SALT LAKE SYMPHONY TO HOLD AUDITIONS FOR 2014-15 SEASON

The Salt Lake Symphony invites string players of all sections – violin, viola, cello and bass – to audition for its 2014-15 season. Auditions will be held on Aug. 19, 2014, beginning at 7 pm in Libby Gardner Concert Hall on the University of Utah campus.

Please contact Joyce at 801-250-9419 to schedule an audition.

For more information on the Salt Lake Symphony and its upcoming season log on to http://www.saltlakesymphony.org.

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WELL-TRAVELED BAGGAGE: A SEASONED VIOLINIST GETS SENTIMENTAL ABOUT HIS BSO EXPERIENCE

Gerald Elias

I don’t generally get maudlin over luggage. But after the final bows of Boston Symphony Orchestra’s Asia tour in May, I locked my wardrobe trunk and gave it an affectionate pat. This tour may well have been the brass-clad behemoth’s swansong.

Built like fortresses, BSO’s 25 trunks could last forever. Lined up backstage like dominoes, each one accommodates four musicians with two drawers and a clothes-hanging nook. Since many concert halls lack sufficient changing facilities for a hundred musicians, the trunks become makeshift dressing rooms.

Officially, only concert-related clothing and accessories are allowed in trunks. Unofficially, people have stuffed them with souvenirs, food, and drink. One BSO musician achieved fame (or infamy) by packing peanut butter and tuna to save meal money on tours. Skippy in Paris! Long ago, my No. 11 compartment was the domain of former colleague Gerald Gelbloom, who once forgot he’d packed a Carnegie Deli doggie bag of smoked fish until discovering it months later while readying for the next tour. Fortunately, the passage of 35 years has erased all offending olfactory traces.

If trunks could talk, what stories they’d tell! They crossed the Atlantic on the Île de France in 1952 for the BSO’s first European tour. And again in ’56 when Charles Munch and Pierre Monteux conducted 29 concerts in 35 days. In 1960, they departed for a mind-numbing 36 concerts in 26 cities from Japan to New Zealand. In 1979, there was a history-making, one-week sprint to China, when Beijing and Shanghai were clogged with bicycles, not smog and BMWs. Unlike any BSO member ever, only the wardrobe trunks have seen it all.

And what changes! In 1979, the nondescript, blue Mao uniform was China’s sole fashion. Now, Gucci and Deng Xiao Ping stand shoulder to shoulder in China’s pantheon of heroes. Shanghai is a futuristic cityscape of cloud-piercing skyscrapers, and within spitting distance from our Guangzhou hotel no fewer than eight, massive, semi-built monoliths were sprouting simultaneously. In comparison, Tokyo, a megalopolis of over 20 million, felt like a gracious, welcoming sea of tranquility where one could even find a subway seat, occasionally.

The seven-concert tour was a resounding success, whether Tchaikovsky, Berlioz, or Mahler were on the program. Chinese audiences were loud and rambunctious, and conductor Charles Dutoit needed to lead the musicians off the stage to terminate the adulation. Japanese audiences demonstrated appreciation more by longevity than volume, continuing to applaud until Maestro Dutoit returned to the stage to wave good-bye—after having changed into his street clothes.

Yet, the successes were bookended by barely averted disasters. Only three weeks before departure, venerable Maestro Lorin Maazel bowed out with health concerns. Someone of equal stature had to be found within days or the tour would be canceled. Any replacement had to satisfy not only the orchestra’s demanding artistic concerns but also tour sponsors and concert presenters. Miraculously, managing director Mark Volpe and artistic administrator Anthony Fogg pulled a rabbit out of the hat in the person of Dutoit, who heroically leaped into the breach without a single alteration of three heavyweight programs. So tight was his schedule, Dutoit arrived in Boston from Cologne the morning of our first rehearsal, and after the final concert at Suntory Hall in Tokyo he literally left the building for Narita Airport before the applause had died.

The other near miss occurred when Japanese customs officials refused entry of our instruments (packed in official cargo trunks) from China. The reason? Elephants. Until the ban on ivory, that’s what the tips of good string-instrument bows were made of. Now, importing or exporting any ivory whatsoever necessitates navigating a Byzantine regulatory labyrinth, which, as it was discovered, varies from country to country. Desperate communications flew between the BSO, the U.S. Embassy headed by Ambassador Caroline Kennedy, and the Japanese government. Ultimately, reasonable heads prevailed, resolving the snafu a few hours before the curtain went up.

But the curtain is coming down on our cumbersome wardrobe trunks, elephants of a different kind that weigh about 200 pounds empty. Worse, they lack wheels, making hauling them from concert hall to concert hall a backbreaker. Trunks are individually lifted onto dollies and truck-loaded. The process is reversed upon arrival at the next hall. For air transport, they’re grouped on pallets, wrapped in plastic, strung up like a Brobdingnagian pork roast, and then hoisted onto the plane. If stage manager John Demick’s budgetary wishes come true, the new 21st-century replacements will be smaller, lighter, and rollable. Eminently sensible. Still, as doors to the future open in Asia, when the lock on old No. 11 snapped shut, I sensed I was closing a colorful chapter of Boston Symphony’s illustrious past.

(Republished with the consent of Berkshire Magazine.)

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YOUNG VIOLINIST IMPRESSIVE AT DEER VALLEY CONCERT

DEER VALLEY MUSIC FESTIVAL, Utah Symphony Chamber Orchestra, St. Mary’s Church, Park City, July 16

The Utah Symphony has featured a number of exceptional young soloists at its Deer Valley Music Festival chamber concerts, but seldom has there been one as remarkable as Wednesday’s teen violinist.

Emma Meinrenken

Fourteen-year-old Emma Meinrenken, the junior winner of last year’s Stradivarius International Violin Competition, dazzled the audience in St. Mayr’s Church in two works: Schubert’s Rondo in A major for Violin and Strings and Saint-Saëns’ Havanaise.

The youngster is already a well rounded, one might say seasoned, musician. Her artistry and stage presence show a level of maturity well beyond her years. And the two pieces were well chosen. The Schubert allowed the Canadian-born Meinrenken to put her wonderfully crafted lyricism on display, while the Saint-Saëns gave her ample opportunity to show off her technical chops. Both were played with a self assurance and conviction that was quite impressive.

And the orchestra, under associate conductor Vladimir Kulenovic, offered well balanced accompaniment that let Meinrenken’s playing shine.

The concert opened with a robust treatment of Beethoven’s Egmont Overture. Kulenovic brought passion to his interpretation and the orchestra played with crisp articulation and finely honed delivery.

Rounding out the program was a sensitive reading of Ravel’s Pavane pour une infante défunte and a vibrant account of Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 4, Italian.

Under Kulenovic’s guidance the Mendelssohn sparkled with exuberance. The tempos were well chosen allowing the lightness and dexterity of the music to come through. The execution was spot on and the playing was effervescent and full of youthful playfulness.

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THREE RARELY PLAYED WORKS FEATURED AT SUNDAY’S BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL CONCERT

BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL PARK CITY, Temple Har Shalom, July 13; the festival runs through Aug. 11, tickets at the door or at www.beethovenfestivalparkcity.org 

The Beethoven Festival Park City closed out its first week with a superb concert of three rarely played works.

Opening the matinee concert Sunday was Beethoven’s Sonata for Violin and Piano in G major, op. 96, played by Brigham Young University violinist Monte Belknap and pianist John Jensen.

While the 10 violin sonatas Beethoven wrote are staples in every violinist’s repertoire, the Tenth in G major isn’t heard very often. Perhaps it’s because this work is so unlike much of Beethoven’s music. It doesn’t have the dramatic power or compelling passion that one associates with Beethoven. Instead, it’s a quiet, reflective piece that has a distinct pastoral character.

Belknap and Jensen gave a wonderfully nuanced and beautifully phrased account of the sonata. They captured the intimacy of the music with their subtle and sensitive playing.Their choice of tempos was spot on and allowed them to bring finely honed expressiveness to their reading.

Paired with the Beethoven in the first half was Borodin’s magnificent Sonata in B minor for Cello and Piano, played by Jensen and Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra cellist Armen Ksajikian.

Best known for his operas, Borodin wrote a few chamber works, the most famous of which are his two string quartets. But the cello sonata is perhaps an even better work than the quartets. It’s a challenging work for both players, especially for the cellist, and the two acquitted themselves wonderfully. From the boldness of the opening to the many softer lyrical passages throughout, Jensen and Ksajikian showed a mastery of the work that allowed them to give a compelling and utterly fascinating reading.

Rounding out the concert was David Carlson’s Quantum Quartet, for clarinet, viola, cello and piano, played by festival co-directors Russell Harlow, clarinet, and Leslie Harlow, viola, together with Ksajikian and Jensen.

Quantum Quartet was a festival commission and was premiered in 1998. For the festival’s 30th anniversary, the Harlows thought it would be fitting to bring it back into their repertoire. It was a fortunate decision, because it’s a well crafted work that places great demands on the four musicians. The quartet of players made short work of the piece, giving a tour de force performance that was quite powerful. They brought out the many changing moods and captured the evocative character of the music. It’s a work that these four ought to record and release on CD.

As a special treat, Ksajikian played an encore — a beautifully expressive reading of the prelude from J.S. Bach’s Suite No. 2 in D minor.

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SUPERB PRODUCTION OF ‘VANESSA’ OPENS LOGAN’S UTAH FESTIVAL

UTAH FESTIVAL, Vanessa, Ellen Eccles Theatre, Logan, July 9; festival runs through Aug. 9, tickets at 800-262-0074, ext. 3, or online at www.utahfestival.org  

Michael Ballam’s Utah Festival occasionally presents works not normally seen in Utah. In the past the festival has staged Giacomo Puccini’s Manon Lescaut and Modest Mussorgsky’s Boris Godunov, both of which Utah Opera has yet to mount.

This year, it’s Samuel Barber’s 1958 Pulitzer Prize winning opera Vanessa, another first for the festival.

From left: Beverly O'Regan Thiele (Vanessa), Amanda Tarver (Baroness), Andrew Bidlack (Anatol), Alice-Anne M. Light (Erika). Photo Credit: Waldron Creative.

The opera, with an original libretto by Barber’s partner Gian Carlo Menotti, offers a painful glimpse into the lives of Vanessa and her niece Erika as they are wooed and used by Anatol, the son of Vanessa’s old lover. Barber captures the atmosphere wonderfully with his music. While it’s overwhelmingly romantic, it’s tinged with biting dissonances that underscore the growing tension between the two women, between Erika and Anatol and between the women and the old Baroness, Vanessa’s mother. There is a brooding darkness that flows through the story that is at times quite unnerving. It’s a remarkable and bold work that has unfortunately never found a permanent place in the repertoire of American opera houses.

The cast assembled for this production is stellar. Leading off is soprano Beverly O’Regan Thiele in the title role. Her portrayal is emotionally charged and finely nuanced. Vanessa is a tragic figure as she denies reality and fights so desperately to stay in the past. Thiele captured that brilliantly.

Thiele was also brilliant vocally, hitting the high notes of her demanding role with ease while still infusing her singing with a keen expressiveness. It was quite an impassioned  and virtuosic presentation.

No less stunning was the mezzo-soprano Alice-Anne M. Light as Erika. She, too, captured the complexity of her role with her fabulous acting that brought conviction to her portrayal. And her singing was equally notable. Her role is no less challenging that that of Vanessa’s and Light made short work of the vocal demands. Her singing was crystal pure and gorgeously lyrical.

Alice-Anne M. Light (Erika) and Andrew Bidlack (Anatol). Photo Credit: Waldron Creative.

Tenor Andrew Bidlack as Anatol held his own remarkably well. With two such powerful females voices it would be easy to get lost, but Bidlack commanded the stage when he was present and blended wonderfully in ensembles with Thiele and Light. He possesses a forceful high tenor that is perfect for this role, since Anatol is required to sing in the high register frequently.

In the role of the Doctor was the bass Richard Zuch, who sang with finely crafted expressiveness. His voice is resonant and beautifully rounded and was a wonderful contrast to the three high voices. And he showed himself an exceptional actor as well, bringing much need comic relief in his well played drunk scene in the second act.

As the stern Baroness who disapproves of Vanessa’s and Erika’s decisions is the mezzo-soprano Amanda Tarver. She gave a strong performance that captured perfectly the unforgiving, almost hard hearted nature of her character.

Baritone Kevin Nakatani and tenor Jon Jurgens sing the small roles of the butler and the pastor, respectively.

The stage direction, by Daniel Helfgot, was spot on; the action moved forward at a good pace. The orchestra played the difficult score marvelously under conductor Barbara Day Turner. Her tempos were well chosen and she never allowed the singers to be overpowered by the orchestra, even in the loudest passages.

This is a production that is well worth the drive to Logan to see. No one will be disappointed.

Vanessa will also be performed on July 18 and 24 at 7:30 p.m. and on Aug. 2 at 1 p.m. The opera is in repertory with Oklahoma!, The Student Prince and Les Misérables.

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LOGAN’S UTAH FESTIVAL BEGINS JULY 9

Utah Festival, formerly the Utah Festival Opera and Musical Theatre, kicks off its new season next week with a production of Samuel Barber’s rarely performed Vanessa.

Samuel Barber and Gian Carlo Menotti (librettist for "Vanessa")

The festival runs through Aug. 9. Besides Vanessa, this season also includes Sigmund Romberg’s The Student Prince, Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Oklahoma! and Schönberg and Boublil’s Les Misérables.

All shows take place in the Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan. Tickets are $45-$262 for all four mainstage productions, or $42-$247 for all four mainstage productions during opening week. Single tickets range from $13-$77. Tickets can be purchased by calling 800-262-0074, ext. 3, or by logging on to www.utahfestival.org.

Below is a rundown of performances that take place in the Ellen Eccles Theatre. Other programs take place in various downtown venues. For a complete listing of events, log on to www.utahfestival.org.

  • Vanessa, by Samuel Barber, original libretto by Gian-Carlo Menotti; Barbara Day Turner, conductor; Daniel Helfgot, director; Beverly O’Regan Thiele (Vanessa), Alice-Anne Light (Erika), Andrew Bidlack (Anatol), Amanda Tarver (The Old Baroness). July 9, 7:30 p.m., July 18, 7:30 p.m., July 24, 7:30 p.m., August 2, 1 p.m.
  • Oklahoma!, by Rodgers and Hammerstein; Karen Keltner, conductor; Maggie L. Harrer; director, Leah Edwards (Laurey), Wes Mason (Curly), Kevin Nakatani (Jud). July 10, 7:30 p.m., July 17, 7:30 p.m., July 19, 7:30 p.m., July 24, 1 p.m., July 26, 1 p.m., August 1, 1 p.m., August 7-8, 7:30 p.m.
  • The Student Prince, by Sigmund Romberg; Barbara Day Turner, conductor; Jack Shouse, director; Andrew Bidlack (Prince Karl Franz), Richard Zuch (Doctor Engel), Emma-Grace Dunbar (Kathie), Vanessa Ballam (Princess Margaret). July 11, 7:30 p.m., July 17, 1 p.m., July 25, 1 p.m., August 1, 7:30 p.m., August 9, 1 p.m. 
  • “8 Hands 2 Pianos,” Utah Festival pianists will present an unpredictable concert of classical hits where they’ll be dressing up, playing jokes on each other — and who knows what other mayhem will ensue. July 12, 1 p.m. ($11-$41, $10-$35 with opera series purchase)
  • Les Misérables, lyrics by Alain Boublil and Jean-Marc Natel, music by Claude-Michel Schönberg; Karen Keltner, conductor; Valerie Rachelle, director; Patrick Miller (Jean Valjean), Vanessa Ballam (Fantine), Daniel Cilli (Inspector Javert) Leah Edwards (Cosette). July 12, 7:30 p.m., July 16, 7:30 p.m., July 18-19, 1 p.m., July 23, 7:30 p.m., July 25-26, 7:30 p.m., July 30, 7:30 p.m., July 31, 1 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., August 2, 7:30 p.m., August 7-8, 1 p.m., Aug. 9, 7:30 p.m.
  • International Opera Competition Semifinals, Utah Festival hosts more than 20 talented artists, and the audience helps select a winner who then heads to Italy to compete. July 15, 1 p.m., ($10)
  • “Pioneers and Patriots, A Tribute to John Philip Sousa,” presented in collaboration with the Utah State University Music Department; James Michael Bankhead, conductor. Thrill to the sound of a 42-piece band with choir, soloists and surprises, in a program drawn largely from the concert Sousa himself led in Logan in 1927. July 22, 7:30 p.m. ($11-$41, $10-$35 with opera series purchase)
  • Operafest/International Opera Competition Finals, Karen Keltner and Barbara Day Turner, conductors. After the finalists have performed with orchestra, and while the judges confer and the audience vote is tallied, you will be entertained by Utah Festival stars. July 29, 7:30 p.m. ($11-$41, $10-$35 with opera series purchase)
  • “Best of Beethoven,” American Festival Chorus, Utah Festival Orchestra and Soloists, Craig Jessop conductor. From the intimate to the grand, this is a celebration of Beethoven ending in the triumphant Ode to Joy from his monumental Ninth Symphony, August 6, 7:30 p.m. ($11-$41, $10-$35 with opera series purchase)
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BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL PARK CITY CONCERT SCHEDULE


Here is the complete schedule for the Beethoven Festival Park City’s 30th anniversary concert season.

Tickets are $20 for general admission and $15 for seniors (62+) and students. Ten-concert punch passes are also available for $150 for general admission and $100 for seniors and students. Six-concert punch passes cost $90 for general admission and $66 for seniors and students. For Summit County residents a 6-punch pass is only $66. All tickets can be purchased at the door or in advance by logging on to www.pcmusicfestival.com. If you bring a Beethoven item to a concert you will receive a $5 discount off the regular ticket price.

  • July 7, 6:30 p.m., City Park Bandstand (1354 Park Ave.) –  “Monday Chamber Music Concert in the Park,” in collaboration with Mountain Town Music. Program includes audience favorites as well as a few surprises. Performers: John Jensen, piano; Armen Ksajikian, cello; Monte Belknap, violin; Leslie Harlow, viola; Russell Harlow, clarinet. (Free.)
  • July 10, 8 p.m., Park City Community Church (U-224 at Bear Hollow Dr.) –  “Chamber Music Showcase.” Program: a Handel Oboe Concerto; Ramiro Cortes’ Trio for Clarinet, Cello and Piano; Brahms’ Piano Quartet in C minor. Performers: Monte Belknap and Alexander Woods, violin; Russell Harlow, clarinet; Leslie Harlow, viola; Armen Ksajikian, cello; John Jensen, piano.
  • July 11, 6:30 p.m., at the Home of Jan Zinn – “Salon Concert.” Attendees dine and relax while enjoying virtuoso performances featuring festival artists. ($45 minimum donation per person, space is limited, please make your reservation online Click Here or by  chmusic@pcmusicfestival.com with your reservation, please include date(s)
 of the Salon concert you would like to attend, 
your name, the number of guests in your party, 
your email address and phone number; or call 435-649-5309.)
  • July 13, 3 p.m., Temple Har Shalom (U-224 at Brookside Ct.) – “Sunday Afternoon Chamber Music.” Program: Beethoven’s Piano and Violin Sonata, op. 96; Borodin’s Cello and Piano Sonata; David Carlson’s Quantum Quartet for Clarinet, Viola, Cello and Piano. Performers: Monte Belknap, violin; Russell Harlow, clarinet; Leslie Harlow, viola; Armen Ksajikian, cello; John Jensen, piano.
  • July 14, 6:30 p.m., City Park Bandstand – “Monday Chamber Music Concert in the Park,” in collaboration with Mountain Town Music. Program includes audience favorites as well as a few surprises. Performers: John Jensen, piano; Armen Ksajikian, cello; Monte Belknap, violin; Leslie Harlow, viola; Russell Harlow, clarinet. (Free.)
  • July 17, 8 p.m., Park City Community Church – “Chamber Music Showcase.” Program: Turina’s La Oración del Torero, op. 34; Beethoven’s String Quartet in G major, op. 18, no. 2; Juan Bautista Plaza’s Fuga Criolla; Paquito D’Rivera’s Wapango. Performers: Dalí String Quartet; Russell Harlow, clarinet; Leslie Harlow, viola.
  • July 19, 6:30 p.m., Jane’s Home (1229 E. South Temple, Salt Lake City) – “Salon Concert.” Attendees dine and relax while enjoying virtuoso performances featuring the Dalí Quartet. ($50 minimum donation per person, space is limited to 24 guests, please make your reservation as soon as possible. To register and pay online, Click Here or email chmusic@pcmusicfestival.com with your reservation, please include date(s)
of the Salon concerts you would like to attend, your name, the number of guests in your party, your email address and phone number; or call 435-649-5309.)
  • July 20, 5 p.m., Temple Har Shalom – “30th Season Celebration.” Gala Concert and Buffet, featuring the Dalí Quartet; Russell Harlow, clarinet; Leslie Harlow, viola. Program includes Mozart’s String Quintet in G minor, K. 516; Efrain Amaya’s Angelica; Abelardito Valdez’s Danzón Almendra; Juan Bautista Plaza’s Fuga Criolla; Carlos Gardel’s El dia que me quelras; and Rafael Hernández’s El Cumbanchero. $75 per person – To make your reservations online and pay for your tickets: Click Here
  • July 21, 6:30 p.m., City Park Bandstand “Monday Chamber Music Concert in the Park,” in collaboration with Mountain Town Music. Performers: Dalí Quartet. (Free.)
  • July 24, 7:30 p.m., Park City Community Church – “Chamber Music Showcase.” Program: Virtuoso violin and piano works; a Beethoven string quartet; and Latin works for clarinet, violin and piano. Performers: Manuel Ramos and Monte Belknap, violin; Russell Harlow, clarinet; Leslie Harlow, viola.
  • July 26, Canceled (appears on some schedules, but has been canceled)
  • July 27, 3 p.m., Temple Har Shalom – “Sunday Afternoon Chamber Music.” Program: Manuel de Falla’s Harpsichord Concerto; Stravinsky’s Concertino; Debussy’s String Quartet. Performers: Manuel Ramos and Monte Belknap, violin; Pamela Jones, harpsichord; Robert Stephenson, oboe; Lisa Byrnes, flute; Russell Harlow, clarinet; Leslie Harlow, viola.
  • July 28, 6:30 p.m., City Park Bandstand “Monday Chamber Music Concert in the Park,” in collaboration with Mountain Town Music. Program includes audience favorites as well as a few surprises. (Free.)
  • July 31, 8 p.m., Park City Community Church – “Chamber Music Showcase.” Program: Virtuoso violin and piano works; Schubert’s Piano Trio in E flat; Copland’s Sonata for Clarinet and Piano. Performers: Paul Rosenthal, violin; Russell Harlow, clarinet; Leslie Harlow, viola; Jeffrey Solow, cello; Doris Stevenson, piano.
  • Aug. 2, 5:30 p.m. – “Salon Concert.” Attendees dine and relax while enjoying virtuoso performances featuring festival artists. (To make your reservation online and pay for your ticket, Click Here)$45 minimum donation per person, space is limited please make your reservations as soon as possible, email chmusic@pcmusicfestival.com with your reservation, please include date(s)
of the Salon concert you would like to attend, 
your name, the number of guests in your party, your email address and phone number; or call 435-649-5309.)
  • Aug. 3, 3 p.m., Temple Har Shalom “Sunday Afternoon Chamber Music.” Program: Franck’s Quintet for Piano and Strings; a Beethoven cello sonata; Weber’s Quintet for Clarinet and Strings. Performers: Paul Rosenthal and Monte Belknap, violin; Russell Harlow, clarinet; Leslie Harlow, viola; Jeffrey Solow, cello; Doris Stevenson, piano.
  • Aug. 4, 6:30 p.m., City Park Bandstand “Monday Chamber Music Concert in the Park,” in collaboration with Mountain Town Music. Program includes audience favorites as well as a few surprises. (Free.)
  • Aug. 7, 8 p.m., Park City Community Church “Chamber Music Showcase.” Program: Marcello’s Oboe Concerto, arranged for clarinet and strings; Kodaly’s Duo for Violin and Cello; a Mozart string quartet. Performers: Blanka Bednarz, violin; Cheung Chau, cello; Russell Harlow, clarinet; Leslie Harlow, viola.
  • Aug. 9,Canceled (appears on some schedules, but has been canceled)
  • Aug. 10, 3 p.m., Temple Har Shalom “Sunday Afternoon Chamber Music.” Program: Ponchielli’s Il Convegno, Divertimento for Two Clarinets and Piano; Louis Spohr’s Six German Lieder, for Soprano, Clarinet and Piano; Shostakovich’s Trio for Violin, Cello and Piano. Performers: Blanka Bednarz and Monte Belknap, violin; Kirsten Gunlogson, mezzo-soprano; Cheung Chau, cello; Russell Harlow and Lee Livengood, clarinet; Leslie Harlow, viola; Melissa Livengood, piano.
  • Aug. 11, 6:30 p.m., City Park Bandstand “Monday Chamber Music Concert in the Park,” in collaboration with Mountain Town Music. Program includes audience favorites as well as a few surprises. (Free.)

(Festival co-director Leslie Harlow spoke with Edward Reichel recently about the season. To read the interview click here.) 

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BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL PARK CITY, UTAH’S OLDEST, CELEBRATES 30 YEARS

Violist Leslie Harlow was just finishing up her studies at Juilliard when she was hired to sub for the Utah Symphony. After arriving here, she quickly fell in love with the Beehive State and decided to remain.

She also decided to start a summer chamber music festival in Park City. That was in 1983, and the following year her dream became a reality. Thirty years later the Beethoven Festival Park City is going stronger than ever. It’s the oldest summer festival in Utah and one of the oldest in the Intermountain West region.

The festival kicks off its 21-concert anniversary season on July 7 and runs through Aug. 11. In those five weeks there will be concerts in the Park City Community Church and at Temple Har Shalom. There will also be outdoor concerts in Park City’s City Park, presented in collaboration with Mountain Town Music.

Beethoven Festival co-directors Leslie and Russell Harlow.

While Harlow was eager to start a festival she had no idea how to go about it. As a student at Juilliard and living in New York City she knew a number of musicians, either by reputation or because she had performed with them, and that gave her a core group of players to invite to Park City for the festival’s inaugural season.

“I knew [cellist] Jeff Solow, because I played with him at the Skaneateles Festival,” Harlow said in a phone interview with Reichel Recommends. And it was through Solow she became acquainted with violinist Paul Rosenthal’s playing. “Jeff invited me over to dinner, and afterwards he played a recording of Paul playing a demanding piece he had written for violin. Jeff also told me about Paul’s Sitka Summer Festival in Alaska.”

Sitka was one of the major influences for Harlow’s festival, and it was Rosenthal who holds the distinction of being Harlow’s first invitee. “I called Paul to invite him to play at my new festival,” she said, expecting that it might be a difficult sell. But Rosenthal surprised her. “When I asked him to come and play he immediately said yes. Then he asked me, ‘When do you want me to come and what do you want me to play.’ After he said that, I thought, ‘Hey, this might not be hard after all.’”

Jeffrey Solow

In addition to Rosenthal, the first year roster included, among others, Solow, pianist Doris Stevenson and violist Paul Neubauer. Also appearing were two Utah Symphony members, concertmaster William Preucil and violinist Andrés Cárdenes, who succeeded Preucil as concertmaster.

Three of the charter members will be returning this summer: Rosenthal, Solow and Stevenson. They’ll be appearing during the festival’s fourth week, from July 28-Aug. 3.

Also coming to Park City this summer are cellist Armen Ksajikian, a member of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra; violinist Manuel Ramos, a former member of the St. Louis Symphony and now artist-in-residence for the State of Mexico at Belles Artes; pianist John Jensen; clarinetist Lee Livengood from the Utah Symphony; Brigham Young University violinists Alexander Woods and Monte Belknap; Utah Valley University cellist Cheung Chau; and violinist Blanka Bednarz. All of these players have performed at the festival in the past. Some, like Jensen and Ramos, have been long time members of the festival roster.

Several musicians will be making their festival debut this summer: Salt Lake City pianist and accompanist Melissa Livengood; University of Utah mezzo-soprano Kirsten Gunlogson; flutist Lisa Byrnes, and oboist Robert Stephenson from the Utah Symphony; and the Dalí String Quartet.

“We’re really thrilled that they could all be here this year,” Harlow said.

They’ll be playing a wide ranging repertoire that will include music by Beethoven, Mozart, Weber, de Falla, Stravinsky, as well as by Utah composer Ramiro Cortes and a David Carlson work commissioned by the festival a few years ago. (To view the complete festival schedule, click here.)

In addition to the concerts, there will also be number of the popular salon concerts that take place in private residences in Park City and Salt Lake City.

Today, Harlow co-directs the festival with her husband Russell Harlow, a clarinetist and former associate principal clarinet of the Utah Symphony. Russell Harlow already had considerable experience running a series before becoming the festival’s co-director, since it was he who founded the NOVA Chamber Music Series in 1977. He directed NOVA for about a decade before handing over the reins to fellow Utah Symphony member, violinist Barbara Scowcroft. Both Leslie and Russell Harlow will also once again be featured performers this year.

Thirty years is a long time, but Leslie Harlow takes it all in stride. “It’s just how we live,” she said. “Looking back, I’ve spent half my life doing it, and Russ has been at it longer, when you count his years running NOVA.

“We just love it and wouldn’t have it any other way.

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INTERMEZZO OPENS SEASON WITH EFFUSIVELY ROMANTIC PROGRAM

INTERMEZZO CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES, Vieve Gore Concert Hall, June 30

The Intermezzo Chamber Music Series opened its 13th season Monday with an effusively romantic program. Works by Josef Suk, Robert Schumann and Antonin Dvorák were played with passion, feeling and wonderfully crafted expressions by Utah Symphony members Lun Jiang, violin; David Porter, violin and viola; and Pegsoon Whang, cello. Joining them was guest pianist Hyunsoon Whang, substituting for the originally scheduled Heather Conner.

The concert opened with Suk’s Piano Trio in C minor. Suk’s music has been woefully neglected, although he is a first rate composer and craftsman, as this early work quitter clearly shows. It’s a delightfully lyrical work, yet also at times dramatic and quite striking. And Jiang, Pegsoon Whang and Hyunsoon Whang infused their playing with fluid expressiveness and passionate vigor that captured the romantic power of the work remarkably well.

The trio was paired with Schumann’s late Violin Sonata in A minor, op. 105, played by Porter and Hyunsoon Whang. Much darker than most of his late works, the sonata makes a powerful statement with its restless energy and driven romanticism.

The two gave a moving account of the sonata that underscored the earnestness of the music while incorporating finely crafted lyricism and expressiveness into their reading.

Rounding out the program was a forceful performance of Dvorák’s Piano Quartet in E flat major, op. 87.

With Porter on viola, the four players gave a vibrant reading that captured the emotional depth and power of the work. They delved into the score and created a nuanced, sensitive interpretation that was filled with finely honed expressions and subtle inflections. Everything was in balance, and nothing was overstated. This was a wonderful example of how Dvorák’s music ought to be played.

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PERFORMANCES-THEATRE-JULY 2014

WINDSTORM THEATER, Fiddler on the Roof, book by Joseph Stein, lyrics by Sheldon Harnick, music by Jerry Bock, directed by Robinne Booth, set in Czarist Russia in 1905 the story centers on Tevye, the father of five daughters and his attempts to maintain his family and religious traditions while outside influences encroach upon their lives, through July 12, 7:30 p.m., also 1:30 p.m. matinees on Saturdays, Murray High School Theater, 5440 S. State, $10.99, 801-770-4242, www.windstormtheater.com.

THE OFF BROADWAY THEATRE, Anni of Aquamarine Gables, by Jeff Driggs, when Sarsaparilla and Cashew Colbert take in an orphan to help them on their Utah farm they have no idea what they’re in for in this good natured spoof of L.M. Montgomery’s classic tale, through July 19, 7:30 p.m., 272 S. Main, $10-$16, 801-355-4628, www.theobt.org.

CENTERPOINT LEGACY THEATRE, Children of Eden, a musical by Stephen Schwartz, directed by Alane Schultz, the play is loosely based on the Book of Genesis and tells the story from the Creation until right after the Flood; the show examines the age-old conflict between parents and children, with Act I telling the story of Adam and Eve and Cain and Abel and Act II dealing with Noah and the Flood, through July 19, 7:30 p.m., also 2:30 p.m. matinees on July 12 and 19, Barlow Main Stage, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, $17-$22 general, 801-298-1302, www.centerpointtheatre.org. 

TERRACE PLAZA PLAYHOUSE, The Wizard of Oz, book adapted by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Jeremy Sams, original songs from the film by Harold Arlen and E.Y. Harburg, with additional music by Andrew Lloyd Webber and additional lyrics by Tim Rice, through July 26, 7:30 p.m., 99 E. 4700 South, Ogden, $7-$12, 801-393-0070, http://terraceplayhouse.com.

OLD LYRIC REPERTORY COMPANY, Musical of Musicals (The Musical), book by Eric Rockwell and Joanne Bogart, lyrics by Joanne Bogart, music by Eric Rockwell, this is a musical comedy about musicals, in which one story becomes five musicals each written in the distinctive style of a different master of the form, from Rodgers and Hammerstein to Stephen Sondheim, through July 29, 7:30 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees, Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 W. Center St., Logan, $17-$30, 435-797-8022, http://arts.usu.edu/lyric/.

OLD LYRIC REPERTORY COMPANY, Tons of Money, written by Will Evans and Valentine, revised by Alan Ayckbourn, this spirited farce follows a broke inventor who inherits tons of money only to discover that he won’t see a penny due to massive debt, but then he hatches a brilliant idea – fake his own death, resurface as cousin George, claim the fortune and skip out on his creditors, through July 31, 7:30 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees, Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 W. Center St., Logan, $12-$25, 435-797-8022, http://arts.usu.edu/lyric/.

OLD LYRIC REPERTORY COMPANY, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, book by Burt Shevelove and Larry Gelbart, lyrics and music by Stephen Sondheim, this fast paced, witty and irreverent comedy is one of the funniest musicals ever written, it takes comedy back to its roots and combines situations from time tested comedies of ancient Rome to the infectious energy of classic vaudeville, through August 2, 7:30 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees, Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 W. Center St., Logan, $17-$30, 435-797-8022, http://arts.usu.edu/lyric/.

HALE CENTRE THEATRE-WEST VALLEY CITY, Disney’s Mary Poppins, through August 9, 7:30 p.m., also 12:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. matinees, no performances on July 4 and 24, special 9 a.m. performances for ages 3 and older on July 19 and 26 and August 2, $32 general, $16 children ages 5-11 years, 801-984-9000, www.halecentretheatre.org.

HALE CENTRE THEATRE-OREM, Man of La Mancha, lyrics by Joe Darion, book by Dale Wasserman, music by Mitch Leigh, through August 9, 7:30 p.m., also 3 p.m. matinees on Saturdays, 225 W. 400 North, $16-$21 general, $12-$17 children, 801-226-8600, www.haletheater.org.

DESERT STAR PLAYHOUSE, Calamity Jane: Cowgirls Just Wanna Have More Fun, through August 24, 6 p.m., 7 p.m., 8:30 p.m., also 11:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. matinees, $18.95 adults, $10.95 children (11 years and under), 4861 S. State, 801-266-2600, www.desertstar.biz.

UTAH SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, Measure for Measure, by William Shakespeare, directed by Laura Gordon, in this seldom produced but daring dark comedy Shakespeare tests integrity and decency to their limits; but in the end Isabella remains virtuous and truth proves stronger than swords and evil men, through August 29, 8 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees, Adams Shakespearean Theatre, 351 W. Center St., Cedar City, $32-$73, 800-752-9849, www.bard.org.

UTAH SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, Sense and Sensibility, world premiere of a new stage adaptation of Jane Austen’s novel by Joseph Henreddy and J.R. Sullivan, directed by Joseph Henreddy, full of repressed passion and soaring emotions, this adaptation was commissioned especially for festival audiences; it tells the touching and comic story of the Dashwood sisters who are both looking for true love but in very different ways, through August 29, 8 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees, Randall L. Jones Theatre, 351 W. Center St., Cedar City, $32-$73, 800-752-9849, www.bard.org.

PICKLEVILLE PLAYHOUSE, Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, book by Linda Wolverton, lyrics by Howard Ashman and Tim Rice, music by Alan Menken, through August 30, 8 p.m., also 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. matinees, 2049 S. Bear Lake Blvd., Garden City, $19.50 adults, $14.50 children (show only), $13.95 adults, $9.95 children (dinner only), $33.45 adults, $24.45 children (dinner and show), 435-946-2918, www.picklevilleplayhouse.com.

UTAH SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, Henry IV Part One, by William Shakespeare, directed by Brian Vaughn, civil war still smolders around Henry IV’s new kingdom, however the heir to the throne, Prince Hal, ignores the gathering storm clouds and parties wildly with his debauched friends, including the hilarious rogue Sir John Falstaff, but ultimately the prince must choose between revelry and the bravery of a soldier and king, because his choice will shape the future of a nation, through August 30, 8 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees, Adams Shakespearean Theatre, 351 W. Center St., Cedar City, $32-$73, 800-752-9849, www.bard.org.

UTAH SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, The Comedy of Errors, by William Shakespeare, directed by Brad Carroll, Antipholus and Dromio are bewildered, every dusty road they turn down looks just like the last one, and every prospector and saloon girl seems to know more about them than they know about themselves; the more they try to unravel the lunatic events swirling around them the more farcical their lives become; it’s double the laughter with two sets of twins and twice the fun when Shakespeare’s hysterical comedy is reimagined in the California gold rush of 1849, through August 30, 8 p.m., Adams Shakespearean Theatre, 2 p.m. matinees, Auditorium Theatre, both 351 W. Center St., Cedar City, $32-$73 (evenings), $28-$64 (matinees), 800-752-9849, www.bard.org.

UTAH SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, Into the Woods, book by James Lapine, music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, directed by Jeremy Mann, an uncertain Cinderella, a bloodthirsty Little Red Riding Hood, a wicked witch who sings and dances – they’re all among the cockeyed characters of this fractured fairy tale, through August 30, 8 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees, Randall L. Jones Theatre, 351 W. Center St., Cedar City, $36-$77, 800-752-9849, www.bard.org.

SALT LAKE ACTING COMPANY, Saturday’s Voyeur 2014, by Allen Nevins and Nancy Borgenicht, directed by Cynthia Fleming, celebrating its 36th year Saturday’s Voyeur will once again be a voice for liberals in Utah; this funny, raucous, truly unique musical satire written for us and about us will give Utahns a place to laugh and love living in Utah, the language is often crude and the cast antics are bawdy at best, lewd when it gets better, through August 31, p.m., Wednesdays-Saturdays at 7:30 p.m., Sundays at 1 p.m. and 6 p.m., Upstairs Theatre, 168 W. 500 North, $39-$55 general, 801-363-7522, www.saltlakeactingcompany.org.

PICKLEVILLE PLAYHOUSE, Who Shot Juanito Bandito? Reimagined, musical comedy by T.J. Davis, the infamous El Bandito is only one heist away from completing his quest to rob every bank in the Western Territories and cement his reputation as the baddest bad guy in history, through September 6, 8 p.m., also 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. matinees, 2049 S. Bear Lake Blvd., Garden City, $19.50 adults, $14.50 children (show only), $13.95 adults, $9.95 children (dinner only), $33.45 adults, $24.45 children (dinner and show), 435-946-2918, www.picklevilleplayhouse.com.

UTAH SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, Twelfth Night, by William Shakespeare, directed by David Ivers, Orsino loves Olivia, who won’t give him the time of day; Olivia loves Viola, whom she thinks is a boy; Viola loves Orsino, who doesn’t know she’s a girl; Malvolio loves being in love and Andrew, Toby Belch and Maria love life to its fullest; it’s all rollicking confusion, but in the end this hilarious cast of characters does find love when they least expect it, through October 17, 8 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees (7:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. matinees in September and October) Randall L. Jones Theatre, 351 W. Center St., Cedar City, $32-$73, 800-752-9849, www.bard.org.

SCERA CENTER, Les Misérables, Utah Valley premiere, lyrics by Alain Boublil and Jean-Marc Natel, music by Claude-Michel Schönberg, English language libretto by Herbert Kretzmer, July 3-19, 8 p.m., no show on July 4, ASL interpreted on July 10, SCERA Shell Outdoor Theatre, 699 S. State, Orem, $12 general, $10 seniors/students/children (ages 3-11), $14-$16 reserved, $12-$14 reserved seniors/students/children, 801-225-2787, www.scera.org.

EGYPTIAN THEATRE, A Chorus Line, book by James Kirkwood and Nicholas Dante, lyrics by Edward Kleban, music by Marvin Hamlisch, the show is a celebration of chorus dancers, the unsung heroes of the American musical theatre, July 4-27, 8 p.m., with 6 p.m. only performances on July 6, 13, 20 and 27, 328 Main St., Park City, $35-$39 advance, $44 at the door, $43-$49 front of house advance, $48-$54 at the door, $55-$65 cabaret seats advance, $60-$70 at the door, 435-649-9371, www.egyptiantheatrecompany.org. 

OLD LYRIC REPERTORY COMPANY, The Elephant Man, by Bernard Pomerance, this 1979 Tony Award winning play chronicles the true story of John Merrick, treated first as a fairground freak because of his deformed body and later exploited more subtly by Victorian society, July 9-August 1, 7:30 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees, Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 W. Center St., Logan, $14-$25, 435-797-8022, http://arts.usu.edu/lyric/.

BROADWAY ACROSS AMERICA, Wicked, book by Winnie Holzman, music and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz, July 9-August 24, 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 8 p.m., also 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. matinees, Capitol Theatre, $55-$185, 800-259-5840, http://saltlakecity.broadway.com/.

HERRIMAN ARTS COUNCIL, Shrek the Musical, book and lyrics by David Lindsay-Abaire, music by Jeanine Tesori, July 10-12, 14-15, 17-19, 21, 7 p.m., Rosecrest Pavilion, Butterfield Park, 6212 Butterfield Park Way, Herriman, $10 general, $6 seniors and children 12 and under, www.herriman.org.

GRASSROOTS SHAKESPEARE COMPANY, Summer Tour Finale, Henry V, As You Like It and A Midsummer Night’s Dream (featuring the 2011 original all-male cast), by William Shakespeare, July 11-12, starting at 6 p.m., The Castle Amphitheater, 1300 E. Center St., Provo, $12 adults, $6 children, at the door, www.grassrootsshakespeare.com.

WINDSTORM THEATER, Pirates of Penzance, by Gilbert and Sullivan, July 14-26, 7:30 p.m., also 1:30 p.m. matinees on Saturdays, no performance on July 24, Murray High School Theater, 5440 S. State, $7.99-$9.99, 801-770-4242, www.windstormtheater.com.

BABCOCK THEATRE, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, by William Shakespeare, directed by Hugh Hanson, July 17-27, 7:30 p.m., also 2 p.m. matinees, $18 general, $15 U. faculty/staff/seniors/military and immediate family, $8.50 students, lower level of Simmons Pioneer Memorial Theatre, University of Utah, 801-581-7100, www.kingsburyhall.utah.edu.

THE ECHO THEATRE, Into the Woods, book by James Lapine, music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, Cinderella and Little Red Riding Hood aren’t how you remember them in Stephen Sondheim’s witty take on fairy tales, July 18-August 23, 7:30 p.m., no performance July 24, 15 N. 100 East, Provo, $12 general ($3 higher when purchased on day of performance), $12 senior/students, www.theechotheatre.com.

SUNDANCE SUMMER THEATRE, Fiddler on the Roof, book by Joseph Stein, lyrics by Sheldon Harnick, music by Jerry Bock, in partnership with Utah Valley University, set in Czarist Russia in 1905 the story centers on Tevye, the father of five daughters and his attempts to maintain his family and religious traditions while outside influences encroach upon their lives, July 24-August 16, 8 p.m. (doors open at 7 p.m.), $21 lawn, $26 bench, $30 prime bench, optional pre-show barbecue, 6:30 p.m., $16, performances Monday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights, Eccles Outdoor Stage, Sundance Resort, 8841 N. Alpine Loop Road, 866-734-4428, www.sundanceresort.com.

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PERFORMANCES-MUSIC-JULY 2014

UTAH CLASSICAL GUITAR SOCIETY, CUAC Concert Series, Austin Weyland, July 2, 7 p.m., CUAC Art Center, 175 E. 200 South, SLC, $10 suggested donation, 385-215-6768, to reserve a seat you must RSVP to art@cuaccenter.org.

THANKSGIVING POINT, Utah Symphony, Patriotic Concert Series, Vladimir Kulenovic, conductor, Mary Anne Huntsman, piano, Celena Shafer, soprano, a family-friendly concert featuring a variety of patriotic works, and Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture, Gershwin’s Piano Concerto in F, and “Summertime” from Porgy and Bess, July 2, 8 p.m., Waterfall Amphitheater, Thanksgiving Point Gardens, 3900 Garden Drive, Lehi, from $25 reserved seating, $18 general seating, Thanksgiving Point members receive a 10 percent discount, doors open at 5 p.m., 801-768-4900, www.thanksgivingpoint.org.

DEER VALLEY MUSIC FESTIVAL, The Texas Tenors, “Let Freedom Sing!,” Utah Symphony, Jerry Steichen, conductor, July 4, 7:30 p.m., Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheatre, Deer Valley Resort, $60-$85 reserved seating, $32 general admission lawn seating, tickets are $5 higher when purchased on day of performance, 801-533-6683, www.usuo.org.

THE NEW AMERICAN PHILHARMONIC, “Fireworks Concert,” David Van Alstyne, conductor, July 4, 8:30 p.m., Layton Park Amphitheater, free.

MURRAY CONCERT BAND, Sunrise Service, Dr. Craig Ferrin, principal conductor, July 4, 7 a.m., Murray Park Amphitheater, 520 E. Vine Street, free.

TEMPLE SQUARE EVENTS, 23rd Army Band, July 5, 7:30 p.m., Salt Lake Tabernacle, tickets are not required for this event, seating will be general admission.

DEER VALLEY MUSIC FESTIVAL, Kenny Rogers, Utah Symphony, Jerry Steichen, conductor, July 5, 7:30 p.m., Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheatre, Deer Valley Resort, reserved seating sold out, $42 general admission lawn seating, tickets are $5 higher when purchased on day of performance, 801-533-6683, www.usuo.org.

BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL PARK CITY, “Monday Chamber Music Concert in the Park,” outdoor concert, in collaboration with Mountain Town Music, program includes chamber works by your favorite composers along with surprising works you will hear for the first time, featuring festival artists John Jensen, piano, Armen Ksajikian, cello, Monte Belknap, violin, Leslie Harlow, viola, and Russell Harlow, clarinet, July 7, 6:30 p.m., City Park Bandstand, 1354 Park Ave., Park City, free, 435-649-5309, www.pcmusicfestival.com.

EXCELLENCE IN THE COMMUNITY CONCERT SERIES, “Monday in the Park,” Liberty Park, 600 E. 900 South, July 7, 7:30 p.m., free.

UTAH FESTIVAL, Vanessa, by Samuel Barber, original libretto by Gian-Carlo Menotti, Barbara Day Turner, conductor, Daniel Helfgot, director, Beverly O’Regan Thiele (Vanessa), Alice-Anne Light (Erika), Andrew Bidlack (Anatol), Amanda Tarver (The Old Baroness), July 9, 7:30 p.m., July 18, 7:30 p.m., July 24, 7:30 p.m., August 2, 1 p.m., Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, $45-$262 series (all four mainstage productions), $42-$247 opening week series (all four mainstage productions), $13-$77 single tickets, 800-262-0074, ext. 3, www.utahfestival.org.

FOULGER MUSIC FESTIVAL CONCERTO COMPETITION, Utah Symphony, Vladimir Kulenovic, conductor, the concert will feature the three prize winners from the competition, July 9, 7:30 p.m., Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts, $10-$15 general, $5 Weber State University students, OSBA season ticket holders may receive $2 off per ticket, 801-399-9214, or online at www.symphonyballet.org.

BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL PARK CITY, “Chamber Music Showcase,” program includes Handel’s Oboe Concerto, Ramiro Cortes’ Trio for Clarinet, Cello and Piano, and Brahms’ Piano Quartet in C minor, featuring festival artists Monte Belknap and Alexander Woods, violin, Russell Harlow, clarinet, Leslie Harlow, viola, Armen Ksajikian, cello, John Jensen, piano, July 10, 8 p.m., Park City Community Church, U-224 at Bear Hollow Dr., $20 general, $15 seniors 62+ and students, $150 general 10-punch card, $100 seniors and students 10-punch card, $90 general 6-punch card, $66 seniors and students 6-punch card, $66 6-punch card for Summit County residents, 435-649-5309, tickets at the door or in advance at www.pcmusicfestival.com, “BYOB” Bring Your Own Beethoven – Bring a “Beethoven” item and receive 
your concert ticket for a $5 discount off the regular ticket price.

UTAH FESTIVAL, Oklahoma!, by Rodgers and Hammerstein, Karen Keltner, conductor, Maggie L. Harrer, director, Leah Edwards (Laurey), Wes Mason (Curly), Kevin Nakatani (Jud), July 10, 7:30 p.m., July 17, 7:30 p.m., July 19, 7:30 p.m., July 24, 1 p.m., July 26, 1 p.m., August 1, 1 p.m., August 7-8, 7:30 p.m., Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, $45-$262 series (all four mainstage productions), $42-$247 opening week series (all four mainstage productions), $13-$77 single tickets, 800-262-0074, ext. 3, www.utahfestival.org.

EXCELLENCE IN THE COMMUNITY CONCERT SERIES, Harry Lee & the Back Alley Blues Band, July 10, 7:30 p.m., Gallivan Center, free.

DEER VALLEY MUSIC FESTIVAL, The Music of John Williams, Utah Symphony, Jeff Tyzik, conductor, July 11, 7:30 p.m., Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheatre, Deer Valley Resort, $60-$85 reserved seating, $32 general admission lawn seating, tickets are $5 higher when purchased on day of performance, 801-533-6683, www.usuo.org.

BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL PARK CITY, “Salon Concert,” a festival favorite, concertgoers dine and relax while enjoying virtuoso performances featuring festival artists, July 11, 6:30 p.m., private residence, $45 minimum donation per person, space is limited, please make your reservation as soon as possible, email chmusic@pcmusicfestival.com with your reservation, please include date(s)
of the Salon concert you would like to attend, 
your name, the number of guests in your party,
your email address and phone number, or call 435-649-5309, www.pcmusicfestival.com.

UTAH FESTIVAL, The Student Prince, by Sigmund Romberg, Barbara Day Turner, conductor, Jack Shouse, director, Andrew Bidlack (Prince Karl Franz), Richard Zuch (Doctor Engel), Emma-Grace Dunbar (Kathie), Vanessa Ballam (Princess Margaret), July 11, 7:30 p.m., July 17, 1 p.m., July 25, 1 p.m., August 1, 7:30 p.m., August 9, 1 p.m., Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, $45-$262 series (all four mainstage productions), $42-$247 opening week series (all four mainstage productions), $13-$77 single tickets, 800-262-0074, ext. 3, www.utahfestival.org.

KUTV DAYS OF ’47 POPS CONCERT, Choral Arts Society of Utah, Sterling S. Poulson, conductor, Utah National Guard 23rd Army Band, CW2 Denny Saunders, conducting, David Osmond, Clive Romney and Willingly, and Highland Drive, July 11-12, 7:30 p.m., Abravanel Hall, free, however tickets are required, available at Daynes Music, 6395 S. State, Midvale, or mail a SASE envelope and request to:  Pops Tickets, P. O. Box 2623, Salt Lake City, UT 84110, please specify the number of tickets and which night you plan to attend. Those without tickets will be seated on a first come, first served basis after 7:15 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m., for more information call 801-390-7967.

DEER VALLEY MUSIC FESTIVAL, The Music of U2, Utah Symphony, Brent Havens, conductor, Brody Dolyniuk, vocalist, July 12, 7:30 p.m., Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheatre, Deer Valley Resort, $60-$85 reserved seating, $32 general admission lawn seating, tickets are $5 higher when purchased on day of performance, 801-533-6683, www.usuo.org.

UTAH FESTIVAL, “8 Hands 2 Pianos,” Utah Festival pianists will present an unpredictable concert of classical hits where they’ll be dressing up, playing jokes on each other – and who knows what other mayhem will ensue, July 12, 1 p.m., Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, $11-$41, $10-$35 with opera series purchase, 800-262-0074, ext. 3, www.utahfestival.org.

UTAH FESTIVAL, Les Misérables, lyrics by Alain Boublil and Jean-Marc Natel, music by Claude-Michel Schönberg, Karen Keltner, conductor, Valerie Rachelle, director, Patrick Miller (Jean Valjean), Vanessa Ballam (Fantine), Daniel Cilli (Inspector Javert) Leah Edwards (Cosette), July 12, 7:30 p.m., July 16, 7:30 p.m., July 18-19, 1 p.m., July 23, 7:30 p.m., July 25-26, 7:30 p.m., July 30, 7:30 p.m., July 31, 1 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., August 2, 7:30 p.m., August 7-8, 1 p.m., Aug. 9, 7:30 p.m., Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, $45-$262 series (all four mainstage productions), $42-$247 opening week series (all four mainstage productions), $13-$77 single tickets, 800-262-0074, ext. 3, www.utahfestival.org.

BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL PARK CITY, “Sunday Afternoon Chamber Music,” music includes, Beethoven’s Piano and Violin Sonata, op. 96, Borodin’s Cello and Piano Sonata, and David Carlson’s Quantum Quartet for Clarinet, Viola, Cello and Piano, featuring festival artists Monte Belknap, violin, Russell Harlow, clarinet, Leslie Harlow, viola, Armen Ksajikian, cello, and John Jensen, piano, July 13, 3 p.m., Temple Har Shalom, U-224 at Brookside Ct., $20 general, $15 seniors and students, $150 general 10-punch card, $100 seniors and students 10-punch card, $90 general 6-punch card, $66 seniors and students 6-punch card, $66 6-punch card for Summit County residents, at the door or in advance at www.pcmusicfestival.com, “BYOB” Bring Your Own Beethoven – Bring a “Beethoven” item and receive 
your concert ticket for a $5 discount off the regular ticket price.

THE NEW AMERICAN PHILHARMONIC, “Fireworks Concert,” David Van Alstyne, conductor, July 13, 9 p.m., Lindquist Plaza, Weber State University, free.

BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL PARK CITY, “Monday Chamber Music Concert in the Park,” outdoor concert, in collaboration with Mountain Town Music, program includes chamber works by your favorite composers along with surprising works you will hear for the first time, featuring festival artists John Jensen, piano, Armen Ksajikian, cello, Monte Belknap, violin, Leslie Harlow, viola, and Russell Harlow, clarinet, July 14, 6:30 p.m., City Park Bandstand, 1354 Park Ave., Park City, free, 435-649-5309, www.pcmusicfestival.com.

INTERMEZZO CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES, Concert II, music includes Rossini’s Sonata in C major, Prokofiev’s Quintet in G minor, op. 39, Brahms’ Clarinet Quintet in B minor, David Porter and Elina Lev, violin, Roberta Zalkind, viola, Pegsoon Whang, cello, Tedd Merrit, bass, James Hall, oboe and Erin Svoboda, clarinet, July 14, 7:30 p.m., Vieve Gore Concert Hall, Westminster College, $18 general, $15 seniors, free for students, season ticket $80 general, $65 seniors, at the door or in advance online at www.intermezzoconcerts.org, 801-200-3388.

EXCELLENCE IN THE COMMUNITY CONCERT SERIES, “Monday in the Park,” Liberty Park, 600 E. 900 South, July 14, 7:30 p.m., free.

AMERICAN FORK SYMPHONY, “Salute to America.” Shauna Smith, conductor, July 14, 7 p.m., American Fork Amphitheater at Quail Court, 851 E. 700 North, free.  

WINDSTORM THEATER, “Pirates of Penzance,” by Gilbert and Sullivan, July 14-26, 7:30 p.m., also 1:30 p.m. matinees on Saturdays, no performance on July 24, Murray High School Theater, 5440 S. State, $7.99-$9.99, 801-770-4242, www.windstormtheater.com.

UTAH FESTIVAL, International Opera Competition Semifinals, Utah Festival hosts more than 20 talented artists, audience helps select winner who then heads to Italy to compete, July 15, 1 p.m., Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, $10, 800-262-0074, ext. 3, www.utahfestival.org.

DEER VALLEY MUSIC FESTIVAL, Utah Symphony, Beethoven’s “Egmont Overture,” Vladimir Kulenovic, conductor, Emma Meinrenken, violin, program also includes Schubert’s Rondo in A for Violin and Strings, Saint-Saëns’ Havanaise, Ravel’s Pavane, and Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 4, July 16, 8 p.m., St. Mary’s Church, U-224 at White Pine Canyon Rd., $32 general, tickets are $5 higher when purchased on day of performance, 801-533-6683, www.usuo.org.

BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL PARK CITY, “Chamber Music Showcase,” program includes, Turina’s La Oración del Torero, op. 34, Beethoven’s String Quartet in G major, op. 18, no. 2, Juan Bautista Plaza’s Fuga Criolla, and Paquito D’Rivera’s Wapango, featuring the Dalí String Quartet, Simon Gollo and Carlos Rubio, violins, Adriana Linares, viola, and Jesus Morales, cello, and festival artists Russell Harlow, clarinet, and Leslie Harlow, viola, July 17, 8:00 p.m., Park City Community Church, U-224 at Bear Hollow Dr., $20 general, $15 seniors 62+ and students, $150 general 10-punch card, $100 seniors and students 10-punch card, $90 general 6-punch card, $66 seniors and students 6-punch card, $66 6-punch card for Summit County residents, 435-649-5309, tickets at the door or in advance at www.pcmusicfestival.com, “BYOB” Bring Your Own Beethoven – Bring a “Beethoven” item and receive 
your concert ticket for a $5 discount off the regular ticket price.

DEER VALLEY MUSIC FESTIVAL, “1812 Overture!,” Utah Symphony, José Feghali, piano, Vladimir Kulenovic, conductor, July 18, 7:30 p.m., Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheatre, Deer Valley Resort, $49 reserved seating, $29 general admission lawn seating, tickets are $5 higher when purchased on day of performance, 801-533-6683, www.usuo.org.

BOUNTIFUL CONCERT IN THE PARK SERIES, “Faith of our Fathers,” Utah Voices and the 23rd Army Band, July 18, 7 p.m., Bountiful Park, 400 N. 200 West, free.

DEER VALLEY MUSIC FESTIVAL, Mary Chapen Carpenter, Utah Symphony, Vince Mendoza, conductor, July 19, 7:30 p.m., Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheatre, Deer Valley Resort, reserved seating sold out, $42 general admission lawn seating, tickets are $5 higher when purchased on day of performance, 801-533-6683, www.usuo.org.

BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL PARK CITY, “Salon Concert,” a festival favorite, concertgoers dine and relax while enjoying virtuoso performances featuring the Dalí Quartet, Simon Gollo and Carlos Rubio, violin, Adriana Linares, viola, and Jesus Morales, cello, July 19, 6:30 p.m., “Jane’s Home” mansion, $50 minimum donation per person, space is limited to 24 guests, please make your reservation as soon as possible, email chmusic@pcmusicfestival.com with your reservation, please include date(s)
of the Salon concerts you would like to attend, 
your name, the number of guests in your party,
your email address and phone number, or call 435-649-5309, www.pcmusicfestival.com.

MURRAY CONCERT BAND, Summer Concert, Dr. Craig Ferrin, principal conductor, July 19, 8 p.m., Murray Park Amphitheater, 520 E. Vine Street, free.

BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL PARK CITY, “30th Season Celebration,” Gala Concert and Buffet, featuring the Dalí Quartet, Simon Gollo and Carlos Rubio, violin, Adriana Linares, viola, and Jesus Morales, cello, also featuring festival artists, Russell Harlow, clarinet, and Leslie Harlow, viola, music includes Mozart’s String Quintet in G minor, K. 516, Efrain Amaya’s Angelica, Abelardito Valdez’s Danzón Almendra, Juan Bautista Plaza’s Fuga Criolla, Carlos Gardel’s El dia que me quleras, and Rafael Hernández’s El Cumbanchero, July 20, 5 p.m., Temple Har Shalom, U-224 at Brookside Ct., $75 minimum donation per person, email  chmusic@pcmusicfestival.com with your reservation, please include date(s)
of the Salon concerts you would like to attend, 
your name, the number of guests in your party,
your email address and phone number, or purchase online in advance at www.pcmusicfestival.com.

BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL PARK CITY, “Monday Chamber Music Concert in the Park,” outdoor concert, in collaboration with Mountain Town Music, featuring the Dalí Quartet, Simon Gollo and Carlos Rubio, violin, Adriana Linares, viola, and Jesus Morales, cello, July 21, 6:30 p.m., City Park Bandstand, 1354 Park Ave., Park City, free, 435-649-5309, www.pcmusicfestival.com.

EXCELLENCE IN THE COMMUNITY CONCERT SERIES, “Monday in the Park,” Liberty Park, 600 E. 900 South, July 21, 7:30 p.m., free.

UTAH FESTIVAL, “Pioneers and Patriots, A Tribute to John Philip Sousa,” presented in collaboration with the Utah State University Music Department, James Michael Bankhead, conductor, thrill to the sound of a 42-piece band with choir, soloists and surprises, in a program drawn largely from the concert Sousa himself led in Logan in 1927, July 22, 7:30 p.m., Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, $11-$41, $10-$35 with opera series purchase, 800-262-0074, ext. 3, www.utahfestival.org.

DEER VALLEY MUSIC FESTIVAL, The Muir Quartet, Peter Zazofsky, violin, Lucia Lin, violin, Steven Ansell, viola, Michael Reynolds, cello, program includes Debussy’s String Quartet, Joan Tower’s String Quartet No. 5, and Dvorák’s String Quartet No. 11, July 23, 8 p.m., St. Mary’s Church, U-224 at White Pine Canyon Rd., $32 general, tickets are $5 higher when purchased on day of performance, 801-533-6683, www.usuo.org.

BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL PARK CITY, “Chamber Music Showcase,” program includes virtuoso violin and piano works, a Beethoven string quartet, and Latin works for clarinet, violin and piano, featuring festival artists Manuel Ramos and Monte Belknap, violin, Russell Harlow, clarinet, and Leslie Harlow, viola, July 24, 7:30 p.m., Park City Community Church, U-224 at Bear Hollow Dr., $20 general, $15 seniors 62+ and students, $150 general 10-punch card, $100 seniors and students 10-punch card, $90 general 6-punch card, $66 seniors and students 6-punch card, $66 6-punch card for Summit County residents, 435-649-5309, tickets at the door or in advance at www.pcmusicfestival.com, “BYOB” Bring Your Own Beethoven – Bring a “Beethoven” item and receive 
your concert ticket for a $5 discount off the regular ticket price.

DEER VALLEY MUSIC FESTIVAL, Electric Light Orchestra, the ‘70s hybrid rock and orchestral group the Electric Light Orchestra will be performing their hits, starring former ELO members, July 25, 7:30 p.m., Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheatre, Deer Valley Resort, $60-$85 reserved seating, $32 general admission lawn seating, tickets are $5 higher when purchased on day of performance, 801-533-6683, www.usuo.org.

UTAH LYRIC OPERA, Summer Opera Workshop 2014, Pirates of Pinafore, directed by Anthony Buck, featuring the ULO’s Studio Artist Program, and Carmen, directed by Marc Reynolds, featuring ULO’s Principal Artist Program and the ULO Orchestra, Nicholas Giusti, conductor, July 25, 6 p.m. and July 26, 2 p.m. (Pirates of Pinafore), July 25, 8 p.m. and July 26, 7 p.m. (Carmen), Provo High School Auditorium, 1125 N. University Ave., $10 general, $8 seniors/students (single bill), $20 general, $15 seniors/students (double bill), www.utahlyric.org.

DEER VALLEY MUSIC FESTIVAL, “Just Imagine: The John Lennon Experience,” starring look-and-sing-alike artist Tim Piper, and rock band Working Class Hero, Greg Piper, Don Butler, Morley Bartnof and Don Poncher, the program intertwines John Lennon’s songs with the stories behind them to create a unique and electrifying multimedia concert, July 26, 7:30 p.m., Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheatre, Deer Valley Resort, $49-$69 reserved seating, $29 general admission lawn seating, tickets are $5 higher when purchased on day of performance, 801-533-6683, www.usuo.org.

BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL PARK CITY, “Salon Concert,” a festival favorite, concertgoers dine and relax while enjoying virtuoso performances featuring Festival Artists, July 26, time and location TBA, $45 minimum donation per person, space is limited please make your reservations as soon as possible, email chmusic@pcmusicfestival.com with your reservation, please include date(s)
of the Salon concerts you would like to attend, 
include your name, the number of guests in your party,
your email address and phone number, or call 435-649-5309, www.pcmusicfestival.com.

BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL PARK CITY, “Sunday Afternoon Chamber Music,” music includes Manuel de Falla’s Harpsichord Concerto, Stravinsky’s Concertino, Debussy’s String Quartet, featuring festival artists Manuel Ramos and Monte Belknap, violin, Pamela Jones, harpsichord, Robert Stephenson, oboe, Lisa Byrnes, flute, Russell Harlow, clarinet, and Leslie Harlow, viola, July 27, 3 p.m., Temple Har Shalom, U-224 at Brookside Ct., $20 general, $15 seniors and students, $150 general 10-punch card, $100 seniors and students 10-punch card, $90 general 6-punch card, $66 seniors and students 6-punch card, $66 6-punch card for Summit County residents, at the door or in advance at www.pcmusicfestival.com, “BYOB” Bring Your Own Beethoven – Bring a “Beethoven” item and receive 
your concert ticket for a $5 discount off the regular ticket price.

BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL PARK CITY, “Monday Chamber Music Concert in the Park,” outdoor concert, in collaboration with Mountain Town Music, program includes chamber works by your favorite composers along with surprising works you will hear for the first time, July 28, 6:30 p.m., City Park Bandstand, 1354 Park Ave., Park City, free, 435-649-5309, www.pcmusicfestival.com.

INTERMEZZO CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES, Concert III, music includes Kapustin’s Concerto for Two Pianos and Percussion, Xenakis’ Kassandra, Bartók’s Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion, Vedrana Subotic, Karlyn Bond and Kimi Kawashima, piano, Keith Carrick and Eric Hopkins, percussion, Michael Chipman, baritone, July 28, 7:30 p.m., Vieve Gore Concert Hall, Westminster College, $18 general, $15 seniors, free for students, season ticket $80 general, $65 seniors, at the door or in advance online at www.intermezzoconcerts.org, 801-200-3388.

EXCELLENCE IN THE COMMUNITY CONCERT SERIES, “Monday in the Park,” Liberty Park, 600 E. 900 South, July 28, 7:30 p.m., free.

UTAH FESTIVAL, Operafest/International Opera Competition Finals, Karen Keltner and Barbara Day Turner, conductors, after the competition finalists perform with orchestra and while the judges confer and the audience vote is tallied you will be entertained by Utah Festival stars, July 29, 7:30 p.m., Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, $11-$41, $10-$35 with opera series purchase, 800-262-0074, ext. 3, www.utahfestival.org.

DEER VALLEY MUSIC FESTIVAL, “Tchaikovsky’s Serenade for Strings,” Utah Symphony, Matthew Halls, guest conductor, program includes Haydn’s Symphony No. 96 Miracle, and Schubert’s Symphony No. 3, July 30, 8 p.m., St. Mary’s Church, U-224 at White Pine Canyon Rd., $32 general, tickets are $5 higher when purchased on day of performance, 801-533-6683, www.usuo.org.

DEER VALLEY MUSIC FESTIVAL, Rosco and Friction Quartets, Rosco Quartet, Jakob Hofer, Rebekah Blackner, Sunny Johnson, and Lauren Posey, Friction Quartet, Kevin Rogers, Otis Harriel, Taija Warbelow, and Doug Machiz, music features the world premieres of strings quartets by Anthony Suter and Nicolas Chuaqui, July 31, 8 p.m., St. Mary’s Church, U-224 at White Pine Canyon Rd., $25 general, tickets are $5 higher when purchased on day of performance, 801-533-6683, www.usuo.org.

BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL PARK CITY, “Chamber Music Showcase,” program includes virtuoso violin and piano works, Schubert’s Piano Trio in E flat, Copland’s Sonata for Clarinet and Piano, featuring festival artists Paul Rosenthal, violin, Russell Harlow, clarinet, Leslie Harlow, viola, Jeffrey Solow, cello, and Doris Stevenson, piano, July 31, 8 p.m., Park City Community Church, U-224 at Bear Hollow Dr., $20 general, $15 seniors 62+ and students, $150 general 10-punch card, $100 seniors and students 10-punch card, $90 general 6-punch card, $66 seniors and students 6-punch card, $66 6-punch card for Summit County residents, 435-649-5309, tickets at the door or in advance at www.pcmusicfestival.com, “BYOB” Bring Your Own Beethoven – Bring a “Beethoven” item and receive 
your concert ticket for a $5 discount off the regular ticket price.

EXCELLENCE IN THE COMMUNITY CONCERT SERIES, Josh Wright, Lindsey Wright and Mary Anne Huntsman, piano, July 31, 7:30 p.m., Gallivan Center, free.

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INTERMEZZO BEGINS 13TH SEASON MONDAY

When Vedrana Subotic and David Porter started the Intermezzo Chamber Music Series, one of their goals was to present programs offering audiences their favorites while exposing them to newer and, occasionally, neglected works.

Vedrana Subotic and David Porter

And that formula has worked quite well. Thirteen years later Intermezzo is a viable and vibrant part of the Salt Lake music scene with a loyal following.

“We’ve always tried to strike a balance between a lot of favorites that everyone wants to hear and new works. And we’ve stayed true to our intent over the years,” said Subotic, a pianist and the series music director.

And she promised that this summer’s edition of the popular series will be no different.

Intermezzo opens its five-concert series on June 30 with a more traditional program, although it does contain a work by a composer who doesn’t receive the due he deserves: Josef Suk’s Piano Trio in C minor. Suk, Antonin Dvorák’s son-in-law, wrote in a wonderfully romantic, although more Germanic, style than did Dvorák. And the piece blends in well with the remaining program, which includes Robert Schumann’s Violin Sonata in A minor, op. 105, a late work, and Dvorák’s Piano Quartet No. 2 in E flat major.

The Schumann is actually a late replacement. Originally, Krysztof Penderecki’s Violin Sonata No. 2 was on the program. However, a pregnant Heather Conner, who was going to be the evening’s pianist, surprised everyone by having her baby early. “She wasn’t due for another five weeks,” Subotic said. Replacing her will be Hyunsoon Whang, sister of Utah Symphony cellist Pegsoon Whang, who will also play at the concert.

Two composers whose names aren’t associated with chamber music will be represented this summer. Gioachino Rossini’s Sonata in C major for four strings will be played on the July 14 concert, while Richard Strauss’ early and quite demanding Violin Sonata in E flat major will be on the last concert, on Aug. 11.

Also on the July 14 program will be Sergei Prokofiev’s seldom played Quintet in G minor, op. 39, and Johannes Brahms’ Clarinet Quintet in B minor. “The Brahms is everyone’s favorite,” Subotic said. Playing it will be the Utah Symphony’s new associate principal clarinet Erin Svoboda, who will also be featured prominently in the Prokofiev quintet.

Paired with the Strauss sonata on Aug. 11 is Tchaikovsky’s Piano Trio in A minor. The Strauss isn’t performed very often, unlike the Tchaikovsky, which is a standard in the piano trio repertoire. “The Tchaikovsky is a well known and well loved work,” Subotic said.

The July 28 concert will offer two Utah premieres: Nikolai Kapustin’s Concerto for Two Pianos and Percussion and Iannis Xenakis’ Kassandra.

While hardly a household name in Utah, the 76-year-old Ukrainian Kapustin catapulted to international attention in the early 1980s with his Variations for Piano, op. 41, which uses the opening bassoon solo from Igor Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring, but in a jazzed up form. “He uses some neat and interesting jazz idioms in his music,” said Subotic, who is very familiar with Kapustin’s music. She added that the Concerto is an extremely demanding piece. “It’s very virtuosic and very difficult rhythmically.”

Xenakis’ piece is scored for baritone and percussion. The text is from the Oresteia

and the singer, in this case Michael Chipman, is required to represent both Kassandra and the chorus. “He’s also required at times to play the psaltery [an ancient plucked string instrument],” Subotic said, adding that it’s a fabulously difficult work for both the singer and the percussionist. “The percussion part is incredibly exciting and dramatic. I’m really thrilled to have this piece on the program.”

Rounding out the concert is Bartók’s Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion.

Finally, the Aug. 4 concert will focus on music for woodwinds, with works by Ibert, Prokofiev, Kurtág and Mozart.

Programming concerts with such divergent repertoire can pose some challenges, but Subotic said it’s always been a collaborative effort between her and Porter, a member of the violin section of the Utah Symphony and a violist on occasion who is also the president of Intermezzo. “The origins of our repertoire programming always seem to unfold from a few ideas that are carried over from the summer before. David and I still brainstorm together and share responsibilities that fall outside of our respective ‘titles’ so nothing is exactly divided between us.” It’s an organic process, she added.

Below is the concert schedule. All concerts start at 7:30 p.m. and take place in Vieve Gore Concert Hall on the Westminster College campus. Individual tickets are $18 for general admission and $16 for seniors. Season tickets are $80 for general admission and $65 for seniors. Students are admitted free with ID. Tickets can be purchased at the door or in advance by calling 801-200-3388 or by logging on to www.intermezzoconcerts.org.

  • June 30 — Program: Suk, Piano Trio in C minor; Schumann, Violin Sonata in A minor, op. 105; Dvorák, Piano Quartet No. 2 in E flat major. Performers: Lun Jiang, violin; David Porter, violin and viola; Pegsoon Whang, cello; Hyunsoon Whang, piano.
  • July 14 — Program: Rossini, Sonata in C major; Prokofiev, Quintet in G minor, op. 39; Brahms, Clarinet Quintet in B minor. Performers: David Porter, Elina Lev, violin; Roberta Zalkind, viola; Pegsoon Whang, cello; Ted Merritt, bass; James Hall, oboe; Erin Svoboda, clarinet.
  • July 28 — Program: Kapustin, Concerto for Two Pianos and Percussion; Xanakis, Kassandra; Bartók, Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion. Musicians: Vedrana Subotic, Karlyn Bond, Kimi Kawashima, piano; Michael Chipman, baritone; Eric Hopkins, Keith Carrick, percussion.
  • Aug. 4 — Program: Ibert, Trois pièces brèves; Prokofiev, Sonata in D major for Flute and Piano; Kurtág, Bagatelles; Mozart, Woodwind Quintet in E flat major, K. 452. Performers: Mercedes Smith, flute; Lissa Stolz, oboe; Erin Svoboda, clarinet; Lori Wike, bassoon; Ron Beitel, horn; Jens TenBroek, bass; Karlyn Bond, piano.
  • Aug. 11 — Program: Strauss, Violin Sonata; Tchaikovsky, Piano Trio in A minor. Performers: Kathryn Eberle, Karen Wyatt, violin; Matthew Johnson, cello; Vedrana Subotic, piano.
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