MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL EVENT SCHEDULE

Below is a listing of all concerts and events at the Moab Music Festival, which runs Aug. 28-Sept. 8. For more information or to order tickets call the festival office at 435-259-7003 or log on to www.moabmusicfest.org.

  • Aug. 28, 12 p.m., “Grotto Concert I.” A 45 minute jet boat ride down the Colorado River that transports you to “nature’s concert hall,” a pristine, acoustically perfect wilderness grotto; not appropriate for children under 12. Music by Messiaen, Castañeda, Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. Performers: Edmar Castañeda, harp; Eric Ruske, horn; Jennifer Frautschi and Harumi Rhodes, violin; LP How and Leslie Tomkins, viola; Tanya Tomkins, cello; and Pedja Muzijevic, piano. ($325, of which $190 is tax deductible)
  • Aug. 29, 7 p.m., Star Hall (159 E. Center St.), “Festival Opening Night: Music, Marriage and Madness.” Music by Robert Schumann, Clara Schumann, and Johannes Brahms. Performers: Eric Ruske, horn; Jennifer Frautschi and Harumi Rhodes, violin; LP How and Leslie Tomkins, viola; Tanya Tomkins and Jeremy Turner, cello; and Michel Barrett, Pedja Muzijevic and Eric Zivian, piano. ($25)
  • Aug. 30, 9 a.m., “Music Hike I.” A concert for the outdoor enthusiast; you will be transported to a secret wilderness location, from there a rigorous hike leads you to a natural setting for acoustic music; the hike requires a moderate level of stamina, agility and comfort, with uneven footing, slick rock, and some exposure to sun; outdoor clothing for a desert environment is recommended, hiking or trail shoes are required; not suitable for children under 12. Performers: Eric Ruske, horn, LP How and Harumi Rhodes, violin; Leslie Tomkins, viola; and Jeremy Turner cello. ($60)
  • Aug. 30, 6 p.m., Festival Tent, Red Cliffs Lodge (Mile Post 14 on Highway 128), “Edmar Castañeda Quartet.” Edmar Castañeda, harp; Andrea Tierra, vocals; Shiomi Cohen saxophone; and Dave Silliman, percussion. ($30)
  • Aug. 31, 9 a.m., “Music Hike II.” A concert for the outdoor enthusiast; you will be transported to a secret wilderness location, from there a rigorous hike leads you to a natural setting for acoustic music; the hike requires a moderate level of stamina, agility and comfort, with uneven footing, slick rock, and some exposure to sun; outdoor clothing for a desert environment is recommended, hiking or trail shoes are required; not suitable for children under 12. Performers: LP How, Harumi Rhodes and Jennifer Frautschi, violin. ($60)
  • Aug. 31, 6 p.m., Festival Tent, Red Cliffs Lodge, “Ireland in the New World.” Music by Percy Grainger, John Scott Skinner, Natalie Haas and traditional selections from Scotland and Ireland. Performers: Christopher Layer, pipes and flutes; Maeve Gilchrist, lever harp; Paul Woodiel, fiddle; Natalie Haas, cello. ($30)
  • Sept. 1, 2 p.m., Swanny Park (400 N. 100 West), “Rocky Mountain Power Family Picnic Concert.” The festival honors the milestone of Canyonlands National Park’s 50th anniversary with a brand new work, Grandstaff, written by Utah composer Gerald Elias; the program also includes Celtic tunes and the music of harpist Edmar Castañeda and vocalist Andrea Tierra. (Free)
  • Sept. 2, 6 p.m., Ranch Benefit Concert (held at a private ranch), “El Camino: The Road to Spanish Celtica.” Performers: Christopher Layer, pipes and flutes; Maeve Gilchrist, lever harp; Paul Woodiel, fiddle; and Natalie Haas, cello. ($100)
  • Sept. 3, 5:30 p.m., House Benefit Concert (held at a private home). Music by Debussy, Mozart and Fauré. Performers: LP How and Arnaud Sussmann, violin; Max Mandel and Leslie Tomkins, viola; Tanya Tomkins and Jeremy Turner, cello; and Pedja Muzijevic and Eric Zivian, piano. ($250)
  • Sept. 4, 12 p.m., “Grotto Concert II.” A 45 minute jet boat ride down the Colorado River that transports you to “nature’s concert hall,” a pristine, acoustically perfect wilderness grotto; not appropriate for children under 12. Music by Beethoven, Boccherini and Brahms. Performers: Marc Teicholz, guitar; Ayano Ninomiya and Arnaud Sussmann, violin; Max Mandel and Leslie Tomkins, viola; Tanya Tomkins and Jeremy Turner, cello; and Pedja Muzijevic and Eric Zivian, piano. ($325, of which $190 is tax deductible)
  • Sept. 5, 6 p.m., Sorrel River Ranch (Mile Post 17 on Highway 128). “Freedom and Censorship: The Music of Russia and Poland.” Music by Shostakovich, Chopin, Weinberg, Bacevicz and Rimsky-Korsakov Performers: LP How and Arnaud Sussmann, violin; Max Mandel and Leslie Tomkins, viola; Tanya Tomkins and Jeremy Turner, cello; and Pedja Muzijevic and Eric Zivian, piano. ($30)
  • Sept. 6, 11 a.m., Star Hall, “Open Rehearsal Conversation.” Get an insider’s view of how musicians create a staged production of Gilbert and Sullivan’s Trial by Jury, in partnership with the University of Utah Opera Department; Michael Barrett, conductor, Robert Breault, tenor; LP How and Arnaud Sussmann, violin; Jeremy Turner, cello; and Eric Zivian, piano. (Free)
  • Sept. 6, 6 p.m., Sorrel River Ranch, “John Pizzarelli Quartet.” John Pizzarelli, guitar and vocals; Konrad Paszkudzki, piano; Martin Pazzarelli, bass; and Kevin Kanner, drums. ($30)
  • Sept. 7, 9 a.m., “Music Hike III.” A concert for the outdoor enthusiast; you will be transported to a secret wilderness location, from there a rigorous hike leads you to a natural setting for acoustic music; the hike requires a moderate level of stamina, agility and comfort, with uneven footing, slick rock, and some exposure to sun; outdoor clothing for a desert environment is recommended, hiking or trail shoes are required; not suitable for children under 12. Performers: LP How, Mark Teicholz, guitar; Dana Lyn, fiddle; Christopher Layer, pipes and flutes; Jeremy Turner, cello. ($60)
  • Sept. 7, 7 p.m., Star Hall, “Festival Finale: There Will Always Be an England.” Music by Benjamin Britten, Alice Verne-Bredt, Arnold Bax and Gilbert and Sullivan. Performers: Robert Breault, tenor; Marc Teicholz, guitar; Ayano Ninomiya, Arnaud Sussmann and Paul Woodiel, violin; Tanya Tomkins and Jeremy Turner, cello; Jeffrey Price and Eric Zivian, piano; Michael Barrett, conductor; and Julie Wright-Costa, stage director. ($30)
  • Sept. 8, 12 p.m., “Grotto Concert III.” A 45 minute jet boat ride down the Colorado River that transports you to “nature’s concert hall,” a pristine, acoustically perfect wilderness grotto not appropriate for children under 12. Music by J.S. Bach. Performers: Marc Teicholz, guitar; Ayano Ninomiya and Arnaud Sussmann, violin; LP How and Leslie Tomkins, viola; Tanya Tomkins ad Jeremy Tucker, cello; and Michael Barrett and Eric Zivian, piano. ($325, of which $190 is tax deductible)
  • Sept. 8, 12 p.m., “Musical River Raft Trip.” A 4-day, 3-night custom raft trip that begins with a grotto concert; there will be daily concerts and rafting on the Colorado River with an exhilarating run of the Class III and IV rapids of world-famous Cataract Canyon; then take a jet boat for the final leg of the trip to Hite Marina at Lake Powell to catch a scenic flight over Canyonlands National Park and the Colorado River. ($2,100)
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PARK CITY FILM MUSIC FESTIVAL Film Scoring Seminar and “ALIVE INSIDE” Documentary Screening

WED AUG 27
PCFMF FILM SCORING SEMINAR:
By popular demand we have added one more film scoring seminar with composer Hummie Mann: Wednesday, Aug. 27, 7:00-8:30PM
The seminar is designed as an introduction to the process of scoring music for film, and serves as an excellent guide for filmmakers planning to work with composers and musicians, as well as for musicians and composers who want to learn more about creating film scores and working with filmmakers.

Park City Film Music Festival at the Prospector Lodge and Conference Center in Park City:
2175 Sidewinder Dr. , PC, UT 84060.
Admission is $20 per person and
is payable online
or at the door prior to
the seminar.
___________________________________________

SAT AUG 30
“ALIVE INSIDE” Documentary Film Showcase Screening
Don’t miss the SHOWCASE SCREENING this weekend of the documentary film “ALIVE INSIDE”.
The screening will be at 3PM, Saturday, August 30, at the Prospector Theater, 2175 Sidewinder Dr. in Park City.
Tickets are $5 at the door or online in advance at this link:

ALIVE INSIDE is a joyous cinematic exploration of music’s capacity to reawaken our souls and uncover the deepest parts of our humanity. Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett chronicles the astonishing experiences of individuals around the country who have been revitalized through the simple experience of listening to music. His camera reveals the uniquely human connection we find in music and how its healing power can triumph where prescription medication falls short.

This stirring documentary follows social worker Dan Cohen, founder of the nonprofit organization Music & Memory, as he fights against a broken healthcare system to demonstrate music’s ability to combat memory loss and restore a deep sense of self to those suffering from it. Rossato-Bennett visits family members who have witnessed the miraculous effects of personalized music on their loved ones, and offers illuminating interviews with experts including renowned neurologist and best-selling author Oliver Sacks (Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain) and musician Bobby McFerrin (“Don’t Worry, Be Happy”).

An uplifting cinematic exploration of music and the mind, ALIVE INSIDE’s inspirational and emotional story left audiences humming, clapping and cheering at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival, where it won the Audience Award.

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AUDITIONS ANNOUNCED FOR AMERICAN WEST CHORUS AND CHAMBER SINGERS

The American West Chorus and Chamber Singers are holding auditions for the 2014-15 season. We perform a variety of choral repertoire, either independently or with the American West Symphony. Rehearsals are held on Monday evenings in Sandy beginning Sept. 8. Our first concert of the season will feature favorites from Broadway musicals.

To schedule an audition or for more information, please contact Carolyn at 801-733-4220.

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MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL TO PREMIERE WORK BY GERALD ELIAS

Among his many interests, Gerald Elias has also become somewhat of a chronicler of Southeast Utah history.

In 2002, the violinist, composer and author wrote Conversations with Essie,which the Moab Music Festival premiered that year and revived in 2012. The piece is based on the oral history of Essie Larsen White, who in the early 20th century lived on a ranch near Moab where Red Cliffs Lodge now sits.

Gerald Elias

“At the time I wrote Essie I was thinking of all kinds of possibilities,” Elias said in an interview with Reichel Recommends. With his fertile mind, Elias was looking into subject matter for future works rooted in Utah’s red rock country.

One person who intrigued him was William Grandstaff (also spelled Granstaff), better known today as the namesake of Negro Bill Canyon. “William came to Moab and set up house in the fort that the Mormon settlers built and which they abandoned in the 1860s because of conflicts with the Indians,” Elias said. Grandstaff got along with the Indians and traded with them.

In the 1870s the settlers came back and were soon in conflict once again with the native population. But instead of acknowledging that the problems lay with them, the settlers blamed Grandstaff for getting the Indians riled up. “William feared for his life and left,” Elias said. “He went to what became known as Negro Bill Canyon, where he ranched.” It was the only spot in the area that had a permanently flowing stream. And it wasn’t too many years after Grandstaff had settled there that other settlers wanted that land. “He moved to Colorado where he became a saloon owner and was well respected in the community,” Elias said.

Elias’ Grandstaff, which the Moab Music Festival will premiere at its Sept. 1 concert commemorating Canyonlands National Park’s 50th anniversary, focuses on the moment where Grandstaff decides whether to stay and fight the settlers or leave. “Lurking behind the story is an element of racism,” Elias said. “But I didn’t make it contentious. I wanted to give people food for thought.”

In addition to writing the music, Elias also wrote the text. “I made it all up, except for one quote which I’m confident William said: ‘I have the feeling I am the Indian they are after.’”

Michael Barrett, co-director of the festival, suggested that the piece be scored for one voice and a few instruments. But Elias, who has a keen eye for the dramatic, decided to add two other characters beside Grandstaff. In addition to the title role, Elias also included a character named Frenchie, a scoundrel who lived in the area and knew Grandstaff, and Rebecca, the woman Grandstaff married after he moved to Colorado. “I decided to take some liberties and place her in Moab,” Elias said.

The 10-minute work is scored for flute, violin and piano and invokes the mood and spirit of the location and time. “I wanted the instruments to give a sense of place,” Elias said. “I wrote the flute part in Native American style rather than concert style, and there is a lot of fiddling for the violin. And the piano is a good instrument to help fill out textures and harmonies.”

The music for Grandstaff is very accessible, Elias explained. “It’s a tonal piece, generally. It has a somewhat contemporary sound but with a lot of folk elements.” As an example, Elias pointed to Frenchie’s music. Since he was a French-Canadian trapper Elias gave his music a Cajun lilt.

Singing the roles are baritone Jared Lesa (Grandstaff); tenor Lucas Goodrich (Frenchie); and soprano Jennifer Erickson (Rebecca). The ensemble consists of Christopher Layer, flute; Paul Woodiel, violin; and Mary Anne Hunstman, piano. Barrett will conduct.

“William led an interesting life,” Elias said. “It makes a compelling story. There is a lot of humor in it and it’s a great theater piece that anyone can enjoy.”

  • CONCERT DETAILS
  • What: Moab Music Festival
  • Venue: Swanny City Park, 400 N. 100 West, Moab
  • Time and Date: 2 p.m. Sept. 1
  • Tickets: Free
  • Phone: 435-259-7003
  • Web:www.moabmusicfest.org

(For a schedule of festival events please click here.) 

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PIANIST KARÉN HAKOBYAN IN RECITAL WEDNESDAY

Karén Hakobyan (Photo Credit: Brittany Gray Photography)

Karén Hakobyan, a University of Utah alumnus who now makes his home in New York City, will return to Salt Lake City Wednesday to give a recital. Part of the U.’s Piano Centennial Celebration Series, the program will include music by Beethoven, Ravel, Gershwin, Rachmaninoff, Horowitz, Scriabin and Armenian composer Arno Babadjanian. Hakobyan will also play some of his own works.

The recital takes place in Libby Gardner Concert Hall on the U. campus. Tickets are $10 for general admission and $6 for students and are available at the door. There will be free admission for those with a University of Utah ID.

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EARLY MUSIC SERIES heART MUSIC DEBUTS SUNDAY

Summer classical music offerings have been steadily increasing in and around Salt Lake City giving audiences a wide variety of choices. Now there is a new series set to make its debut this Sunday.

heArt Music cofounders Lisa Chaufty and Haruhito Miyagi (Photo: Reichel Recommends)

heArt Music, the brainchild of Haruhito Miyagi and Lisa Chaufty, is an early music series that will explore a broad range of repertoire, from Gregorian Chant to the late baroque. “We’re trying to expose people to this music,” Miyagi said.

Although early music has had a presence in the Salt Lake Valley since the 1980s, there haven’t been many ensembles devoted to playing music written within the timeframe represented by the term “early music.” There are a couple of notable ones, though. The University of Utah has had an early music group for several years, and Utopia Early Music has established itself firmly in the local classical music scene. “Utopia has done a great job bringing people in to their concerts,” said Chaufty, who will assume directorship of the U.’s early music ensemble this fall. And because of Utopia’s presence, Chaufty and Miyagi decided to present their series during the summer so as not to conflict with Utopia’s concert schedule, which runs from October to May.

Chaufty admitted that the Salt Lake City area has a lot of music events, but she insisted there is always room for more, especially for young performers and early music. “There are not enough performing opportunities for students, especially for this music,” Chaufty said, adding that she and Miyagi envision heArt Music as a venue for a rotating group of players. Chaufty, who plays recorder and baroque flute, and Miyagi, whose instruments are the organ and harpsichord, will make up the core of the group. And for each concert, they will invite other musicians to join them.

For their first concert on Sunday, they’ve invited Nicolas Chuaqui, tenor, and Cheryl Hart, soprano; David Fox, organ; Eleanor Christman Cox, baroque cello; and Leslie J. Richards, viola da gamba. Chuaqui is Chaufty’s son; he is also a member of the Cathedral of the Madeleine choir. Richards is a member of the Utah Symphony’s viola section. “She is a wonderful player on the viola da gamba,” Chaufty said.

The program, titled Flores del Verano: Concierto de Música Antigua (Flowers of Summer: A Concert of Early Music), will include music by Ockeghem, Telemann, Handel and Rameau, as well as Gregorian Chant.

The concert will take place in Sacred Heart Catholic Church in downtown Salt Lake City, where Miyagi is the music director. The name of the church is also the reason why the series is called heArt Music. “The church has lots of hearts, of course,” Miyagi said, “everywhere from the door to the stained glass windows.” Chaufty said she likes hearts. “And music has to come from the heart,” she added.

Since the church’s congregation is mostly Hispanic, the concerts will have a bilingual approach. “Our program notes will be in both Spanish and English,” Chaufty said, adding that the series will address itself in part to a segment of the community that has been underserved in the classical music scene here. “There is a need for music in the Latino community,” Miyagi said. “We want to have audiences made up of diverse backgrounds.”

There will only be one concert this season, but both Miyagi and Chaufty said their goal is to have a multi-concert season. “We’re planning on having four to five concerts per season, starting next summer,” Chaufty said. All concerts will be free of charge.

  • CONCERT DETAILS
  • What: heArt Music
  • Venue: Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 946 S. 200 East
  • Time and Date: 3 p.m. Aug. 17
  • Tickets: Free
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FROM PONCHIELLI TO SHOSTAKOVICH, SUNDAY’S BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL CONCERT RUNS GAMUT OF EMOTIONS

BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL PARK CITY, Temple Har Shalom, Aug. 10

Louis Spohr is an under appreciated composer today. A younger contemporary of Beethoven who outlived the older composer by some 30 years, Spohr contributed significantly to the development of German romanticism. Among his many works is a considerable body of art songs that are worthy to be placed among the contributions to the form by Schubert and Schumann.

Kirsten Gunlogson

Sunday’s Beethoven Festival Park City concert included Spohr’s Sechs deutsche Lieder, op. 103, for mezzo-soprano, clarinet and piano, performed by mezzo Kirsten Gunlogson, clarinetist Lee Livengood and pianist Melissa Livengood.

This set of six art songs is wonderfully expressive and idiomatically romantic. Gunlogson’s rich and vibrant voice is perfectly suited for this music. She captured the mood and character of each with her lyrically infused and lushly expressive singing that brought depth and dimension to the poetry.

This effusive interpretation was underscored by Lee Livengood’s seamlessly crafted and lyrical playing and Melissa Livengood’s sensitive piano playing.

Gunlogson also sang Ernest Chausson’s dark Chanson perpétuelle, op. 37. She crafted an evocative, expressive interpretation that brought out the emotional power of the poem. The eloquence Gunlogson brought to the work was complemented by the sensitive playing of Melissa Livengood and the string quartet consisting of violinists Blanka Bednarz, violist Leslie Harlow and cellist Cheung Chau.

After intermission, Bednarz, Chau and Melissa Livengood gave a powerful reading of Dmitri Shostakovich’s Piano Trio No. 2 in E minor.

Like so much of his music, the E minor Trio is angst ridden. Written towards the end of World War II, it’s overwhelmingly dark; there is also a pervading sense of imminent doom. The three musicians captured this emotional heaviness brilliantly with their acutely sensitive and nuanced playing. Their account was compelling and moving, thanks to their wonderfully articulated and executed interpretation.

The concert opened on the other end of the emotional spectrum with Amilcare Ponchielli’s operatic Il Convegno, a captivating divertimento for two clarinets played with exuberance by Russell Harlow and Lee Livengood. They captured the melodicism of the piece with their lighthearted and amiable reading.

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THIERRY FISCHER IN DEER VALLEY DEBUT

DEER VALLEY MUSIC FESTIVAL, Utah Symphony Chamber Orchestra, St. Mary’s Church, Aug. 6; festival runs through Aug. 9, tickets at 801-533-6683 or www.usuo.org 

Utah Symphony music director Thierry Fischer made his Deer Valley Music Festival debut Wednesday in a program of Mozart and early Beethoven, composers whose music certainly is suited to the intimate confines of St. Mary’s Church. A comparable program a week ago with guest conductor Matthew Halls worked wonderfully, and one could have expected the same result Wednesday. However, Fischer seemed to have forgotten where he was. His interpretation of the three works (Mozart’s overture to Lucio Silla and the Linz Symphony and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 2) was explosive and overstated. He went for a big sound, and he certainly got it. It would have been fine in the large and acoustically suited Abravanel Hall, but in the church’s small space it was too much.

And Fischer’s penchant for fast tempos didn’t help either. Too frequently the music came across as muddled and undefined — very uncharacteristic for Fischer, who has developed the orchestra into a commendable ensemble for 18th century music.

There were a large number of subs playing Wednesday, and they did do a credible job with the three works, although their playing lacked the orchestra’s usual finesse and clean articulation.

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INTERMEZZO CONCERT PUTS SPOTLIGHT ON UTAH SYMPHONY’S WOODWIND SECTION

INTERMEZZO CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES, Vieve Gore Concert Hall, Westminster College, Aug. 4

After last week’s piano/percussion extravaganza, Monday’s Intermezzo Chamber Music Series concert was a bit more subdued. After all, there was Mozart on the program Monday. But the three works preceding that offered some spiciness, and the end result was anything but tame.

Robert Stephenson

The concert put members of the Utah Symphony’s woodwind section in the spotlight — and principal oboe Robert Stephenson in the hot seat. He was a last minute replacement for Lissa Stolz, who had to bow out because of illness. (According to Intermezzo president David Porter, Stephenson didn’t get the call until about an hour before the start of the concert.) But one would never have guessed he wasn’t originally scheduled to play; he acquitted himself splendidly in the two works he played. The others were also fabulous, and it was a remarkable and memorable concert.

Stephenson and symphony colleagues Mercedes Smith, flute; Erin Svoboda, clarinet; Lori Wike, bassoon; and Ron Beitel, horn, got things started with a delightful account of Jacques Ibert’s bouncy 3 Pièces brèves. They captured the playfulness and lyricism of the three short movements with their well crafted and executed interpretation.

Before intermission Smith and pianist Caleb Harris gave a sizzling account of Sergei Prokofiev’s Sonata in D major for Flute and Piano. The work tests the mettle of the flutist and Smith sailed through it with flying colors. She gave a stunningly virtuosic performance that was nuanced and also underscored the lyrical content of the score. It was a superbly crafted reading that put Smith’s technical prowess and musicality on display.

The second half began with György Kurtág’s pungent Bagatelles, played by Smith, Harris and symphony bassist Jens TenBroek. The score is wonderfully vivid and, even though the six movements are extremely brief, it shows the many influences that are at work in Kurtág’s musical language.

The work as a whole is kaleidoscopic in character, paying homage to a number of composers, including J.S. Bach, and ends with a wickedly hallucinogenic reworking of Claude Debussy’s piano piece, La fille aux cheveux de lins.

The three gave an imaginative and wonderfully crafted account that had depth, and they also incorporated a broad palette of expressions into their playing.

The concert ended with Mozart’s Quintet in E flat for Piano and Winds, K. 452. The five (Stephenson, Svoboda, Wike, Beitel and Harris) displayed great ensemble play as they imbued their account with nuance and gorgeously expressed lyricism. Their playing was fluid and their interpretation was spot on. It was an exquisite performance that was well balanced and cleanly executed.

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PERFORMANCES-MUSIC-AUGUST 2014

The music calendar for August has now been posted. Click here to view it in the “Events Calendar.”

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PERFORMANCES-DANCE-AUGUST 2014

The dance calendar for August has now been posted. Click here to view it in the “Events Calendar.”

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PERFORMANCES-THEATRE-AUGUST 2014

The theatre calendar for August has now been posted. Click  here to view it in the “Events Calendar.”

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