Symphony to record their performances of Mahler’s Eighth with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, which will take place in February 2016. “That’s the plan, but who knows?” Fischer said, perhaps leaving the possibility open of a deal to record the remaining seven symphonies. “If that happens, it would take about five years to complete.” And that would also fit in with Fischer’s contract which expires in five years, at the end of the 2018-19 season.

As noted both performances this weekend will be recorded, and if needed, Fischer and the orchestra will tweak passages after the Saturday concert. “We have scheduled two 15-minute sessions Saturday. If we need more, we will add more.”

Also on the program are two works: Alexander Mosolov’s Iron Foundry and Ludwig van Beethoven’s Wellington’s Victory. “Iron Foundry is an incredibly loud piece,” Fischer said, adding that it makes a big, bold statement in only 3 1/2 minutes. Wellington’s Victory is a nod to the tradition of opening a Utah Symphony season with a piece by Beethoven. “It’s an easy, festive work that is not pretentious.”

The first half will be short, Fischer said. “It will only be about 20 minutes, because I want to focus on the Mahler.”

Fischer is upbeat and ready to start the Mahler cycle. “I’m happy and I have good vibes about this.”

  • CONCERT DETAILS
  • What: Utah Symphony, Thierry Fischer, conductor
  • Venue: Abravanel Hall
  • Time and Date: 8 p.m. Sept. 12-13
  • Tickets: $18-$69 ($5 higher when purchased on day of performance)
  • Phone: 801-355-2787 or 888-451-2787
  • Web: www.utahsymphony.org
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MARIE NELSON BENNETT’S OPERA ‘ORPHEUS LEX’ FINALLY COMES TO UTAH

Marie Nelson Bennett

Marie Nelson Bennett is without question one of the most well liked and respected figures among Utah composers. She has an extensive body of works that includes eight symphonies, five concertos and numerous chamber and choral works that have been performed and recorded here and throughout the country, as well as in Europe. Bennett has definitely done as much as any other musical figure to put the Beehive State on the map. As Brady Allred, music director of the Salt Lake Choral Artists, so aptly put it, “She is one of our treasures here.”

This Saturday, in Libby Gardner Concert Hall, Allred’s Salt Lake Vocal Artists, part of the Choral Artists’ organization, will give the western United States premiere of Bennett’s opera Orpheus Lex.

Composed in 2006 to a libretto by Salt Lake writer David Kranes, the opera takes the ancient Greek Orpheus and Eurydice legend and adds a modern twist to it. The story is set in a cabin in rural Idaho. But unlike the original legend, in which Orpheus, after fetching Eurydice from the underworld, was forbidden to turn around and look at her lest she return to Hades, lost to him forever, Kranes’ clever plotting forbids Orpheus from looking back in time. The law (lex, in Latin) states that if he remembers his wife he will lose her again. This forces the characters to come up with a number of ingenious ways to avoid remembering each other in order to stay together.

Brady Allred

“Not remembering makes it a little bit harder for the characters,” Allred said, “but all of us have tried not looking back at certain things in our lives.” It’s this element in the story that makes it relevant to the audience, he added. “We all go through different types of trauma. We learn from them, but we can’t keep going back and remembering.”

This will be a shortened concert version of the opera, although with some staging (with Anthony Buck as director) and innovative use of the stage in Gardner Hall. “There will be images projected on a screen,” Allred said. “We’re going to try and make the characters more believable and let the audience get caught up in the emotions.”

When Allred began rehearsing the opera the choir members were a little worried and concerned about being able to learn it. “Marie’s harmonies are a bit difficult to tune,” Allred said, “but when you get to know her musical language you find that it is really beautiful. She has found some really beautiful ways to express emotions and drama.”

Joining the choir will be narrator Michael J. Bennett, soprano Alisa Peterson as Eurydice and baritone Tyler Oliphant as Orpheus. Allred has worked with both singers in the past, most recently with Oliphant in Brahms’ A German Requiem this past March. “I haven’t worked with Alisa since we did [Tan Dun’s] Water Passion.” That was in 2009 with the University of Utah Singers, when Allred was director of choirs at the U.

Bennett helped choose the singers, Allred said. “Marie has been involved in the whole process [of putting the opera together for this performance]. She sat in at our rehearsals and gave us some suggestions, which we were grateful for. Working with her has made all the difference, because she gave us some invaluable insight into the work.”

This performance won’t be the exact version of Orpheus Lex that was premiered in New York City in 2010, Allred said. ”It’s going to be more cohesive, with the scenes being more connected than they were at the word premiere. We’re also shortening some of the narration. The total length of the performance will be about one hour.”

Contemporary opera can be intimidating for some people, Allred conceded. But he added that Bennett’s harmonic language is accessible. “Her music is ‘contemporary,’ but her tonal language is broad and includes elements of polytonality, neo-romanticism and Americana. I think the audience will be pleasantly surprised.”

  • PERFORMANCE DETAILS
  • What: Marie Nelson Bennett’s Orpheus Lex, with Alisa Peterson, soprano, Tyler Oliphant, baritone, and the Salt Lake Vocal Artists, Brady Allred, conductor
  • Venue: Libby Gardner Concert Hall
  • Time and Date: 7 p.m., Sept. 13
  • Tickets: $15 general, $10 students
  • Phone: 801-232-7521
  • Web: www.saltlakechoralartists.org
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FROM THE SERIOUS TO THE FANCIFUL, THE MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL KNOWS HOW TO PLEASE ITS AUDIENCE

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, Sorrel River Ranch, Star Hall, Sept. 5-7

The Moab Music Festival closed this past weekend with a flurry of concerts that ranged from the antics of Gilbert and Sullivan to the upbeat jazz of the John Pizzarelli Quartet. In between, there were works ranging from the sublime to the fanciful by composers who are household names, as well as those who have yet to find a footing among American concertgoers.

Below are reviews of the concerts.

Arnaud Sussmann (Photo: Courtesy of the artist)

Sept. 5, Sorrel River Ranch, “Freedom and Censorship: The Music of Russia and Poland.”

The program was a well balanced look at how 19th and early 20th century composers’ music was affected by society and political upheaval. The program focused on Shostakovich, Mieczyslaw Weinberg and Rimsky-Korsakoff on the Russian/Soviet side, and Chopin and Grazyna Bacevicz across the border in Poland. It was an insightful glimpse into how these composers reacted to their immediate surroundings. Shostakovich, of course, is well known for seemingly bowing to political pressure to bring more socialist realism into his music, while trying to maintain his identity and integrity as an artist. But at times he could have a little fun, as the Five Pieces, for two violins and piano, showed. These are innocuous little pieces that nevertheless have a slight undertone of darkness to them. Weinberg, a younger contemporary of Shostakovich’s whose music has been woefully neglected in this country, also tried to maintain his dignity as a composer. The Moderato con moto movement from his Piano Quintet in F minor, op. 18, is an intense piece that exhibits a wide range of emotions and a depth of expression that only Shostakovich surpasses. It’s a gorgeously crafted piece that is expansive and subtle. Rimsky-Korsakoff’s Sextet for Strings in A minor, of which the final two movements were played, is an exuberant, carefree and peppy work that overflows with optimism and high spirits — the intellectual and emotional opposite of Shostakovich and Weinberg. Also on the program were selections from Chopin’s dazzling Préludes, op. 28, that run the gamut of technical wizardry and refined expressiveness, and the first two movements from Bacevicz’s spirited and rhythmically vibrant Piano Quintet No. 1 from 1952. Performing the concert were violinists LP How, Arnaud Sussmann and Ayano Ninomiya; violists Leslie Tomkins and Max Mandel; cellists Tanya Tomkins and Jeremy Turner; and pianists Pedja Muzijevic and Eric Zivian. The nine musicians enlivened the music with their spectacular playing that put their technical acumen and impressive musicality on display. Their readings were polished and brought depth and definition, as well as subtlety, to the music. It was chamber music of the highest order.

John Pizzarelli (Photo: Courtesy of the artist)

 

Sept. 6, Sorrel River Ranch, John Pizzarelli Quartet. John Pizzarelli is no stranger to Utah. He’s played gigs in Salt Lake City for years and Saturday he entertained the large audience under the tent at the Sorrel River Ranch with nearly 2 1/2 hours of witty banter, jazz classics, tunes from the Great American Songbook and a few more contemporary pieces — it was a broad selection of songs by George and Ira Gershwin and Duke Ellington to the Beatles. There were also a couple of pieces from his recently released album, Double Exposure. Pizzarelli is a fabulous guitarist who can dazzle his listeners with his virtuosity. And when he isn’t cutting loose, he can capture a mood with his sensitive and evocative playing. Pizzarelli is also a solid vocalist who knows how to fashion a song and make it his own. His bandmates — Konrad Paszkudski, piano, Martin Pizzarelli, bass, and Kevin Kanner, drums — are also amazing artists. This is a tight knit group who knows how to play off each other. It was a fun evening that ended all too soon.

Eric Zivian (Photo: Jeanette Yu)

Sept. 7, Star Hall, “There Will Always Be an England.” The closing concert was a tribute to late 19th and early 20th century English composers. It opened with settings by Benjamin Britten of three folk songs sung by tenor Robert Breault who was accompanied by guitarist Marc Teicholz. They gave a delightful account of these pieces. Breault brought lyricism and fluid lines to his singing and Teicholz brought refined musicality to his playing. It was also, unexpectedly, staged, with the two sitting at a cafe table and pretending to choose the songs they would do. They were followed by two instrumental works: the Phantasie Trio by Alice Verne-Bredt and the first movement from Arnold Bax’s Piano Quintet in G minor. Violinist Arnaud Sussmann, cellist Jeremy Turner and pianist Eric Zivian gave an effusive reading of the single movement trio that underscored the lyricism and charm of the music. For the quintet, Zivian was joined by violinists Ayano Ninomiya and LP How, violist Leslie Tomkins and cellist Tanya Tomkins. The music is quite energetic and forceful and the five gave a bold and impassioned reading that captured the spirit and drive of the music. They played with broad gestures and finely delineated phrasings that allowed the breadth and depth of the music to come through. And to close the program there was a splendid performance of Gilbert and Sullivan’s early one act operetta, Trial by Jury. For this staged performance,

Shana Osterloh

Breault was joined by the members of the Lyric Opera Ensemble from the University of Utah, where he directs the opera program. Gilbert and Sullivan’s first big hit, Trial by Jury pokes fun at the judicial system as only these two can. The plot, revolving around a breach of promise of marriage is silly, and stage director Julie Wright-Costa, a colleague of Breault’s at the U., wisely played up the zaniness of the storyline; it was campy and fun. All of the leads gave commanding performances and sang and acted with conviction. Breault was wonderful as the Defendant, as was Jared Lesa as the Judge, David Sauer as the Counsel for the Plaintiff, Alyssa Jenks as the Usher and Makenzie Matthews as the Foreman of the Jury. But Shana Osterloh as the Plaintiff nearly stole the show —  a difficult task given the overall high quality of the singing. Osterloh has a powerful voice that is also nicely modulated, and she brought subtle nuances to her portrayal. Also in featured roles were Jenny Erickson and Marilee Wilson as the two Bridesmaids. The large chorus was also exceptional. Breault and Wright-Costa can be proud of their students, who performed on a highly professional level. Accompanying the singers was a small band consisting of violinists Paul Woodiel and Robin Zeh, flutist Christopher Layer and pianist Jeffrey Price, also from the U. This was an absolutely delightful way to end the two-week-long festival.

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MOAB FESTIVAL TO CLOSE WITH A CELEBRATION OF ENGLAND

The Moab Music Festival will formally close out its run with a concert celebrating English music on Sept. 7. On the program will be arrangements of English folk songs by Benjamin Britten, the Piano Quintet in G minor by Arnold Bax and the Phantasie Trio by Alice Verne-Bredt, a contemporary of Bax whose music today is unduly neglected.

Robert Breault

The featured work, though, is Gilbert and Sullivan’s one-act operetta Trial by Jury, the duo’s first unqualified success. Performing it will be tenor Robert Breault and members of his Utah Lyric Opera Ensemble. Directing will be Julie Wright-Costa, a colleague of Breault’s at the University of Utah’s opera department. Also taking part from the U. is pianist Jeffery Price.

“The piece is a lot of fun. It’s a spoof of everything,” Breault said in an interview with Reichel Recommends.

The plot is simple and ludicrous as only librettist William S. Gilbert could fashion. It revolves around a case of breach of promise of marriage which, after the usual antics, is finally resolved with the judge offering to marry the wronged lady himself. “None of the characters are warm hearted people,” said Breault, who sings the role of the Defendant, “but we still love them.”

This will be Breault’s first G & S role. Wright-Costa, however, has had considerable experience with the G & S repertoire through her yearly engagements at the Ohio Light Opera. “That’s why I’m excited she has accepted the job to direct,” Breault said.

Festival co-founder Michael Barrett, who will conduct the performance, wants the piece sung with an English accent, Breault said, but differently than native speakers would speak. “He wants to bring out the rhyming schemes. But we have to be careful and not overdo it, otherwise the audience will miss the clever lyrics.”

Besides being his first Gilbert and Sullivan operetta, this performance also marks Breault’s debut at the Moab festival. “Michael wanted me to do it and some other pieces on the program,” Breault said. “Up to now I’ve always avoided singing with the students.” But he added that it’s been a great experience for him and for the young singers. “It’s been a unifying experience for my class,” he said.

The production will be staged, but with minimal costumes and sets.

“This is really a great way to close the festival,” Breault said. “Trial by Jury is a nice dessert.”

Also performing on the concert will be Marc Teicholz, guitar; Ayano Ninomiya, Arnaud Susmann and Paul Woodiel, violin; LP How and Leslie Tomkins, viola; Tanya Tomkins and Jeremy Turner, cello; and Eric Zivian, piano.

  • CONCERT DETAILS
  • What: “There Will Always Be an England”
  • Venue: Star Hall, 159 E. Center St., Moab
  • Time and Date: 7 p.m. Sept. 7
  • Tickets: $30
  • Phone: 435-259-7003
  • Web: www.moabmusicfest.org

(For a schedule of events please click here.)

Posted in Articles, Concert Previews | Leave a comment

PERFORMANCES-MUSIC-SEPTEMBER 2014

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, Rocky Mountain Power Family Picnic Concert, the festival honors Canyonlands National Park’s 50th anniversary with a brand new work, Grandstaff, by Utah composer Gerald Elias, the program also includes Celtic tunes and the music of harpist Edmar Castaneda and vocalist Andrea Tierra, September 1, 2 p.m., Swanny Park, 400 N. 100 West, Moab, free, 435-259-7003, www.moabmusicfest.org, the Moab Festival runs through September 8.

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, Ranch Benefit Concert, “El Camino – The Road to Spanish Celtica,” Christopher Layer, pipes and flutes, Maeve Gilchrist, lever harp, Paul Woodiel, fiddle, and Natalie Haas, cello, September 2, 6 p.m., at a private ranch in Moab, $100, call 435-259-7003 for venue, www.moabmusicfest.org, the Moab Festival runs through September 8.

EXCELLENCE IN THE COMMUNITY CONCERT SERIES, Tad Calcara & New Deal Swing, September 2, 7:30 p.m., Gallivan Center, free.

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, House Benefit Concert, at a private home, music by Debussy, Mozart, and Fauré, September 3, 5:30 p.m., $250, contact 435-259-7003 for more information and to purchase tickets, www.moabmusicfest.org, the Moab Festival runs through September 8.

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, “Grotto Concert II,” a 45 minute jet boat ride down the Colorado River transports you to “nature’s concert hall,” a pristine, acoustically perfect wilderness grotto, music by Beethoven, Boccherini and Brahms, September 4, 12 p.m., $325, of which $190 is tax deductible, not appropriate for children under 12 years of age, 435-259-7003, www.moabmusicfest.org, the Moab Festival runs through September 8. Note: this concert is sold out, to be added to the waiting list call 435-259-7003.

UTAH CLASSICAL GUITAR SOCIETY, Gaëlle Solal, September 5, 8 p.m., Vieve Gore Concert Hall, Westminster College, $20 general, $10 students, for more information and advance tickets please visit www.ucgs.org.

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, “Freedom and Censorship: The Music of Russia and Poland,” music by Shostakovich, Chopin, Weinberg, Bacevicz and Rimsky-Korsakov, September 5, 6 p.m., Sorrel River Ranch, Mile Post 17, Highway 128, Moab, $30 general, 435-259-7003, www.moabmusicfest.org, the Moab Festival runs through September 8.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, BRAVO! Series, “An Evening with Sutton Foster,” the two-time Tony Award winner celebrates Broadway and the American songbook with a night of show tunes, jazz standards, and songs familiar and new, September 5-6, 7:30 p.m., de Jong Concert Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, $35 general ($10 off with BYU or student ID, $3 off seniors and BYU alumni), 801-422-4322, www.byuarts.com.

UTAH SYMPHONY, “Video Games Live!,” the Utah Symphony will perform along with exclusive video footage, synchronized lighting, solo performers, electronic percussionists, live action and unique interactive segments to create an explosive entertainment experience, September 6, 11 a.m. and 8 p.m. performances, $18-$85 (tickets are $5 more on the day of the performance), $15 youth tickets (18 years and under) are available for the 11 a.m. performance only,  Abravanel Hall, 801-355-2787, 888-451-2787, www.arttix.org.

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, “Open Rehearsal Conversation,” get an insider’s view of how musicians create a staged production of Gilbert and Sullivan’s Trial by Jury, in partnership with the University of Utah Opera Department, Michael Barrett, conductor, Robert Breault, tenor, LP How and Arnaud Sussmann, violin, Jeremy Turner, cello and Eric Zivian, piano, September 6, 11 a.m., Star Hall, 159 East Center Street, admission is free, however tickets are required, 435-259-7003, www.moabmusicfest.org, the Moab Festival runs through September 8.

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, “John Pizzarelli Quartet,” John Pizzarelli, guitar and vocals, Konrad Paszkudzki, piano, Martin Pizzarelli, bass, and Kevin Kanner, drums, September 6, 6 p.m., Sorrel River Ranch, Mile Post 17, Highway 128, Moab, $30, 435-259-7003, www.moabmusicfest.org, the Moab Festival runs through September 8.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Sundays@7 Faculty Spotlight, Robert Baldwin & Friends, “Going for Baroque!,” September 7, 7 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall, David Gardner Hall, free.

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, “Music Hike III,” Mark Teicholz, guitar, Dana Lyn, fiddle, Christopher Layer, pipes and flutes, Jeremy Turner, cello, a concert for the outdoor enthusiast, you will be transported to a secret wilderness location, from there a rigorous hike leads you to a natural setting for acoustic music, September 7, 9 a.m., $60, the hike requires a moderate level of stamina, agility and comfort with uneven footing, slickrock, and some exposure to sun, outdoor clothing for a desert environment is recommended, hiking or trail shoes are required, not suitable for children under 12. Contact 435-259-7003 for more information and to purchase tickets, www.moabmusicfest.org, the Moab Festival runs through September 8.

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, “Festival Finale: There Will Always Be an England,” Michael Barrett, conductor, Julie Wright-Costa, stage director, Robert Breault, tenor, Marc Teicholz, guitar, Ayano Ninomiya, Arnaud Sussmann, and Paul Woodiel, violin, Tanya Tomkins, and Jeremy Turner, cello, and Jeffrey Price and Eric Zivian, piano, music by Benjamin Britten, Alice Verne-Bredt, Arnold Bax, and Gilbert and Sullivan, September 7, 7 p.m., Star Hall, 159 East Center Street, $30 general, 435-259-7003, www.moabmusicfest.org, the Moab Festival runs through September 8.

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, “Grotto Concert III,” a 45 minute jet boat ride down the Colorado River transports you to “nature’s concert hall,” a pristine, acoustically perfect wilderness grotto, music by Bach, September 8, 12 p.m., $325, of which $190 is tax deductible, not appropriate for children under 12 years of age, 435-259-7003, www.moabmusicfest.org, the Moab Festival runs August 28-September 8. Note: this concert is sold out, to be added to the waiting list call 435-259-7003.

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, “Musical River Raft Trip,” a 4-day 3-night custom raft trip, the experience of a lifetime, the trip begins with a grotto concert, rafting on the Colorado River, daily concerts, an exhilarating run of the Class III and IV rapids of world-famous Cataract Canyon, and then jet boat for the final leg of the trip to Hite Marina at Lake Powell to catch a scenic flight over Canyonlands National Park and the Colorado River, September 8, 12 p.m., $2,100, Note: this concert is sold out, to be added to the waiting list call 435-259-7003, www.moabmusicfest.org.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, Group For New Music, September 9, 7:30 p.m., Madsen Recital Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, free.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Chamber Music Series, “La voix humaine,” by Poulenc, Olivia Custodio, soprano, accompanied by Paul Dorgan, piano, Lucas Goodrich, director, September 10, 7 p.m., Utah Museum of Fine Art, free.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, Deseret Piano Trio, September 10, 7:30 p.m., Madsen Recital Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, free.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, “9/11 Memorial Concert,” LeAnn Morgan, violin, Scott Holden, piano, Laura Candland, narrator, music by Hindemith, Christian Asplund, Shostakovich, September 11, 7:30 p.m., Madsen Recital Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, free.

OQUIRRH MOUNTAIN SYMPHONY, “Memorial Tribute Concert to 9/11,” the outdoor concert memorializes the rebuilding of the World Trade Center complex after the destruction on 9/11, and celebrates the public opening of One World Trade Center in 2014, program features premiere of Symphonic Poem: Voices by Shane Mickelsen, who will also be the evening’s guest conductor, September 11, 7:30 p.m., North Shore in Daybreak, Daybreak Lake, South Jordan, free.

UTAH SYMPHONY, Masterworks Series, “Mahler’s Symphony No. 1,” Thierry Fischer, conductor, music by Mosolov, Beethoven and Mahler, September 12-13, 8 p.m., Abravanel Hall, $18-$69 (tickets are $5 more on the day of the performance), see website or contact box office for information regarding student tickets, 801-355-2787, 888-451-2787, www.arttix.org.

SALT LAKE CHORAL ARTISTS, Utah premiere of Orpheus Lex, by Marie Nelson Bennett, libretto by David Kranes, with Alisa Peterson, soprano, Tyler Oliphant, baritone, and Michael J. Bennett, narrator, Brady Allred, conductor, originally a two-act full length opera, this performance will be presented as a multimedia concert, September 13, 7 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall, David Gardner Hall, $15 general, $10 students, 801-232-7521, www.saltlakechoralartists.org.

JAZZSLC, Monty Alexander and the Harlem Kingston Express, September 13, 7:30 p.m., Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, $25.00 – $35.00 general, $10 students, 801-355-2787, www.arttix.org.

EXCELLENCE IN THE COMMUNITY CONCERT SERIES, Yuneun Carillo & Mariachi Sol de Jalisco, September 13, 7 p.m., Viridian Center, 8030 S. 1825 West, free.

NOVA CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES, free community thank you concert, featuring NOVA musicians and friends, including percussionists Keith Carrick and Eric Hopkins, and violinists Hasse Borup and Kasia Sokol-Borup, September 14, 3 p.m., Memory Grove and Memorial House, 300 N. Canyon Rd., free lawn seating, $25 VIP seating and a post concert reception in Memorial House, www.novaslc.org.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Sundays@7 Faculty Spotlight, Eleanore Christman Cox, cello, with Caleb Harris, piano, September 14, 7 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall, David Gardner Hall, free.

ECCLES ORGAN FESTIVAL, dedicated to the memory of Brigham Young University organist and musicologist Douglas E. Bush, who passed away in December 2013, performing will be organists Andrew Lloyd of First United Methodist Church in Denton, Texas, and Robert August of First Presbyterian Church in Fort Worth Texas, both of whom were students of Douglas Bush, September 14, 8 p.m., Cathedral of the Madeleine, 331 E. South Temple, free, no seating passes required, 801-328-8941, www.utcotm.org.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Guest Artist Alexander Tselyakov, piano, September 17, 7:30 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall, David Gardner Hall, free.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Utah Philharmonia, Robert Baldwin, conductor, September 18, 7:30 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall, David Gardner Hall, $10 general, $6 students/seniors/U. faculty/staff, free for U. students, 801-581-7100, www.kingtix.com.

EXCELLENCE IN THE COMMUNITY CONCERT SERIES, Joe Muscolino Band, September 18, 7:30 p.m., Gallivan Center, free.

UTAH SYMPHONY, presented by The Ogden Symphony Ballet Association, Masterworks Series, “Bronfman Plays Brahms,” Thierry Fischer, conductor, Yefim Bronfman, piano, music by Stravinsky, Schoenberg and Brahms, September 18, 7:30 p.m., Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts, Weber State University, $16-$37, for more information and tickets, www.symphonyballet.org.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, Faculty Artist Kerilyn Johnson, vocalist, September 19, 7:30 p.m., Nelke Theatre, Harris Fine Arts Center, free.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, Sundance Trio, September 19, 7:30 p.m., Madsen Recital Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, free.

UTAH SYMPHONY, Masterworks Series, “Bronfman Plays Brahms,” Thierry Fischer, conductor, Yefim Bronfman, piano, music by Stravinsky, Schoenberg and Brahms, September 19-20, 8 p.m., Abravanel Hall, $18-$69 (tickets are $5 more on the day of the performance), see website or contact box office for information regarding student tickets, 801-355-2787, 888-451-2787, www.arttix.org.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Chamber Concert, Heather Conner, piano, with Paradigm Chamber Orchestra, Joel Rosenberg, conductor, music by Mozart., Gluck, Bach and Vivaldi, September 20, 7:30 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall, David Gardner Hall, $10.

UTAH CHAMBER ARTISTS, Collage Concert, “Crossings,” Barlow Bradford, music director and conductor, with guest artists Gabriele Terrone, organist, Jared Pierce, piano, and Michelle Dean, soprano, lighting design by Chip Dance, the concert will showcase the compellingly emotional Passion & Resurrection, by Latvian composer Eriks Esenvalds, September 22-23, 8:00 p.m., Cathedral of the Madeleine, 331 E. South Temple, free, no tickets required, www.utahchamberartists.org.

UTAH WIND SYMPHONY, Season Opener, sponsored by Legacy Music Alliance, Scott Hagen, music director, with guest artist Timothy McAllister, saxophone, September 23, 7:30 p.m., Corner Canyon High School, 12943 South 700 East, Draper, concert is free however tickets are required, www.utahwindsymphony.org.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, American Piano Quartet, Robin Hancock, Scott Holden, Jeffrey Shumway, and Del Parkinson, piano, September 24, 7:30 p.m., de Jong Concert Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, $6 general, www.byuarts.com.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Wind Ensemble, September 24, 7:30 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall, David Gardner Hall, $10 general, $6 students/seniors/U. faculty/staff, free for U. students, 801-581-7100, www.kingtix.com.

UTAH SYMPHONY, presented by The Ogden Symphony Ballet Association, Entertainment Series, Doc Severinsen, “Solid Gold,” September 25, 7:30 p.m., Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts, Weber State University, $26-$44, for more information and tickets, www.symphonyballet.org.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, BRAVO! Series, Nishat Khan, sitar, transcending musical barriers with his spellbinding expression and technical mastery, standing at the threshold of the future of sitar and Indian music, September 25, 7:30 p.m., Madsen Recital Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, $13 general ($6 off with BYU or student ID, $3 off seniors and BYU alumni), 801-422-4322, www.byuarts.com.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, BYU Choir Showcase, September 25-26, 7:30 p.m., de Jong Concert Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, $6 general ($10 off with BYU or student ID, $3 off seniors and BYU alumni), 801-422-4322, www.byuarts.com.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, Guest Artist David Korevaar, piano, September 26, 7:30 p.m., Madsen Recital Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, free.

WEBER STATE UNIVERSITY, Weber State Faculty Chamber Music Festival, September 23, 3 p.m., Garrison Choral Room, Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts, $6-$7, 800-978-8457, www.weberstatetickets.com.

UTAH SYMPHONY, Entertainment Series, “Doc Severinsen: Solid Gold,” Doc Severinsen, conductor, September 26-27, 8 p.m., Abravanel Hall, $18-$85 (tickets are $5 more on the day of the performance), see website or contact box office for information regarding student tickets, 801-355-2787, 888-451-2787, www.arttix.org.

SALT LAKE SYMPHONY, Season Opener, “Celebrating Ten Years,” Robert Baldwin, music director and conductor, includes music by Shostakovich and Leonard Bernstein, September 27, 7:30 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall, University of Utah, $10 general, $5 students and seniors, 801-531-7501 or at the door with cash, check or credit card, www.saltlakesymphony.org.

PEERY’S EGYPTIAN THEATER, “The Sarod Project,” Amjad Ali Khan, sarod virtuoso, Amaan Ali Khan, Ayaan Ali Khan, sarod, Issa Malluf, Arabic/Middle Eastern percussion, and Anubrata Chatterjee, tabla, September 27, 7 p.m., Peery’s Egyptian Theater, 2415 Washington Blvd., Ogden, $20-$75, www.smithstix.com.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Sundays@7 Faculty Spotlight, Ning and Jie Lu with Wen Yuan Gu and Yuxi Liu, September 28, 7 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall, David Gardner Hall, free.

WESTMINSTER COLLEGE, Concert Series, Westminster faculty join with local professionals in a diverse array of 20th century works by Martinu, Proto, Poulenc, Barber, Britten and Crumb, performers will be Yuki MacQueen, Julie Edwards, Pegsoon Whang, Tom Zera, Sally Humphreys, Susan Swidnicki, Lee Livengood, Jennifer Rhodes, Steve Proser, Kimi Kawashima and Karlyn Bond, September 29, 7:30 p.m., Vieve Gore Concert Hall, Westminster College, free.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, Sundance Trio, Geralyn Giovannetti, oboe, Christian Smith, bassoon, Jed Moss, piano, September 29, 7:30 p.m., Madsen Recital Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, free.UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY, Fry Street Quartet, music by Mozart, Bartók, and Schumann, September 30, 7:30 p.m., The Performance Hall, Chase Fine Arts Center, $8- $10 general, USU students free with ID, 435-797-8022, www.arts.usu.edu.

UTAH SYMPHONY, 55th Annual “Salute to Youth, Vladimir Kulenovic, conductor, September 30, 7 p.m., Abravanel Hall, $6-$18, 801-355-2787, 888-451-2787, www.utahsymphony.org.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Guest Artist Doug Smith, September 30, 7:30 p.m., Dumke Recital Hall, David Gardner Hall, free.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, BYU Jazz Showcase, September 30, 7:30 p.m., de Jong Concert Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, $6 general, 801-422-4322, www.byuarts.com.

Posted in Articles, EVENTS CALENDAR, Upcoming Concerts | Leave a comment

PERFORMANCES-THEATRE-SEPTEMBER 2014

PICKLEVILLE PLAYHOUSE, Who Shot Juanito Bandito? Reimagined, musical comedy by T.J. Davis, the infamous El Bandito is only one heist away from completing his quest to rob every bank in the Western Territories and cement his reputation as the baddest bad guy in history, through September 6, 8 p.m., also 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. matinees, 2049 S. Bear Lake Blvd., Garden City, $19.50 adults, $14.50 children (show only), $13.95 adults, $9.95 children (dinner only), $33.45 adults, $24.45 children (dinner and show), 435-946-2918, www.picklevilleplayhouse.com.

THE OFF BROADWAY THEATRE, Downton Dead, by Rusty and Sunny Bringhurst and Eric R. Jensen, a twist on two of the most popular and iconic television series of our time, it’s about what happens when the characters from an upper class family of aristocrats collide with a zombie apocalypse, through September 6, 7:30 p.m., 272 S. Main, $10-$16, 801-355-4628, www.theobt.org.

CENTERPOINT LEGACY THEATRE, Peter Pan, lyrics by Carolyn Leigh, Betty Comden and Adolph Green, music by Mark Charlap and Jule Styne, directed by Jim Christian, Peter Pan spends his never-ending childhood adventuring on a small island as leader of his gang, the Lost Boys; the show’s adventures begin when Peter teaches Wendy and her brothers how to fly and takes them on a magical adventure to Never-Never-Land, through September 6, 7:30 p.m., also 2:30 p.m. matinee on September 6, Barlow Main Stage, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, $17-$22 general, 801-298-1302, www.centerpointtheatre.org.

HERITAGE THEATRE, The King and I, by Rodgers and Hammerstein, through September 13, 7:30 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinee on September 13, $10 general, $9 seniors/children under 12 , S. Highway 89, Peery, TIX, 435-723-8392, www.heritagetheatreutah.com.

HALE CENTRE THEATRE-OREM, Beau Jest, by James Sherman, Sarah’s parents just want her to settle down and get married, but convinced that they will disapprove of her secret boyfriend she hires an actor named Bob to pretend to be the nice Jewish boy of her parents’ dreams, through September 20, 7:30 p.m., also 3 p.m. matinees on Saturdays, 225 W. 400 North, $16-$22 general, $12-$18 children, 801-226-8600, www.haletheater.org.

TERRACE PLAZA PLAYHOUSE, High School Musical, through September 20, 7:30 p.m., 99 E. 4700 South, Ogden, $7-$12, 801-393-0070, http://terraceplayhouse.com.

HALE CENTRE THEATRE-WEST VALLEY CITY, She Loves Me, book by Joe Masteroff, lyrics by Sheldon Harnick, music by Jerry Bock, through September 27, 7:30 p.m., also 12:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. matinees, $27 general, $16 children ages 5-11 years, 801-984-9000, www.halecentretheatre.org.

UTAH SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, Twelfth Night, by William Shakespeare, directed by David Ivers, Orsino loves Olivia, who won’t give him the time of day; Olivia loves Viola, whom she thinks is a boy; Viola loves Orsino, who doesn’t know she’s a girl; Malvolio loves being in love and Andrew, Toby Belch and Maria love life to its fullest; it’s all rollicking confusion, but in the end this hilarious cast of characters does find love when they least expect it, through October 17, 8 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees (7:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. matinees in September and October) Randall L. Jones Theatre, 351 W. Center St., Cedar City, $32-$73, 800-752-9849, www.bard.org.

DESERT STAR PLAYHOUSE, Dracula: He’s So Vein!, through November 8, 6 p.m., 7 p.m., 8:30 p.m., also 11:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. matinees, $18.95 adults, $10.95 children (11 years and under), 4861 S. State, 801-266-2600, www.desertstar.biz.

WEBER STATE UNIVERSITY CULTURAL AFFAIRS, Julian Sands’ A Celebration of Harold Pinter, an evening of Homeric theater with an extraordinary actor, great words and an audience, devoid of pretension or glittery trappings, this is an exploration of the man through his poetry rather than his plays, September 5, 7:30 p.m., $20 general, $15 students, Allred Theater, Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts, 801-626-7000, www.wsuculturalaffairs.org or www.weberstatetickets.com.

THE ZIEGFELD THEATER, The Producers, by Mel Brooks and Thomas Meehan, lyrics by Mel Brooks, music by Mel Brooks and arranged by Glen Kelly and Doug Besterman, the show is about two theatrical producers who scheme to get rich by overselling interests in a Broadway flop, September 5-6, 7:30 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinee on September 6, 3934 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, $15 general, $12 seniors/students/children, 855-944-2787, www.zigarts.com.

WESTMINSTER COLLEGE, Classical Greek Theatre Festival, Hecuba, by Euripides, translated by Marianne McDonald, directed by Barbara Smith, as the Greeks are heading home following the Trojan War this tragedy depicts the grief of Hecuba, queen of the fallen city of Troy, over the sacrifice of her daughter Polyxena and the revenge she takes over the added loss of her son Polydorus, September 5-6, 7:30 p.m., Courage Theatre, $15, free for Westminster College community, 801-832-2457, www.westminstercollege.edu/greek_theatre.

PINNACLE ACTING COMPANY, a reading of The Duchess of Malfi, by John Webster, directed by Alexandra Harbold, John Webster’s great Jacobean drama, detailing the fiendish schemes of two brothers who desire their wealthy sister’s title and estates, ends with a bloody and horrifying climax, September 6, 7:30 p.m., Jewett Center for the Performing Arts, Westminster College, free, www.pinnacleactingcompany.org.

UTAH CHILDREN’S THEATRE, Digestible Shakespeare, a follow up to UCT’s award winning play and audience favorite, Breakfast with Shakespeare, a troupe of theatre actors will take the audience on a path through Shakespeare’s plays, geared towards newbies, Shakespeare’s language and poetry is mixed up with modern day English and summarizes action for a quick paced theatrical experience, September 6, 13, 20, 26-27, 11 a.m., 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. performances, 3605 S. State St., $10, 801-532-6000, www.uctheatre.org.

UTAH VALLEY UNIVERSITY, Murder in the Cathedral, by T.S. Eliot, directed by Benjamin Henderson and Lisa Edwards, a President’s Freshman Reading Program Theatre Production, Archbishop Thomas Becket speaks fatal words before he is martyred, based on the murder of the Archbishop of Canterbury in 1170, September 10-16, 5 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinee on September 13, UVU Sorensen Courtyard, $5 general, $3 students, 801-863-6939, http://www.uvu.edu/theatre/.

WASATCH THEATRE COMPANY, The Color Purple, book by Marsha Norman, music and lyrics by Brenda Russell, Allee Willis and Stephen Bray, based on the novel by Alice Walker, the story is about hope, a testament to the healing power of love and ultimately a celebration of life, September 11-13, 8 p.m., September 18-19, 8 p.m., September 20, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., September 25-27, 8 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinee on September 27, Studio Theatre, Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, $20, 801-355-2787, www.arttix.org.

SCERA CENTER, Utah Valley premiere of The Addams Family, book by Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice, music and lyrics by Andrew Lippa, directed by Shawn Mortensen, Wednesday Addams, the ultimate princess of darkness, has grown up and fallen in love with a sweet, smart young man from a respectable family, her father, Gomez, must keep this secret from his beloved wife Morticia, September 12-October 4, 7:30 p.m., 745 S. State, Orem, $12 general, $10 seniors/children, 801-225-2787, www.scera.org.

EGYPTIAN THEATRE, The Producers, by Mel Brooks and Thomas Meehan, lyrics by Mel Brooks, music by Mel Brooks  and arranged by Glen Kelly and Doug Besterman, presented by the Ziegfeld Theatre Company of Ogden, the show is about two theatrical producers who scheme to get rich by overselling interests in a Broadway flop, September 12-20, 8 p.m., with 6 p.m. only performance on September 14, 328 Main St., Park City, $35 advance, $40 at the door, $43 front of house advance, $48 at the door, $55 cabaret seats advance, $60 at the door, 435-649-9371, www.egyptiantheatrecompany.org.

PIONEER THEATRE COMPANY, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, conceived by Rebecca Feldman, book by Rachel Sheinkin, music and lyrics by William Finn, additional material by Jay Reiss, a hilarious tale of high school aged overachievers, their hopes and their angst as they compete for a slot in the National Spelling Bee, September 12-27, 7:30 p.m. or 8 p.m. performances with 2 p.m. matinees on September 13, 20 and 27, $38-$59 (tickets will be $5 higher when purchased on day of performance), 801-581-7100, www.pioneertheatre.org.

THE GRAND THEATRE, Forever Plaid, by Stuart Ross, directed by Jim Christian, when four young singers are killed in a car crash they posthumously take the stage in one final gig in this goofy 1950s nostalgia trip, September 12-27, 7:30 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees, The Grand Theatre, Salt Lake Community College, 1575 S. State St., $10-$18, 801-957-3322, www.the-grand.org.

O.C. TANNER AMPHITEATHER, Classical Greek Theatre Festival, Hecuba, by Euripides, translated by Marianne McDonald, directed by Barbara Smith, as the Greeks are heading home following the Trojan War this tragedy depicts the grief of Hecuba, queen of the fallen city of Troy, over the sacrifice of her daughter Polyxena and the revenge she takes over the added loss of her son Polydorus, September 13, 8:30 p.m., 300 W. Lion Blvd., Springdale, $5 for ZArts member, $10 for non members, http://zarts.org/wp/2014/05/classical-greek-theater-euripides-hecuba/.

WEBER STATE UNIVERSITY, Classical Greek Theatre Festival, Hecuba, by Euripides, translated by Marianne McDonald, directed by Barbara Smith, as the Greeks are heading home following the Trojan War this tragedy depicts the grief of Hecuba, queen of the fallen city of Troy, over the sacrifice of her daughter Polyxena and the revenge she takes over the added loss of her son Polydorus, September 17, 7:30 p.m., Wildcat Theatre, Shepherd Union Building, $10 general, $8 students, 801-626-7000, www.weberstatetickets.com.

UTAH SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, Boeing Boeing, by Marc Camoletti, translated by Beverley Cross and Francis Evans, directed by Christopher L. Moore, Bernard is engaged to Gloria and to Gabriella and to Gretchen; the playboy bachelor is living the life and juggling three gorgeous flight attendants, but his supersonic lifestyle goes into a tailspin when flight schedules change and all three ladies arrive at his apartment on the same evening, September 17-October 18, 7:30 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees, Randall L. Jones Theatre, 351 W. Center St., Cedar City, $32-$73, 800-752-9849, www.bard.org.

UTAH SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, adapted by Steven Dietz, based on the original 1899 play by William Gillette and Arthur Conan Doyle, directed by James R. Sullivan, could this be Sherlock Holmes’ final case and could the logical detective who has survived poison, pistols and other predicaments actually be laid low by his love for a woman – Professor Moriarty thinks so, September 18-October 18, 7:30 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees, Randall L. Jones Theatre, 351 W. Center St., Cedar City, $32-$73, 800-752-9849, www.bard.org.

BABCOCK THEATRE, Blue Stockings, by Jessica Swale, directed by James Bonas, set in 1896 at Girton College in Cambridge, England, the play is a moving, comical, eye opening story of four young women fighting for their education against the backdrop of women’s suffrage, September 19-28, 7:30 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees September 27-28, $18 general, $15 U. faculty/staff/seniors/military and immediate family, $8.50 students, lower level of Simmons Pioneer Memorial Theatre, University of Utah, 801-581-7100, www.kingsburyhall.utah.edu.

THE STING AND HONEY COMPANY, The Private Ear, by Peter Shaffer, the play is a bittersweet and emotionally charged examination of the fine line between the muse and the objectified woman, directed by Javen Tanner, September 19-October 4, 7:30 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees on September 20 and 27 and October 4, Leona Wagner Black Box, Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, $20, 801-355-2787 or 888-451-2787, www.arttix.org.

CENTERPOINT LEGACY THEATRE, The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged), by Adam Long, Daniel Singer and Jess Winfield, directed by Josh Richardson, this fast-firing comedy parodies all of the Shakespeare plays, plus the sonnets, with only three performers in two acts, clever use of some interesting costumes also adds to the fun, September 19-October 11, 7 p.m., Leishman Performance Hall, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, $15 general, 801-298-1302, www.centerpointtheatre.org.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, Classical Greek Theatre Festival, Hecuba, by Euripides, translated by Marianne McDonald, directed by Barbara Smith, as the Greeks are heading home following the Trojan War this tragedy depicts the grief of Hecuba, queen of the fallen city of Troy, over the sacrifice of her daughter Polyxena and the revenge she takes over the added loss of her son Polydorus, September 22, 5 p.m., de Jong Concert Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, $11 general, $10 seniors/BYU alumni, $8 students/BYU employees, 801-422-4322, www.arts.byu.edu.

BROADWAY ACROSS AMERICA, Nice Work If You Can Get It, A New Musical Comedy, book by Joe DiPietro, music and lyrics by George and Ira Gershwin, directed by Kathleen Marshall, September 23-25, 7:30 p.m., September 26, 8 p.m., September 27, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., September 28, 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m., Capitol Theatre, tickets go on sale September 5, 800-259-5840, www.broadwayinutah.com.

UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY, Bus Stop, by William Inge, directed by Richie Call, September 23-27, 7:30 p.m., with a 2 p.m. matinee on September 27, Caine Lyric Theatre, 23 West Center, Logan, $8- $13 general, USU students free with ID, 435-797-8022, www.arts.usu.edu.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, Much Ado About Nothing, by William Shakespeare, a witty comedy of love, honor and deception comes to vibrant life on a bare stage by five actors with credits from revered British institutions such as the Royal Shakespeare Company, the Royal National Theatre and Shakespeare’s Globe, September 25-26, 7:30 p.m., September 27, 2 p.m., Mary Lou Fulton Plaza, Joseph F. Smith Building (outdoor courtyard), $20 general, $17 seniors/BYU alumni, $13 all students with ID, 801-422-4322, www.arts.byu.edu.

UTAH VALLEY UNIVERSITY, Blood Wedding, by Federico Garcia Lorca, directed by Lisa Hagen-Hall, two families in a semi-mythical rural Spain are intricately bound in an unbreakable cycle of murder and revenge, the death-bound love triangle at the center of the play fuels these passions to a fever pitch and propels the story to its unstoppable tragic conclusion, September 25-October 11, 7:30 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinee on October 11, Noorda Theatre, $12 general, $8 students, 801-863-6939, http://www.uvu.edu/theatre/.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, BYU Young Company, The Fisherman and His Wife, a participatory play adapted by Larry and Vivian Snipes, based on a story collected by the Brothers Grimm, a tale of a fisherman, an enchanted fish and three magic wishes that taps into the imagination through clever storytelling and audience participation, September 26, October 1-3, 8-10, 7 p.m., also 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. matinees on September 27 and October 11, also 10 a.m. children’s school performance on October 10, ASL interpreted performance on October 2, Nelke Theatre, Harris Fine Arts Center, $7, 801-422-4322, www.arts.byu.edu.

THE OFF BROADWAY THEATRE, Dracula vs. the Mummy, by Eric R. Jensen, the fanged count battles another undead monster who is all wrapped up in his goal of capturing the people of Salt Lake City, September 26-November 1, 7:30 p.m., 272 S. Main, $10-$16, 801-355-4628, www.theobt.org.

CENTERPOINT LEGACY THEATRE, Jekyll & Hyde, book by Leslie Bricusse, lyrics by Frank Wildhorn, Leslie Bricusse and Steve Cuden, music by Frank Wildhorn, directed by Scott Montgomery, the story is about a brilliant doctor whose experiments with human personality create a murderous counterpart; convinced the cure for his father’s mental illness lies in the separation of Man’s evil nature from his good, Dr. Henry Jekyll unwittingly unleashed his own dark side, wreaking havoc in the streets of late 19th century London as the savage, maniacal Edward Hyde, September 29-October 25, 7:30 p.m., also 2:30 p.m. matinees on October 18 and 25, Barlow Main Stage, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, $17-$22 general, 801-298-1302, www.centerpointtheatre.org.

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PERFORMANCES-DANCE-SEPTEMBER 2014

loveDANCEmore, “The Penguin Lady,” Natosha Washington, choreographer, Natosha has choreographed for 17 Utah dancers and crafted a piece that explores their individual and collective identities while challenging notions of beauty and acceptance, September 4-6, 8 p.m., Leona Wagner Black Box, Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, $20 general, no babes in arms, recommended for ages 8 and up, all patrons must have a ticket regardless of age, 801-355-2787, www.arttix.org.

REPERTORY DANCE THEATRE, “Ring Around the Rose,” RDT’s Ring Around the Rose is a “wiggle-friendly” series of performances that introduce children to the arts:

  • September 13, Black Box Theatre, RDT, “Can you draw a dance?,” dance draw and discover the arts with dancers and friends;
  • October 11, Black Box Theatre, “African Drums,” learn new dance moves and pick up a new beat in the most hands-on show;
  • November 8, Jeanné Wagner Theatre, Tanner Dance, celebrate the art of modern dance as some of Utah’s most talented young dancers take the stage;
  • December 13, Black Box Theatre, South Valley Creative Dance, enjoy the holiday season with a fun dance perf0rmance;
  • January 10, 2015, Ballet West, Jeanné Wagner Theatre, experience the life of a prima ballerina and find out what it’s really like to dance on those tippy toes;
  • February 14, 2015, Spy Hop Productions/Utah Film Center, explore the fascinating world of film and movies with the experts, watch and participate in filmmaking first hand;
  • March 14, 2015, The Mundi Project/Gina Bachauer;
  • April 11, 2015, University of Utah Youth Theatre, Utah’s premier young actor training program performs musical theatre hits;  
  • May 9, 2015, Hatch Magic and Music, enjoy an enchanting performance of magic accompanied by piano and violin.

All shows begin at 11:00 a.m., at the Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, $5 (children 2 and under free), 801-355-2787, www.arttix.org, season tickets/flex package tickets are $4, and can be purchased directly from RDT, www.rdtutah.org,

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, The Department of Dance presents, “Evidance,” September 17-20, 7:30 p.m. with a 2 p.m. matinee on September 20, de Jong Concert Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, $8-15 general, 801-422-4322, www.byuarts.com.

ODYSSEY DANCE THEATRE, “Thriller!,” a ghoulish dance of monsters and maniacs, creeps and clowns, September 26-28, October 2-5, Thursdays and Fridays 7:30 p.m., Saturdays 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., Sundays 6 p.m., Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, $25-$43, 435-649-9371, www.egyptiantheatrecompany.org.

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