MOAB FESTIVAL TO CLOSE WITH A CELEBRATION OF ENGLAND

The Moab Music Festival will formally close out its run with a concert celebrating English music on Sept. 7. On the program will be arrangements of English folk songs by Benjamin Britten, the Piano Quintet in G minor by Arnold Bax and the Phantasie Trio by Alice Verne-Bredt, a contemporary of Bax whose music today is unduly neglected.

Robert Breault

The featured work, though, is Gilbert and Sullivan’s one-act operetta Trial by Jury, the duo’s first unqualified success. Performing it will be tenor Robert Breault and members of his Utah Lyric Opera Ensemble. Directing will be Julie Wright-Costa, a colleague of Breault’s at the University of Utah’s opera department. Also taking part from the U. is pianist Jeffery Price.

“The piece is a lot of fun. It’s a spoof of everything,” Breault said in an interview with Reichel Recommends.

The plot is simple and ludicrous as only librettist William S. Gilbert could fashion. It revolves around a case of breach of promise of marriage which, after the usual antics, is finally resolved with the judge offering to marry the wronged lady himself. “None of the characters are warm hearted people,” said Breault, who sings the role of the Defendant, “but we still love them.”

This will be Breault’s first G & S role. Wright-Costa, however, has had considerable experience with the G & S repertoire through her yearly engagements at the Ohio Light Opera. “That’s why I’m excited she has accepted the job to direct,” Breault said.

Festival co-founder Michael Barrett, who will conduct the performance, wants the piece sung with an English accent, Breault said, but differently than native speakers would speak. “He wants to bring out the rhyming schemes. But we have to be careful and not overdo it, otherwise the audience will miss the clever lyrics.”

Besides being his first Gilbert and Sullivan operetta, this performance also marks Breault’s debut at the Moab festival. “Michael wanted me to do it and some other pieces on the program,” Breault said. “Up to now I’ve always avoided singing with the students.” But he added that it’s been a great experience for him and for the young singers. “It’s been a unifying experience for my class,” he said.

The production will be staged, but with minimal costumes and sets.

“This is really a great way to close the festival,” Breault said. “Trial by Jury is a nice dessert.”

Also performing on the concert will be Marc Teicholz, guitar; Ayano Ninomiya, Arnaud Susmann and Paul Woodiel, violin; LP How and Leslie Tomkins, viola; Tanya Tomkins and Jeremy Turner, cello; and Eric Zivian, piano.

  • CONCERT DETAILS
  • What: “There Will Always Be an England”
  • Venue: Star Hall, 159 E. Center St., Moab
  • Time and Date: 7 p.m. Sept. 7
  • Tickets: $30
  • Phone: 435-259-7003
  • Web: www.moabmusicfest.org

(For a schedule of events please click here.)

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PERFORMANCES-MUSIC-SEPTEMBER 2014

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, Rocky Mountain Power Family Picnic Concert, the festival honors Canyonlands National Park’s 50th anniversary with a brand new work, Grandstaff, by Utah composer Gerald Elias, the program also includes Celtic tunes and the music of harpist Edmar Castaneda and vocalist Andrea Tierra, September 1, 2 p.m., Swanny Park, 400 N. 100 West, Moab, free, 435-259-7003, www.moabmusicfest.org, the Moab Festival runs through September 8.

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, Ranch Benefit Concert, “El Camino – The Road to Spanish Celtica,” Christopher Layer, pipes and flutes, Maeve Gilchrist, lever harp, Paul Woodiel, fiddle, and Natalie Haas, cello, September 2, 6 p.m., at a private ranch in Moab, $100, call 435-259-7003 for venue, www.moabmusicfest.org, the Moab Festival runs through September 8.

EXCELLENCE IN THE COMMUNITY CONCERT SERIES, Tad Calcara & New Deal Swing, September 2, 7:30 p.m., Gallivan Center, free.

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, House Benefit Concert, at a private home, music by Debussy, Mozart, and Fauré, September 3, 5:30 p.m., $250, contact 435-259-7003 for more information and to purchase tickets, www.moabmusicfest.org, the Moab Festival runs through September 8.

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, “Grotto Concert II,” a 45 minute jet boat ride down the Colorado River transports you to “nature’s concert hall,” a pristine, acoustically perfect wilderness grotto, music by Beethoven, Boccherini and Brahms, September 4, 12 p.m., $325, of which $190 is tax deductible, not appropriate for children under 12 years of age, 435-259-7003, www.moabmusicfest.org, the Moab Festival runs through September 8. Note: this concert is sold out, to be added to the waiting list call 435-259-7003.

UTAH CLASSICAL GUITAR SOCIETY, Gaëlle Solal, September 5, 8 p.m., Vieve Gore Concert Hall, Westminster College, $20 general, $10 students, for more information and advance tickets please visit www.ucgs.org.

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, “Freedom and Censorship: The Music of Russia and Poland,” music by Shostakovich, Chopin, Weinberg, Bacevicz and Rimsky-Korsakov, September 5, 6 p.m., Sorrel River Ranch, Mile Post 17, Highway 128, Moab, $30 general, 435-259-7003, www.moabmusicfest.org, the Moab Festival runs through September 8.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, BRAVO! Series, “An Evening with Sutton Foster,” the two-time Tony Award winner celebrates Broadway and the American songbook with a night of show tunes, jazz standards, and songs familiar and new, September 5-6, 7:30 p.m., de Jong Concert Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, $35 general ($10 off with BYU or student ID, $3 off seniors and BYU alumni), 801-422-4322, www.byuarts.com.

UTAH SYMPHONY, “Video Games Live!,” the Utah Symphony will perform along with exclusive video footage, synchronized lighting, solo performers, electronic percussionists, live action and unique interactive segments to create an explosive entertainment experience, September 6, 11 a.m. and 8 p.m. performances, $18-$85 (tickets are $5 more on the day of the performance), $15 youth tickets (18 years and under) are available for the 11 a.m. performance only,  Abravanel Hall, 801-355-2787, 888-451-2787, www.arttix.org.

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, “Open Rehearsal Conversation,” get an insider’s view of how musicians create a staged production of Gilbert and Sullivan’s Trial by Jury, in partnership with the University of Utah Opera Department, Michael Barrett, conductor, Robert Breault, tenor, LP How and Arnaud Sussmann, violin, Jeremy Turner, cello and Eric Zivian, piano, September 6, 11 a.m., Star Hall, 159 East Center Street, admission is free, however tickets are required, 435-259-7003, www.moabmusicfest.org, the Moab Festival runs through September 8.

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, “John Pizzarelli Quartet,” John Pizzarelli, guitar and vocals, Konrad Paszkudzki, piano, Martin Pizzarelli, bass, and Kevin Kanner, drums, September 6, 6 p.m., Sorrel River Ranch, Mile Post 17, Highway 128, Moab, $30, 435-259-7003, www.moabmusicfest.org, the Moab Festival runs through September 8.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Sundays@7 Faculty Spotlight, Robert Baldwin & Friends, “Going for Baroque!,” September 7, 7 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall, David Gardner Hall, free.

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, “Music Hike III,” Mark Teicholz, guitar, Dana Lyn, fiddle, Christopher Layer, pipes and flutes, Jeremy Turner, cello, a concert for the outdoor enthusiast, you will be transported to a secret wilderness location, from there a rigorous hike leads you to a natural setting for acoustic music, September 7, 9 a.m., $60, the hike requires a moderate level of stamina, agility and comfort with uneven footing, slickrock, and some exposure to sun, outdoor clothing for a desert environment is recommended, hiking or trail shoes are required, not suitable for children under 12. Contact 435-259-7003 for more information and to purchase tickets, www.moabmusicfest.org, the Moab Festival runs through September 8.

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, “Festival Finale: There Will Always Be an England,” Michael Barrett, conductor, Julie Wright-Costa, stage director, Robert Breault, tenor, Marc Teicholz, guitar, Ayano Ninomiya, Arnaud Sussmann, and Paul Woodiel, violin, Tanya Tomkins, and Jeremy Turner, cello, and Jeffrey Price and Eric Zivian, piano, music by Benjamin Britten, Alice Verne-Bredt, Arnold Bax, and Gilbert and Sullivan, September 7, 7 p.m., Star Hall, 159 East Center Street, $30 general, 435-259-7003, www.moabmusicfest.org, the Moab Festival runs through September 8.

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, “Grotto Concert III,” a 45 minute jet boat ride down the Colorado River transports you to “nature’s concert hall,” a pristine, acoustically perfect wilderness grotto, music by Bach, September 8, 12 p.m., $325, of which $190 is tax deductible, not appropriate for children under 12 years of age, 435-259-7003, www.moabmusicfest.org, the Moab Festival runs August 28-September 8. Note: this concert is sold out, to be added to the waiting list call 435-259-7003.

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL, “Musical River Raft Trip,” a 4-day 3-night custom raft trip, the experience of a lifetime, the trip begins with a grotto concert, rafting on the Colorado River, daily concerts, an exhilarating run of the Class III and IV rapids of world-famous Cataract Canyon, and then jet boat for the final leg of the trip to Hite Marina at Lake Powell to catch a scenic flight over Canyonlands National Park and the Colorado River, September 8, 12 p.m., $2,100, Note: this concert is sold out, to be added to the waiting list call 435-259-7003, www.moabmusicfest.org.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, Group For New Music, September 9, 7:30 p.m., Madsen Recital Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, free.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Chamber Music Series, “La voix humaine,” by Poulenc, Olivia Custodio, soprano, accompanied by Jed Moss, piano, Lucas Goodrich, director, September 10, 7 p.m., Utah Museum of Fine Art, free.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, Deseret Piano Trio, September 10, 7:30 p.m., Madsen Recital Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, free.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, “9/11 Memorial Concert,” LeAnn Morgan, violin, Scott Holden, piano, Laura Candland, narrator, music by Hindemith, Christian Asplund, Shostakovich, September 11, 7:30 p.m., Madsen Recital Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, free.

OQUIRRH MOUNTAIN SYMPHONY, “Memorial Tribute Concert to 9/11,” the outdoor concert memorializes the rebuilding of the World Trade Center complex after the destruction on 9/11, and celebrates the public opening of One World Trade Center in 2014, program features premiere of Symphonic Poem: Voices by Shane Mickelsen, who will also be the evening’s guest conductor, September 11, 7:30 p.m., North Shore in Daybreak, Daybreak Lake, South Jordan, free.

UTAH SYMPHONY, Masterworks Series, “Mahler’s Symphony No. 1,” Thierry Fischer, conductor, music by Mosolov, Beethoven and Mahler, September 12-13, 8 p.m., Abravanel Hall, $18-$69 (tickets are $5 more on the day of the performance), see website or contact box office for information regarding student tickets, 801-355-2787, 888-451-2787, www.arttix.org.

SALT LAKE CHORAL ARTISTS, Utah premiere of Oedipus Lex, by Marie Nelson Bennett, libretto by David Kranes, with Alisa Peterson, soprano, Tyler Oliphant, baritone, and Michael J. Bennett, narrator, Brady Allred, conductor, originally a two-act full length opera, this performance will be presented as a multimedia concert, September 13, 7 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall, David Gardner Hall, $15 general, $10 students, 801-232-7521, www.saltlakechoralartists.org.

JAZZSLC, Monty Alexander and the Harlem Kingston Express, September 13, 7:30 p.m., Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, $25.00 – $35.00 general, $10 students, 801-355-2787, www.arttix.org.

EXCELLENCE IN THE COMMUNITY CONCERT SERIES, Yuneun Carillo & Mariachi Sol de Jalisco, September 13, 7 p.m., Viridian Center, 8030 S. 1825 West, free.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Sundays@7 Faculty Spotlight, Eleanore Christman Cox, cello, with Caleb Harris, piano, September 14, 7 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall, David Gardner Hall, free.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Guest Artist Alexander Tselyakov, piano, September 17, 7:30 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall, David Gardner Hall, free.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Utah Philharmonia, Robert Baldwin, conductor, September 18, 7:30 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall, David Gardner Hall, $10 general, $6 students/seniors/U. faculty/staff, free for U. students, 801-581-7100, www.kingtix.com.

EXCELLENCE IN THE COMMUNITY CONCERT SERIES, Joe Muscolino Band, September 18, 7:30 p.m., Gallivan Center, free.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, Faculty Artist Kerilyn Johnson, vocalist, September 19, 7:30 p.m., Nelke Theatre, Harris Fine Arts Center, free.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, Sundance Trio, September 19, 7:30 p.m., Madsen Recital Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, free.

UTAH SYMPHONY, Masterworks Series, “Bronfman Plays Brahms,” Thierry Fischer, conductor, Yefim Bronfman, piano, music by Stravinsky, Schoenberg and Brahms, September 19-20, 8 p.m., Abravanel Hall, $18-$69 (tickets are $5 more on the day of the performance), see website or contact box office for information regarding student tickets, 801-355-2787, 888-451-2787, www.arttix.org.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Chamber Concert, Heather Connor, piano, with Paradigm Orchestra, Joel Rosenberg, conductor, music by Mozart., Gluck, Bach and Vivaldi, September 20, 7:30 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall, David Gardner Hall, $10.

UTAH CHAMBER ARTISTS, Collage Concert, “Crossings,” Barlow Bradford, music director and conductor, with guest artists Gabriele Terrone, organist, Jared Pierce, piano, and Michelle Dean, soprano, lighting design by Chip Dance, the concert will showcase the compellingly emotional Passion & Resurrection, by Latvian composer Eriks Esenvalds, September 22-23, 8:00 p.m., Cathedral of the Madeleine, 331 E. South Temple, free, no tickets required, www.utahchamberartists.org.

UTAH WIND SYMPHONY, Season Opener, sponsored by Legacy Music Alliance, Scott Hagen, music director and conductor, September 23, 7:30 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall, David Gardner Hall, University of Utah $12 general, $6 students, 801-355-2787 or 888-451-2787, www.arttix.org.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, American Piano Quartet, Robin Hancock, Scott Holden, Jeffrey Shumway, and Del Parkinson, piano, September 24, 7:30 p.m., de Jong Concert Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, $6 general, www.byuarts.com.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Wind Ensemble, September 24, 7:30 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall, David Gardner Hall, $10 general, $6 students/seniors/U. faculty/staff, free for U. students, 801-581-7100, www.kingtix.com.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, BRAVO! Series, Nishat Khan, sitar, transcending musical barriers with his spellbinding expression and technical mastery, standing at the threshold of the future of sitar and Indian music, September 25, 7:30 p.m., Madsen Recital Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, $13 general ($6 off with BYU or student ID, $3 off seniors and BYU alumni), 801-422-4322, www.byuarts.com.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, BYU Choir Showcase, September 25-26, 7:30 p.m., de Jong Concert Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, $6 general ($10 off with BYU or student ID, $3 off seniors and BYU alumni), 801-422-4322, www.byuarts.com.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, Guest Artist David Korevaar, piano, September 26, 7:30 p.m., Madsen Recital Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, free.

WEBER STATE UNIVERSITY, Weber State Faculty Chamber Music Festival, September 23, 3 p.m., Garrison Choral Room, Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts, $6-$7, 800-978-8457, www.weberstatetickets.com.

UTAH SYMPHONY, Entertainment Series, “Doc Severinsen: Solid Gold,” Doc Severinsen, conductor, September 26-27, 8 p.m., Abravanel Hall, $18-$85 (tickets are $5 more on the day of the performance), see website or contact box office for information regarding student tickets, 801-355-2787, 888-451-2787, www.arttix.org.

SALT LAKE SYMPHONY, Season Opener, “Celebrating Ten Years,” Robert Baldwin, music director and conductor, includes music by Shostakovich and Leonard Bernstein, September 27, 7:30 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall, University of Utah, $10 general, $5 students and seniors, 801-531-7501 or at the door with cash, check or credit card, www.saltlakesymphony.org.

PEERY’S EGYPTIAN THEATER, “The Sarod Project,” Amjad Ali Khan, sarod virtuoso, Amaan Ali Khan, Ayaan Ali Khan, sarod, Issa Malluf, Arabic/Middle Eastern percussion, and Anubrata Chatterjee, tabla, September 27, 7 p.m., Peery’s Egyptian Theater, 2415 Washington Blvd., Ogden, $20-$75, www.smithstix.com.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Sundays@7 Faculty Spotlight, Ning and Jie Lu with Wen Yuan Gu and Yuxi Liu, September 28, 7 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall, David Gardner Hall, free.

WESTMINSTER COLLEGE, Concert Series, Westminster faculty join with local professionals in a diverse array of 20th century works by Martinu, Proto, Poulenc, Barber, Britten and Crumb, performers will be Yuki MacQueen, Julie Edwards, Pegsoon Whang, Tom Zera, Sally Humphreys, Susan Swidnicki, Lee Livengood, Jennifer Rhodes, Steve Proser, Kimi Kawashima and Karlyn Bond, September 29, 7:30 p.m., Vieve Gore Concert Hall, Westminster College, free.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, Sundance Trio, Geralyn Giovannetti, oboe, Christian Smith, bassoon, Jed Moss, piano, September 29, 7:30 p.m., Madsen Recital Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, free.UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY, Fry Street Quartet, music by Mozart, Bartók, and Schumann, September 30, 7:30 p.m., The Performance Hall, Chase Fine Arts Center, $8- $10 general, USU students free with ID, 435-797-8022, www.arts.usu.edu.

UTAH SYMPHONY, 55th Annual “Salute to Youth, Vladimir Kulenovic, conductor, September 30, 7 p.m., Abravanel Hall, $6-$18, 801-355-2787, 888-451-2787, www.utahsymphony.org.

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Guest Artist Doug Smith, September 30, 7:30 p.m., Dumke Recital Hall, David Gardner Hall, free.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, BYU Jazz Showcase, September 30, 7:30 p.m., de Jong Concert Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, $6 general, 801-422-4322, www.byuarts.com.

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PERFORMANCES-THEATRE-SEPTEMBER 2014

PICKLEVILLE PLAYHOUSE, Who Shot Juanito Bandito? Reimagined, musical comedy by T.J. Davis, the infamous El Bandito is only one heist away from completing his quest to rob every bank in the Western Territories and cement his reputation as the baddest bad guy in history, through September 6, 8 p.m., also 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. matinees, 2049 S. Bear Lake Blvd., Garden City, $19.50 adults, $14.50 children (show only), $13.95 adults, $9.95 children (dinner only), $33.45 adults, $24.45 children (dinner and show), 435-946-2918, www.picklevilleplayhouse.com.

THE OFF BROADWAY THEATRE, Downton Dead, by Rusty and Sunny Bringhurst and Eric R. Jensen, a twist on two of the most popular and iconic television series of our time, it’s about what happens when the characters from an upper class family of aristocrats collide with a zombie apocalypse, through September 6, 7:30 p.m., 272 S. Main, $10-$16, 801-355-4628, www.theobt.org.

CENTERPOINT LEGACY THEATRE, Peter Pan, lyrics by Carolyn Leigh, Betty Comden and Adolph Green, music by Mark Charlap and Jule Styne, directed by Jim Christian, Peter Pan spends his never-ending childhood adventuring on a small island as leader of his gang, the Lost Boys; the show’s adventures begin when Peter teaches Wendy and her brothers how to fly and takes them on a magical adventure to Never-Never-Land, through September 6, 7:30 p.m., also 2:30 p.m. matinee on September 6, Barlow Main Stage, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, $17-$22 general, 801-298-1302, www.centerpointtheatre.org.

HERITAGE THEATRE, The King and I, by Rodgers and Hammerstein, through September 13, 7:30 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinee on September 13, $10 general, $9 seniors/children under 12 , S. Highway 89, Peery, TIX, 435-723-8392, www.heritagetheatreutah.com.

HALE CENTRE THEATRE-OREM, Beau Jest, by James Sherman, Sarah’s parents just want her to settle down and get married, but convinced that they will disapprove of her secret boyfriend she hires an actor named Bob to pretend to be the nice Jewish boy of her parents’ dreams, through September 20, 7:30 p.m., also 3 p.m. matinees on Saturdays, 225 W. 400 North, $16-$22 general, $12-$18 children, 801-226-8600, www.haletheater.org.

TERRACE PLAZA PLAYHOUSE, High School Musical, through September 20, 7:30 p.m., 99 E. 4700 South, Ogden, $7-$12, 801-393-0070, http://terraceplayhouse.com.

HALE CENTRE THEATRE-WEST VALLEY CITY, She Loves Me, book by Joe Masteroff, lyrics by Sheldon Harnick, music by Jerry Bock, through September 27, 7:30 p.m., also 12:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. matinees, $27 general, $16 children ages 5-11 years, 801-984-9000, www.halecentretheatre.org.

UTAH SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, Twelfth Night, by William Shakespeare, directed by David Ivers, Orsino loves Olivia, who won’t give him the time of day; Olivia loves Viola, whom she thinks is a boy; Viola loves Orsino, who doesn’t know she’s a girl; Malvolio loves being in love and Andrew, Toby Belch and Maria love life to its fullest; it’s all rollicking confusion, but in the end this hilarious cast of characters does find love when they least expect it, through October 17, 8 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees (7:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. matinees in September and October) Randall L. Jones Theatre, 351 W. Center St., Cedar City, $32-$73, 800-752-9849, www.bard.org.

DESERT STAR PLAYHOUSE, Dracula: He’s So Vein!, through November 8, 6 p.m., 7 p.m., 8:30 p.m., also 11:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. matinees, $18.95 adults, $10.95 children (11 years and under), 4861 S. State, 801-266-2600, www.desertstar.biz.

WEBER STATE UNIVERSITY CULTURAL AFFAIRS, Julian Sands’ A Celebration of Harold Pinter, an evening of Homeric theater with an extraordinary actor, great words and an audience, devoid of pretension or glittery trappings, this is an exploration of the man through his poetry rather than his plays, September 5, 7:30 p.m., $20 general, $15 students, Allred Theater, Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts, 801-626-7000, www.wsuculturalaffairs.org or www.weberstatetickets.com.

THE ZIEGFELD THEATER, The Producers, by Mel Brooks and Thomas Meehan, lyrics by Mel Brooks, music by Mel Brooks and arranged by Glen Kelly and Doug Besterman, the show is about two theatrical producers who scheme to get rich by overselling interests in a Broadway flop, September 5-6, 7:30 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinee on September 6, 3934 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, $15 general, $12 seniors/students/children, 855-944-2787, www.zigarts.com.

WESTMINSTER COLLEGE, Classical Greek Theatre Festival, Hecuba, by Euripides, translated by Marianne McDonald, directed by Barbara Smith, as the Greeks are heading home following the Trojan War this tragedy depicts the grief of Hecuba, queen of the fallen city of Troy, over the sacrifice of her daughter Polyxena and the revenge she takes over the added loss of her son Polydorus, September 5-6, 7:30 p.m., Courage Theatre, $15, free for Westminster College community, 801-832-2457, www.westminstercollege.edu/greek_theatre.

PINNACLE ACTING COMPANY, a reading of The Duchess of Malfi, by John Webster, directed by Alexandra Harbold, John Webster’s great Jacobean drama, detailing the fiendish schemes of two brothers who desire their wealthy sister’s title and estates, ends with a bloody and horrifying climax, September 6, 7:30 p.m., Jewett Center for the Performing Arts, Westminster College, free, www.pinnacleactingcompany.org.

UTAH CHILDREN’S THEATRE, Digestible Shakespeare, a follow up to UCT’s award winning play and audience favorite, Breakfast with Shakespeare, a troupe of theatre actors will take the audience on a path through Shakespeare’s plays, geared towards newbies, Shakespeare’s language and poetry is mixed up with modern day English and summarizes action for a quick paced theatrical experience, September 6, 13, 20, 26-27, 11 a.m., 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. performances, 3605 S. State St., $10, 801-532-6000, www.uctheatre.org.

UTAH VALLEY UNIVERSITY, Murder in the Cathedral, by T.S. Eliot, directed by Benjamin Henderson and Lisa Edwards, a President’s Freshman Reading Program Theatre Production, Archbishop Thomas Becket speaks fatal words before he is martyred, based on the murder of the Archbishop of Canterbury in 1170, September 10-16, 5 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinee on September 13, UVU Sorensen Courtyard, $5 general, $3 students, 801-863-6939, http://www.uvu.edu/theatre/.

WASATCH THEATRE COMPANY, The Color Purple, book by Marsha Norman, music and lyrics by Brenda Russell, Allee Willis and Stephen Bray, based on the novel by Alice Walker, the story is about hope, a testament to the healing power of love and ultimately a celebration of life, September 11-13, 8 p.m., September 18-19, 8 p.m., September 20, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., September 25-27, 8 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinee on September 27, Studio Theatre, Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, $20, 801-355-2787, www.arttix.org.

EGYPTIAN THEATRE, The Producers, by Mel Brooks and Thomas Meehan, lyrics by Mel Brooks, music by Mel Brooks  and arranged by Glen Kelly and Doug Besterman, presented by the Ziegfeld Theatre Company of Ogden, the show is about two theatrical producers who scheme to get rich by overselling interests in a Broadway flop, September 12-20, 8 p.m., with 6 p.m. only performance on September 14, 328 Main St., Park City, $35 advance, $40 at the door, $43 front of house advance, $48 at the door, $55 cabaret seats advance, $60 at the door, 435-649-9371, www.egyptiantheatrecompany.org.

PIONEER THEATRE COMPANY, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, conceived by Rebecca Feldman, book by Rachel Sheinkin, music and lyrics by William Finn, additional material by Jay Reiss, a hilarious tale of high school aged overachievers, their hopes and their angst as they compete for a slot in the National Spelling Bee, September 12-27, 7:30 p.m. or 8 p.m. performances with 2 p.m. matinees on September 13, 20 and 27, $38-$59 (tickets will be $5 higher when purchased on day of performance), 801-581-7100, www.pioneertheatre.org.

THE GRAND THEATRE, Forever Plaid, by Stuart Ross, directed by Jim Christian, when four young singers are killed in a car crash they posthumously take the stage in one final gig in this goofy 1950s nostalgia trip, September 12-27, 7:30 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees, The Grand Theatre, Salt Lake Community College, 1575 S. State St., $10-$18, 801-957-3322, www.the-grand.org.

O.C. TANNER AMPHITEATHER, Classical Greek Theatre Festival, Hecuba, by Euripides, translated by Marianne McDonald, directed by Barbara Smith, as the Greeks are heading home following the Trojan War this tragedy depicts the grief of Hecuba, queen of the fallen city of Troy, over the sacrifice of her daughter Polyxena and the revenge she takes over the added loss of her son Polydorus, September 13, 8:30 p.m., 300 W. Lion Blvd., Springdale, $5 for ZArts member, $10 for non members, http://zarts.org/wp/2014/05/classical-greek-theater-euripides-hecuba/.

WEBER STATE UNIVERSITY, Classical Greek Theatre Festival, Hecuba, by Euripides, translated by Marianne McDonald, directed by Barbara Smith, as the Greeks are heading home following the Trojan War this tragedy depicts the grief of Hecuba, queen of the fallen city of Troy, over the sacrifice of her daughter Polyxena and the revenge she takes over the added loss of her son Polydorus, September 17, 7:30 p.m., Wildcat Theatre, Shepherd Union Building, $10 general, $8 students, 801-626-7000, www.weberstatetickets.com.

UTAH SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, Boeing Boeing, by Marc Camoletti, translated by Beverley Cross and Francis Evans, directed by Christopher L. Moore, Bernard is engaged to Gloria and to Gabriella and to Gretchen; the playboy bachelor is living the life and juggling three gorgeous flight attendants, but his supersonic lifestyle goes into a tailspin when flight schedules change and all three ladies arrive at his apartment on the same evening, September 17-October 18, 7:30 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees, Randall L. Jones Theatre, 351 W. Center St., Cedar City, $32-$73, 800-752-9849, www.bard.org.

UTAH SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, adapted by Steven Dietz, based on the original 1899 play by William Gillette and Arthur Conan Doyle, directed by James R. Sullivan, could this be Sherlock Holmes’ final case and could the logical detective who has survived poison, pistols and other predicaments actually be laid low by his love for a woman – Professor Moriarty thinks so, September 18-October 18, 7:30 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees, Randall L. Jones Theatre, 351 W. Center St., Cedar City, $32-$73, 800-752-9849, www.bard.org.

BABCOCK THEATRE, Blue Stockings, by Jessica Swale, directed by James Bonas, set in 1896 at Girton College in Cambridge, England, the play is a moving, comical, eye opening story of four young women fighting for their education against the backdrop of women’s suffrage, September 19-28, 7:30 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees September 27-28, $18 general, $15 U. faculty/staff/seniors/military and immediate family, $8.50 students, lower level of Simmons Pioneer Memorial Theatre, University of Utah, 801-581-7100, www.kingsburyhall.utah.edu.

CENTERPOINT LEGACY THEATRE, The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged), by Adam Long, Daniel Singer and Jess Winfield, directed by Josh Richardson, this fast-firing comedy parodies all of the Shakespeare plays, plus the sonnets, with only three performers in two acts, clever use of some interesting costumes also adds to the fun, September 19-October 11, 7 p.m., Leishman Performance Hall, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, $15 general, 801-298-1302, www.centerpointtheatre.org.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, Classical Greek Theatre Festival, Hecuba, by Euripides, translated by Marianne McDonald, directed by Barbara Smith, as the Greeks are heading home following the Trojan War this tragedy depicts the grief of Hecuba, queen of the fallen city of Troy, over the sacrifice of her daughter Polyxena and the revenge she takes over the added loss of her son Polydorus, September 22, 5 p.m., de Jong Concert Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, $11 general, $10 seniors/BYU alumni, $8 students/BYU employees, 801-422-4322, www.arts.byu.edu.

BROADWAY ACROSS AMERICA, Nice Work If You Can Get It, A New Musical Comedy, book by Joe DiPietro, music and lyrics by George and Ira Gershwin, directed by Kathleen Marshall, September 23-25, 7:30 p.m., September 26, 8 p.m., September 27, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., September 28, 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m., Capitol Theatre, tickets go on sale September 5, 800-259-5840, www.broadwayinutah.com.

 

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, Much Ado About Nothing, by William Shakespeare, a witty comedy of love, honor and deception comes to vibrant life on a bare stage by five actors with credits from revered British institutions such as the Royal Shakespeare Company, the Royal National Theatre and Shakespeare’s Globe, September 25-26, 7:30 p.m., September 27, 2 p.m., Mary Lou Fulton Plaza, Joseph F. Smith Building (outdoor courtyard), $20 general, $17 seniors/BYU alumni, $13 all students with ID, 801-422-4322, www.arts.byu.edu.

UTAH VALLEY UNIVERSITY, Blood Wedding, by Federico Garcia Lorca, directed by Lisa Hagen-Hall, two families in a semi-mythical rural Spain are intricately bound in an unbreakable cycle of murder and revenge, the death-bound love triangle at the center of the play fuels these passions to a fever pitch and propels the story to its unstoppable tragic conclusion, September 25-October 11, 7:30 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinee on October 11, Noorda Theatre, $12 general, $8 students, 801-863-6939, http://www.uvu.edu/theatre/.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, BYU Young Company, The Fisherman and His Wife, a participatory play adapted by Larry and Vivian Snipes, based on a story collected by the Brothers Grimm, a tale of a fisherman, an enchanted fish and three magic wishes that taps into the imagination through clever storytelling and audience participation, September 26, October 1-3, 8-10, 7 p.m., also 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. matinees on September 27 and October 11, also 10 a.m. children’s school performance on October 10, ASL interpreted performance on October 2, Nelke Theatre, Harris Fine Arts Center, $7, 801-422-4322, www.arts.byu.edu.

THE OFF BROADWAY THEATRE, Dracula vs. the Mummy, by Eric R. Jensen, the fanged count battles another undead monster who is all wrapped up in his goal of capturing the people of Salt Lake City, September 26-November 1, 7:30 p.m., 272 S. Main, $10-$16, 801-355-4628, www.theobt.org.

CENTERPOINT LEGACY THEATRE, Jekyll & Hyde, book by Leslie Bricusse, lyrics by Frank Wildhorn, Leslie Bricusse and Steve Cuden, music by Frank Wildhorn, directed by Scott Montgomery, the story is about a brilliant doctor whose experiments with human personality create a murderous counterpart; convinced the cure for his father’s mental illness lies in the separation of Man’s evil nature from his good, Dr. Henry Jekyll unwittingly unleashed his own dark side, wreaking havoc in the streets of late 19th century London as the savage, maniacal Edward Hyde, September 29-October 25, 7:30 p.m., also 2:30 p.m. matinees on October 18 and 25, Barlow Main Stage, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, $17-$22 general, 801-298-1302, www.centerpointtheatre.org.

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PERFORMANCES-DANCE-SEPTEMBER 2014

loveDANCEmore, “The Penguin Lady,” Natosha Washington, choreographer, Natosha has choreographed for 17 Utah dancers and crafted a piece that explores their individual and collective identities while challenging notions of beauty and acceptance, September 4-6, 8 p.m., Leona Wagner Black Box, Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, $20 general, no babes in arms, recommended for ages 8 and up, all patrons must have a ticket regardless of age, 801-355-2787, www.arttix.org.

REPERTORY DANCE THEATRE, “Ring Around the Rose,” RDT’s Ring Around the Rose is a “wiggle-friendly” series of performances that introduce children to the arts:

  • September 13, Black Box Theatre, RDT, “Can you draw a dance?,” dance draw and discover the arts with dancers and friends;
  • October 11, Black Box Theatre, “African Drums,” learn new dance moves and pick up a new beat in the most hands-on show;
  • November 8, Jeanné Wagner Theatre, Tanner Dance, celebrate the art of modern dance as some of Utah’s most talented young dancers take the stage;
  • December 13, Black Box Theatre, South Valley Creative Dance, enjoy the holiday season with a fun dance perf0rmance;
  • January 10, 2015, Ballet West, Jeanné Wagner Theatre, experience the life of a prima ballerina and find out what it’s really like to dance on those tippy toes;
  • February 14, 2015, Spy Hop Productions/Utah Film Center, explore the fascinating world of film and movies with the experts, watch and participate in filmmaking first hand;
  • March 14, 2015, The Mundi Project/Gina Bachauer;
  • April 11, 2015, University of Utah Youth Theatre, Utah’s premier young actor training program performs musical theatre hits;  
  • May 9, 2015, Hatch Magic and Music, enjoy an enchanting performance of magic accompanied by piano and violin.

All shows begin at 11:00 a.m., at the Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, $5 (children 2 and under free), 801-355-2787, www.arttix.org, season tickets/flex package tickets are $4, and can be purchased directly from RDT, www.rdtutah.org,

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, The Department of Dance presents, “Evidance,” September 17-20, 7:30 p.m. with a 2 p.m. matinee on September 20, de Jong Concert Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center, $8-15 general, 801-422-4322, www.byuarts.com.

ODYSSEY DANCE THEATRE, “Thriller!,” a ghoulish dance of monsters and maniacs, creeps and clowns, September 26-28, October 2-5, Thursdays and Fridays 7:30 p.m., Saturdays 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., Sundays 6 p.m., Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, $25-$43, 435-649-9371, www.egyptiantheatrecompany.org.

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MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL EVENT SCHEDULE

Below is a listing of all concerts and events at the Moab Music Festival, which runs Aug. 28-Sept. 8. For more information or to order tickets call the festival office at 435-259-7003 or log on to www.moabmusicfest.org.

  • Aug. 28, 12 p.m., “Grotto Concert I.” A 45 minute jet boat ride down the Colorado River that transports you to “nature’s concert hall,” a pristine, acoustically perfect wilderness grotto; not appropriate for children under 12. Music by Messiaen, Castañeda, Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. Performers: Edmar Castañeda, harp; Eric Ruske, horn; Jennifer Frautschi and Harumi Rhodes, violin; LP How and Leslie Tomkins, viola; Tanya Tomkins, cello; and Pedja Muzijevic, piano. ($325, of which $190 is tax deductible)
  • Aug. 29, 7 p.m., Star Hall (159 E. Center St.), “Festival Opening Night: Music, Marriage and Madness.” Music by Robert Schumann, Clara Schumann, and Johannes Brahms. Performers: Eric Ruske, horn; Jennifer Frautschi and Harumi Rhodes, violin; LP How and Leslie Tomkins, viola; Tanya Tomkins and Jeremy Turner, cello; and Michel Barrett, Pedja Muzijevic and Eric Zivian, piano. ($25)
  • Aug. 30, 9 a.m., “Music Hike I.” A concert for the outdoor enthusiast; you will be transported to a secret wilderness location, from there a rigorous hike leads you to a natural setting for acoustic music; the hike requires a moderate level of stamina, agility and comfort, with uneven footing, slick rock, and some exposure to sun; outdoor clothing for a desert environment is recommended, hiking or trail shoes are required; not suitable for children under 12. Performers: Eric Ruske, horn, LP How and Harumi Rhodes, violin; Leslie Tomkins, viola; and Jeremy Turner cello. ($60)
  • Aug. 30, 6 p.m., Festival Tent, Red Cliffs Lodge (Mile Post 14 on Highway 128), “Edmar Castañeda Quartet.” Edmar Castañeda, harp; Andrea Tierra, vocals; Shiomi Cohen saxophone; and Dave Silliman, percussion. ($30)
  • Aug. 31, 9 a.m., “Music Hike II.” A concert for the outdoor enthusiast; you will be transported to a secret wilderness location, from there a rigorous hike leads you to a natural setting for acoustic music; the hike requires a moderate level of stamina, agility and comfort, with uneven footing, slick rock, and some exposure to sun; outdoor clothing for a desert environment is recommended, hiking or trail shoes are required; not suitable for children under 12. Performers: LP How, Harumi Rhodes and Jennifer Frautschi, violin. ($60)
  • Aug. 31, 6 p.m., Festival Tent, Red Cliffs Lodge, “Ireland in the New World.” Music by Percy Grainger, John Scott Skinner, Natalie Haas and traditional selections from Scotland and Ireland. Performers: Christopher Layer, pipes and flutes; Maeve Gilchrist, lever harp; Paul Woodiel, fiddle; Natalie Haas, cello. ($30)
  • Sept. 1, 2 p.m., Swanny Park (400 N. 100 West), “Rocky Mountain Power Family Picnic Concert.” The festival honors the milestone of Canyonlands National Park’s 50th anniversary with a brand new work, Grandstaff, written by Utah composer Gerald Elias; the program also includes Celtic tunes and the music of harpist Edmar Castañeda and vocalist Andrea Tierra. (Free)
  • Sept. 2, 6 p.m., Ranch Benefit Concert (held at a private ranch), “El Camino: The Road to Spanish Celtica.” Performers: Christopher Layer, pipes and flutes; Maeve Gilchrist, lever harp; Paul Woodiel, fiddle; and Natalie Haas, cello. ($100)
  • Sept. 3, 5:30 p.m., House Benefit Concert (held at a private home). Music by Debussy, Mozart and Fauré. Performers: LP How and Arnaud Sussmann, violin; Max Mandel and Leslie Tomkins, viola; Tanya Tomkins and Jeremy Turner, cello; and Pedja Muzijevic and Eric Zivian, piano. ($250)
  • Sept. 4, 12 p.m., “Grotto Concert II.” A 45 minute jet boat ride down the Colorado River that transports you to “nature’s concert hall,” a pristine, acoustically perfect wilderness grotto; not appropriate for children under 12. Music by Beethoven, Boccherini and Brahms. Performers: Marc Teicholz, guitar; Ayano Ninomiya and Arnaud Sussmann, violin; Max Mandel and Leslie Tomkins, viola; Tanya Tomkins and Jeremy Turner, cello; and Pedja Muzijevic and Eric Zivian, piano. ($325, of which $190 is tax deductible)
  • Sept. 5, 6 p.m., Sorrel River Ranch (Mile Post 17 on Highway 128). “Freedom and Censorship: The Music of Russia and Poland.” Music by Shostakovich, Chopin, Weinberg, Bacevicz and Rimsky-Korsakov Performers: LP How and Arnaud Sussmann, violin; Max Mandel and Leslie Tomkins, viola; Tanya Tomkins and Jeremy Turner, cello; and Pedja Muzijevic and Eric Zivian, piano. ($30)
  • Sept. 6, 11 a.m., Star Hall, “Open Rehearsal Conversation.” Get an insider’s view of how musicians create a staged production of Gilbert and Sullivan’s Trial by Jury, in partnership with the University of Utah Opera Department; Michael Barrett, conductor, Robert Breault, tenor; LP How and Arnaud Sussmann, violin; Jeremy Turner, cello; and Eric Zivian, piano. (Free)
  • Sept. 6, 6 p.m., Sorrel River Ranch, “John Pizzarelli Quartet.” John Pizzarelli, guitar and vocals; Konrad Paszkudzki, piano; Martin Pizzarelli, bass; and Kevin Kanner, drums. ($30)
  • Sept. 7, 9 a.m., “Music Hike III.” A concert for the outdoor enthusiast; you will be transported to a secret wilderness location, from there a rigorous hike leads you to a natural setting for acoustic music; the hike requires a moderate level of stamina, agility and comfort, with uneven footing, slick rock, and some exposure to sun; outdoor clothing for a desert environment is recommended, hiking or trail shoes are required; not suitable for children under 12. Performers: LP How, Mark Teicholz, guitar; Dana Lyn, fiddle; Christopher Layer, pipes and flutes; Jeremy Turner, cello. ($60)
  • Sept. 7, 7 p.m., Star Hall, “Festival Finale: There Will Always Be an England.” Music by Benjamin Britten, Alice Verne-Bredt, Arnold Bax and Gilbert and Sullivan. Performers: Robert Breault, tenor; Marc Teicholz, guitar; Ayano Ninomiya, Arnaud Sussmann and Paul Woodiel, violin; Tanya Tomkins and Jeremy Turner, cello; Jeffrey Price and Eric Zivian, piano; Michael Barrett, conductor; and Julie Wright-Costa, stage director. ($30)
  • Sept. 8, 12 p.m., “Grotto Concert III.” A 45 minute jet boat ride down the Colorado River that transports you to “nature’s concert hall,” a pristine, acoustically perfect wilderness grotto not appropriate for children under 12. Music by J.S. Bach. Performers: Marc Teicholz, guitar; Ayano Ninomiya and Arnaud Sussmann, violin; LP How and Leslie Tomkins, viola; Tanya Tomkins ad Jeremy Tucker, cello; and Michael Barrett and Eric Zivian, piano. ($325, of which $190 is tax deductible)
  • Sept. 8, 12 p.m., “Musical River Raft Trip.” A 4-day, 3-night custom raft trip that begins with a grotto concert; there will be daily concerts and rafting on the Colorado River with an exhilarating run of the Class III and IV rapids of world-famous Cataract Canyon; then take a jet boat for the final leg of the trip to Hite Marina at Lake Powell to catch a scenic flight over Canyonlands National Park and the Colorado River. ($2,100)
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PARK CITY FILM MUSIC FESTIVAL Film Scoring Seminar and “ALIVE INSIDE” Documentary Screening

WED AUG 27
PCFMF FILM SCORING SEMINAR:
By popular demand we have added one more film scoring seminar with composer Hummie Mann: Wednesday, Aug. 27, 7:00-8:30PM
The seminar is designed as an introduction to the process of scoring music for film, and serves as an excellent guide for filmmakers planning to work with composers and musicians, as well as for musicians and composers who want to learn more about creating film scores and working with filmmakers.

Park City Film Music Festival at the Prospector Lodge and Conference Center in Park City:
2175 Sidewinder Dr. , PC, UT 84060.
Admission is $20 per person and
is payable online
or at the door prior to
the seminar.
___________________________________________

SAT AUG 30
“ALIVE INSIDE” Documentary Film Showcase Screening
Don’t miss the SHOWCASE SCREENING this weekend of the documentary film “ALIVE INSIDE”.
The screening will be at 3PM, Saturday, August 30, at the Prospector Theater, 2175 Sidewinder Dr. in Park City.
Tickets are $5 at the door or online in advance at this link:

ALIVE INSIDE is a joyous cinematic exploration of music’s capacity to reawaken our souls and uncover the deepest parts of our humanity. Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett chronicles the astonishing experiences of individuals around the country who have been revitalized through the simple experience of listening to music. His camera reveals the uniquely human connection we find in music and how its healing power can triumph where prescription medication falls short.

This stirring documentary follows social worker Dan Cohen, founder of the nonprofit organization Music & Memory, as he fights against a broken healthcare system to demonstrate music’s ability to combat memory loss and restore a deep sense of self to those suffering from it. Rossato-Bennett visits family members who have witnessed the miraculous effects of personalized music on their loved ones, and offers illuminating interviews with experts including renowned neurologist and best-selling author Oliver Sacks (Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain) and musician Bobby McFerrin (“Don’t Worry, Be Happy”).

An uplifting cinematic exploration of music and the mind, ALIVE INSIDE’s inspirational and emotional story left audiences humming, clapping and cheering at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival, where it won the Audience Award.

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AUDITIONS ANNOUNCED FOR AMERICAN WEST CHORUS AND CHAMBER SINGERS

The American West Chorus and Chamber Singers are holding auditions for the 2014-15 season. We perform a variety of choral repertoire, either independently or with the American West Symphony. Rehearsals are held on Monday evenings in Sandy beginning Sept. 8. Our first concert of the season will feature favorites from Broadway musicals.

To schedule an audition or for more information, please contact Carolyn at 801-733-4220.

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MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL TO PREMIERE WORK BY GERALD ELIAS

Among his many interests, Gerald Elias has also become somewhat of a chronicler of Southeast Utah history.

In 2002, the violinist, composer and author wrote Conversations with Essie,which the Moab Music Festival premiered that year and revived in 2012. The piece is based on the oral history of Essie Larsen White, who in the early 20th century lived on a ranch near Moab where Red Cliffs Lodge now sits.

Gerald Elias

“At the time I wrote Essie I was thinking of all kinds of possibilities,” Elias said in an interview with Reichel Recommends. With his fertile mind, Elias was looking into subject matter for future works rooted in Utah’s red rock country.

One person who intrigued him was William Grandstaff (also spelled Granstaff), better known today as the namesake of Negro Bill Canyon. “William came to Moab and set up house in the fort that the Mormon settlers built and which they abandoned in the 1860s because of conflicts with the Indians,” Elias said. Grandstaff got along with the Indians and traded with them.

In the 1870s the settlers came back and were soon in conflict once again with the native population. But instead of acknowledging that the problems lay with them, the settlers blamed Grandstaff for getting the Indians riled up. “William feared for his life and left,” Elias said. “He went to what became known as Negro Bill Canyon, where he ranched.” It was the only spot in the area that had a permanently flowing stream. And it wasn’t too many years after Grandstaff had settled there that other settlers wanted that land. “He moved to Colorado where he became a saloon owner and was well respected in the community,” Elias said.

Elias’ Grandstaff, which the Moab Music Festival will premiere at its Sept. 1 concert commemorating Canyonlands National Park’s 50th anniversary, focuses on the moment where Grandstaff decides whether to stay and fight the settlers or leave. “Lurking behind the story is an element of racism,” Elias said. “But I didn’t make it contentious. I wanted to give people food for thought.”

In addition to writing the music, Elias also wrote the text. “I made it all up, except for one quote which I’m confident William said: ‘I have the feeling I am the Indian they are after.’”

Michael Barrett, co-director of the festival, suggested that the piece be scored for one voice and a few instruments. But Elias, who has a keen eye for the dramatic, decided to add two other characters beside Grandstaff. In addition to the title role, Elias also included a character named Frenchie, a scoundrel who lived in the area and knew Grandstaff, and Rebecca, the woman Grandstaff married after he moved to Colorado. “I decided to take some liberties and place her in Moab,” Elias said.

The 10-minute work is scored for flute, violin and piano and invokes the mood and spirit of the location and time. “I wanted the instruments to give a sense of place,” Elias said. “I wrote the flute part in Native American style rather than concert style, and there is a lot of fiddling for the violin. And the piano is a good instrument to help fill out textures and harmonies.”

The music for Grandstaff is very accessible, Elias explained. “It’s a tonal piece, generally. It has a somewhat contemporary sound but with a lot of folk elements.” As an example, Elias pointed to Frenchie’s music. Since he was a French-Canadian trapper Elias gave his music a Cajun lilt.

Singing the roles are baritone Jared Lesa (Grandstaff); tenor Lucas Goodrich (Frenchie); and soprano Jennifer Erickson (Rebecca). The ensemble consists of Christopher Layer, flute; Paul Woodiel, violin; and Mary Anne Hunstman, piano. Barrett will conduct.

“William led an interesting life,” Elias said. “It makes a compelling story. There is a lot of humor in it and it’s a great theater piece that anyone can enjoy.”

  • CONCERT DETAILS
  • What: Moab Music Festival
  • Venue: Swanny City Park, 400 N. 100 West, Moab
  • Time and Date: 2 p.m. Sept. 1
  • Tickets: Free
  • Phone: 435-259-7003
  • Web:www.moabmusicfest.org

(For a schedule of festival events please click here.) 

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PIANIST KARÉN HAKOBYAN IN RECITAL WEDNESDAY

Karén Hakobyan (Photo Credit: Brittany Gray Photography)

Karén Hakobyan, a University of Utah alumnus who now makes his home in New York City, will return to Salt Lake City Wednesday to give a recital. Part of the U.’s Piano Centennial Celebration Series, the program will include music by Beethoven, Ravel, Gershwin, Rachmaninoff, Horowitz, Scriabin and Armenian composer Arno Babadjanian. Hakobyan will also play some of his own works.

The recital takes place in Libby Gardner Concert Hall on the U. campus. Tickets are $10 for general admission and $6 for students and are available at the door. There will be free admission for those with a University of Utah ID.

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EARLY MUSIC SERIES heART MUSIC DEBUTS SUNDAY

Summer classical music offerings have been steadily increasing in and around Salt Lake City giving audiences a wide variety of choices. Now there is a new series set to make its debut this Sunday.

heArt Music cofounders Lisa Chaufty and Haruhito Miyagi (Photo: Reichel Recommends)

heArt Music, the brainchild of Haruhito Miyagi and Lisa Chaufty, is an early music series that will explore a broad range of repertoire, from Gregorian Chant to the late baroque. “We’re trying to expose people to this music,” Miyagi said.

Although early music has had a presence in the Salt Lake Valley since the 1980s, there haven’t been many ensembles devoted to playing music written within the timeframe represented by the term “early music.” There are a couple of notable ones, though. The University of Utah has had an early music group for several years, and Utopia Early Music has established itself firmly in the local classical music scene. “Utopia has done a great job bringing people in to their concerts,” said Chaufty, who will assume directorship of the U.’s early music ensemble this fall. And because of Utopia’s presence, Chaufty and Miyagi decided to present their series during the summer so as not to conflict with Utopia’s concert schedule, which runs from October to May.

Chaufty admitted that the Salt Lake City area has a lot of music events, but she insisted there is always room for more, especially for young performers and early music. “There are not enough performing opportunities for students, especially for this music,” Chaufty said, adding that she and Miyagi envision heArt Music as a venue for a rotating group of players. Chaufty, who plays recorder and baroque flute, and Miyagi, whose instruments are the organ and harpsichord, will make up the core of the group. And for each concert, they will invite other musicians to join them.

For their first concert on Sunday, they’ve invited Nicolas Chuaqui, tenor, and Cheryl Hart, soprano; David Fox, organ; Eleanor Christman Cox, baroque cello; and Leslie J. Richards, viola da gamba. Chuaqui is Chaufty’s son; he is also a member of the Cathedral of the Madeleine choir. Richards is a member of the Utah Symphony’s viola section. “She is a wonderful player on the viola da gamba,” Chaufty said.

The program, titled Flores del Verano: Concierto de Música Antigua (Flowers of Summer: A Concert of Early Music), will include music by Ockeghem, Telemann, Handel and Rameau, as well as Gregorian Chant.

The concert will take place in Sacred Heart Catholic Church in downtown Salt Lake City, where Miyagi is the music director. The name of the church is also the reason why the series is called heArt Music. “The church has lots of hearts, of course,” Miyagi said, “everywhere from the door to the stained glass windows.” Chaufty said she likes hearts. “And music has to come from the heart,” she added.

Since the church’s congregation is mostly Hispanic, the concerts will have a bilingual approach. “Our program notes will be in both Spanish and English,” Chaufty said, adding that the series will address itself in part to a segment of the community that has been underserved in the classical music scene here. “There is a need for music in the Latino community,” Miyagi said. “We want to have audiences made up of diverse backgrounds.”

There will only be one concert this season, but both Miyagi and Chaufty said their goal is to have a multi-concert season. “We’re planning on having four to five concerts per season, starting next summer,” Chaufty said. All concerts will be free of charge.

  • CONCERT DETAILS
  • What: heArt Music
  • Venue: Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 946 S. 200 East
  • Time and Date: 3 p.m. Aug. 17
  • Tickets: Free
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FROM PONCHIELLI TO SHOSTAKOVICH, SUNDAY’S BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL CONCERT RUNS GAMUT OF EMOTIONS

BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL PARK CITY, Temple Har Shalom, Aug. 10

Louis Spohr is an under appreciated composer today. A younger contemporary of Beethoven who outlived the older composer by some 30 years, Spohr contributed significantly to the development of German romanticism. Among his many works is a considerable body of art songs that are worthy to be placed among the contributions to the form by Schubert and Schumann.

Kirsten Gunlogson

Sunday’s Beethoven Festival Park City concert included Spohr’s Sechs deutsche Lieder, op. 103, for mezzo-soprano, clarinet and piano, performed by mezzo Kirsten Gunlogson, clarinetist Lee Livengood and pianist Melissa Livengood.

This set of six art songs is wonderfully expressive and idiomatically romantic. Gunlogson’s rich and vibrant voice is perfectly suited for this music. She captured the mood and character of each with her lyrically infused and lushly expressive singing that brought depth and dimension to the poetry.

This effusive interpretation was underscored by Lee Livengood’s seamlessly crafted and lyrical playing and Melissa Livengood’s sensitive piano playing.

Gunlogson also sang Ernest Chausson’s dark Chanson perpétuelle, op. 37. She crafted an evocative, expressive interpretation that brought out the emotional power of the poem. The eloquence Gunlogson brought to the work was complemented by the sensitive playing of Melissa Livengood and the string quartet consisting of violinists Blanka Bednarz, violist Leslie Harlow and cellist Cheung Chau.

After intermission, Bednarz, Chau and Melissa Livengood gave a powerful reading of Dmitri Shostakovich’s Piano Trio No. 2 in E minor.

Like so much of his music, the E minor Trio is angst ridden. Written towards the end of World War II, it’s overwhelmingly dark; there is also a pervading sense of imminent doom. The three musicians captured this emotional heaviness brilliantly with their acutely sensitive and nuanced playing. Their account was compelling and moving, thanks to their wonderfully articulated and executed interpretation.

The concert opened on the other end of the emotional spectrum with Amilcare Ponchielli’s operatic Il Convegno, a captivating divertimento for two clarinets played with exuberance by Russell Harlow and Lee Livengood. They captured the melodicism of the piece with their lighthearted and amiable reading.

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THIERRY FISCHER IN DEER VALLEY DEBUT

DEER VALLEY MUSIC FESTIVAL, Utah Symphony Chamber Orchestra, St. Mary’s Church, Aug. 6; festival runs through Aug. 9, tickets at 801-533-6683 or www.usuo.org 

Utah Symphony music director Thierry Fischer made his Deer Valley Music Festival debut Wednesday in a program of Mozart and early Beethoven, composers whose music certainly is suited to the intimate confines of St. Mary’s Church. A comparable program a week ago with guest conductor Matthew Halls worked wonderfully, and one could have expected the same result Wednesday. However, Fischer seemed to have forgotten where he was. His interpretation of the three works (Mozart’s overture to Lucio Silla and the Linz Symphony and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 2) was explosive and overstated. He went for a big sound, and he certainly got it. It would have been fine in the large and acoustically suited Abravanel Hall, but in the church’s small space it was too much.

And Fischer’s penchant for fast tempos didn’t help either. Too frequently the music came across as muddled and undefined — very uncharacteristic for Fischer, who has developed the orchestra into a commendable ensemble for 18th century music.

There were a large number of subs playing Wednesday, and they did do a credible job with the three works, although their playing lacked the orchestra’s usual finesse and clean articulation.

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